What is a herta?

Multibomber

New member
I cant find a clear explanation anywhere. Apparently there's 3 stroke, 4 stroke, and 5 stroke hertas... who knows what I'm talking about??
 

SGarrett

New member
Take an 8th note triplet and add a sextuplet double on the first note, for a total of four notes.

R-L-R turns into RR-L-R, keeping the triplet feel.

I believe this is correct for 16th notes, but I could have the name wrong...someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

Put 32nd note doubles, or singles if you wish, on the first two notes of a group of 16th notes.

R-L-R-L turns into RR-LL-R-L.

And, of course, you can move those all around within each grouping. R-LL-R, R-LL-RR-L, etc..
 

Rob Crisp

New member
You know that kick ass fill on "No One Knows" that sounds like a cross between a triplet and semiquavers? That's a great example!

I play them hand to hand, almost like a flam at the start when played at high tempo, but rather than a ghost note it's an actual measured note, like Scott said keeping the triplet feel.

1 2 3 4
RL-R-L |RL-R-L |RL-R-L |RL-R-L |

I've also heard them referred to as the "Cobham Rudiment", after the man himself.
 

Alan_

New member
I use that rhythm fairly regularly. usually instead of phrasing as triplets I'll throw it out based on a straight 16th note pulse, which creates a nice 4-over-3 polyrhythm as related to the basic quarter note pulse.
 

SGarrett

New member
Alan Johnson's right about Olsen Johnson being right!

All the notes should sound similar where a rough is played with ghost notes.
 

SGarrett

New member
You know, I've never really gotten the whole thing about single strokes vs. double strokes, since the ultimate goal of doubles is to make them sound like singles. Either sticking works and I actually use both. :)
 

Alan_

New member
I generally stick them left lead for some reason. I do that a lot with fills on the kit, though.
 
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