Triplets

Metal Mickey

New member
First off, I'm new to drumming and new to this site; so:

a) Hello :)
b) Don't laugh when I don't understand the drummers' lingo!

I'm nearly nineteen and have been drumming for a couple of weeks now, well, since I got my kit. It's a second hand (good condition) black Pearl 5-piece, quite a decent one, at least for a beginner. I haven't been playing anywhere near long enough to say 'I play like so-and-so', infact I can't really play at all, but I think I prefer a deeper, rock-sounding style of play than fast punk (although I do love punk). I'm more into playing the toms and lots on the bass than the snare and hi-hat.

The reason I titled this thread as such is because triplets are something I've just discovered in the last few days - and I'm loving them. I don't know if I have a knack for drumming and I don't really know how long it is before people normally have them learned but I seem to have picked them up really well. I can keep a nice, steady rhythm on the toms, mixing them up a bit and intersperse it with hits on the snare like John Bonham (favourite drummer along with Keith Moon). Really pleased with myself actually because I can't have spent more than about four hours in total practising and I seem to be playing evenly and at a decent pace, although I'll probably put myself to shame as I learn what you lot can do.

I'm trying not to be too ambitious and learn how to run before I can walk, but I've probably shot myself in the foot already by learning triplets. What should I be learning first? I know how to hold the sticks, how to set up the kit and all that, but what are the things I should be trying to master before all else?

Thanks.
 

okjohne

New member
Get a copy of the 13 basic rudiments. Try google. Triplets are on there. If you can't read the music then get some one to help you. May be just a couple lessons to get started. Practice the crap out of them with a metronome. This is mostly gonna be snare work for a while.
 

keith bushey

New member
Practice good habits...sit straight, stay relaxed and focused, and practice all the material you can put your hands on! Get a metronome, even a cheap one, and always start slow.
 

eml

New member
Speaking of metronomes, how did y'all learn to play with them? I find it to be extremely hard, but I haven't yet tried enough and I barely hear the click while using them. Aiming to learn it next week when we'll try to record some stuff. Any tips? I was thinking I'd take it home and do some table drumming just to get used to playing according to it.

For the thread starter, welcome and sorry for borrowing your topic! :)
 

tero

New member
eml":1m5a0yi6 said:
Speaking of metronomes, how did y'all learn to play with them? I find it to be extremely hard, but I haven't yet tried enough and I barely hear the click while using them. Aiming to learn it next week when we'll try to record some stuff. Any tips? I was thinking I'd take it home and do some table drumming just to get used to playing according to it.

For the thread starter, welcome and sorry for borrowing your topic! :)
don't hear the click? get some headphones :)
 

eml

New member
tero":3lgava34 said:
eml":3lgava34 said:
Speaking of metronomes, how did y'all learn to play with them? I find it to be extremely hard, but I haven't yet tried enough and I barely hear the click while using them. Aiming to learn it next week when we'll try to record some stuff. Any tips? I was thinking I'd take it home and do some table drumming just to get used to playing according to it.

For the thread starter, welcome and sorry for borrowing your topic! :)
don't hear the click? get some headphones :)
Even if I hear the click I still have trouble keeping the tempo with it. In fact I think I can keep the tempo better by hearing a melody, but then again I cannot prove that without someone else using a metronome. I always get off tempo when I try and so far it's the only thing that has ever frustrated me with drumming. :D
 

SGarrett

New member
eml":8pyxhhrf said:
tero":8pyxhhrf said:
eml":8pyxhhrf said:
Speaking of metronomes, how did y'all learn to play with them? I find it to be extremely hard, but I haven't yet tried enough and I barely hear the click while using them. Aiming to learn it next week when we'll try to record some stuff. Any tips? I was thinking I'd take it home and do some table drumming just to get used to playing according to it.

For the thread starter, welcome and sorry for borrowing your topic! :)
don't hear the click? get some headphones :)
Even if I hear the click I still have trouble keeping the tempo with it. In fact I think I can keep the tempo better by hearing a melody, but then again I cannot prove that without someone else using a metronome. I always get off tempo when I try and so far it's the only thing that has ever frustrated me with drumming. :D
You're trying too hard and actually fighting against the click. Work on relaxing. Instead of trying to jump right into playing songs/beats/patterns, start with basic hand and foot exercises. First, turn the click on and just listen to it. Tap along with the quarter notes, let your body start to feel the pulse so your ears can hear it. Play quarter notes with your feet while playing alternating 8th and 16th notes with your hands. Then do the same thing with your hands while playing 8th with your right foot and still quarters with your left foot. Do this at a very slow tempo. You aren't trying to win a race, you're trying to get comfortable with the click. Slower is much better for that. Do that for a few minutes and then play the simplest pattern you know. Don't concentrate on the click but listen for the pulse and try to cover it up with the kick and snare. If possible, set your metronome to 8th or 16th notes so you can feel the proper spacing.

