Tuning heads with an electric tuner.

Piddywiffle

New member
I just wanna' know if anyone out here uses an electric drum tuner to tune their drums? I've been tempted to look into this for consistant tuning at all times. When I finally settle on a sound i'll want to be able to keep the drums in that constant state. Like say... I bust a head. Well I gotta re-tune and despite my best efforts I may not be able to mimic the orginal heads sound.

SO TO PARAPHRASE: If you or anyone you know tunes with an electric tuner, then ask them or yourself how well it works for you and feed that info on down the line to me.

Thanks
8) <-- the cool guy
 

Cheapskate

New member
Ive never used an electric tuner, but I have been using an Evans tourque wrench tuner that I got at Guitar center for 20$...though it's not perefect, it is and easy way to get your heads in the range you want quickly, then usaully a half tune by hand gets em good to go..

the draw backs are that you need to keep your luggs lubed so there's not gunk messing up the torque...this also seems to make them detune easier, and the key itself is really cheaply made, the plastic started cracking off mine in the first week, but it still works, and its is the only torque key Ive seen around latley

and I think it works better than those pressure tester thing that you set on the head itself...
 

Flatliner

New member
I haven't, but I'm pretty sure you'll have a really hard time doing this because you will get to many vibrations and overtones combating each other between your bater and resonating heads.

Its also technically impossible to tune a two headed drum to a specific note because of this. You would probably be better served just practicing tuning your heads by getting the tone you want and undoing your head and retuning it to the desired tone again. Look up tuning techniques on the web and do your tuning using small adjustments, this is something that takes time, just like learning to tune a melodic instrument by practicing it.
 

Piddywiffle

New member
Flatliner":21rbk4zq said:
I haven't, but I'm pretty sure you'll have a really hard time doing this because you will get to many vibrations and overtones combating each other between your bater and resonating heads.

Its also technically impossible to tune a two headed drum to a specific note because of this. You would probably be better served just practicing tuning your heads by getting the tone you want and undoing your head and retuning it to the desired tone again. Look up tuning techniques on the web and do your tuning using small adjustments, this is something that takes time, just like learning to tune a melodic instrument by practicing it.

Yea, this is what ive been doin anyway. Marking the screws is worthless since every head is different and will stretch different.

Okie. I was just hopen for an easy way to work new heads in. Too bad =D

This drummen thing is a full time job :roll:
 

Sway

New member
Ear tuning is the way to go. It may not be perfect for a long while but when that skill is aquired it is somthing to brag about.
 

wii2525

New member
Ear tuning will give you the sound you really want. Any other tuner is just to get you in the ballpark of where you want your sound. You have to ear tune it to the exact sound you want tho.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
I use a Korg MA-30 Metronome with built in pitch reference.

My tuning Sequence and method is as follows:

MY TOMS ARE ALL TUNED TO MUSICAL NOTES

MY 12" TOM IS TUNED TO THE KEY OF "C"

MY 13" TOM IS TUNED TO THE KEY OF "G"

MY 16" FLOOR TOM IS TUNED TO THE KEY OF "C"

MY BASS DRUM TUNED LOW JUST BEFORE IT EBGINS TO WRINKLE

MY SNARE TUNED TO HIGH "C"

ALL HEADS, BOTTOM AND TOP ARE TUNED THE SAME
 

drumur

New member
I usually just tune the drum in 1/4 by ear. 98% of the time I just hear it and tune the drums.
I have used a Korg MA-30 Metronome with built in pitch reference too. I've tuned the 10" to E, then work down in 1/4s.
 
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