You won't get this over-night, but with honest and consistent practice you'll be working with a click in no time.
 

dbkman

New member
Mikeslessons.com

99 cents a lesson. And the best money can buy. This guy rocks. You can also find him on youtube. Mike johnston. Good luck. God speed. and ear plugs.
 

eml

New member
SGarrett":2mo3bel1 said:
eml":2mo3bel1 said:
tero":2mo3bel1 said:
eml":2mo3bel1 said:
Speaking of metronomes, how did y'all learn to play with them? I find it to be extremely hard, but I haven't yet tried enough and I barely hear the click while using them. Aiming to learn it next week when we'll try to record some stuff. Any tips? I was thinking I'd take it home and do some table drumming just to get used to playing according to it.

For the thread starter, welcome and sorry for borrowing your topic! :)
don't hear the click? get some headphones :)
Even if I hear the click I still have trouble keeping the tempo with it. In fact I think I can keep the tempo better by hearing a melody, but then again I cannot prove that without someone else using a metronome. I always get off tempo when I try and so far it's the only thing that has ever frustrated me with drumming. :D
You're trying too hard and actually fighting against the click. Work on relaxing. Instead of trying to jump right into playing songs/beats/patterns, start with basic hand and foot exercises. First, turn the click on and just listen to it. Tap along with the quarter notes, let your body start to feel the pulse so your ears can hear it. Play quarter notes with your feet while playing alternating 8th and 16th notes with your hands. Then do the same thing with your hands while playing 8th with your right foot and still quarters with your left foot. Do this at a very slow tempo. You aren't trying to win a race, you're trying to get comfortable with the click. Slower is much better for that. Do that for a few minutes and then play the simplest pattern you know. Don't concentrate on the click but listen for the pulse and try to cover it up with the kick and snare. If possible, set your metronome to 8th or 16th notes so you can feel the proper spacing.

You won't get this over-night, but with honest and consistent practice you'll be working with a click in no time.
The metronome I have only gives me one click (as in full notes), do you suggest I get another one? This one should do the trick for just learning it, but I suppose a better one couldn't hurt. It's actually not my own metronome, it's the guitarist's. He kind of laughed at me when I was going to buy a metronome for 60$, are they worth it?

And thank you for the tips of course. I have been kind of fighting against it indeed. You really feel stupid when someone has to tell you to work like this. :D
 

SGarrett

New member
eml":36kr8noo said:
The metronome I have only gives me one click (as in full notes), do you suggest I get another one? This one should do the trick for just learning it, but I suppose a better one couldn't hurt. It's actually not my own metronome, it's the guitarist's. He kind of laughed at me when I was going to buy a metronome for 60$, are they worth it?

And thank you for the tips of course. I have been kind of fighting against it indeed. You really feel stupid when someone has to tell you to work like this. :D
Don't feel stupid, we've all been there. :)

I spent $100 on a Tama Rhythm Watch and don't regret it at all. What you have will more than get your going. When I first started, this was the kind of metronome I had; http://store.musicbasics.com/met-wsm-330-solid-purple.html... only it was white.
 

okjohne

New member
When I was studying music in school a piano player convinced me to practice claping to a metronone. Just one clap for every click. Sounds easy right. Next sing rythims or songs with your clap. This will help trust me.
 

SGarrett

New member
okjohne":21rxl4jp said:
When I was studying music in school a piano player convinced me to practice claping to a metronone. Just one clap for every click. Sounds easy right. Next sing rythims or songs with your clap. This will help trust me.
Oh yeah. I totally forgot about that. That's similar to what Gary Chester recommended.
 

shrub

New member
the trick too learning with a metronome is instead of watching it and keeping up with it, try to subcontiously play with it.
this is gonna sound cheesy as hell, but try to become one with the metronome, almost in a sense like a jam session.
dont let you or it take the lead, just flow together. I hope any of that made sense to anyone but me.
 

Metal Mickey

New member
Thanks for the advice. One more question:

I've looked on Google but it's probably best to ask you lot so I can get a specific answer. My triplets sound better when I'm using the silencer pads, probably because it doesn't resound and echo as much; so I'm wondering if putting something inside each tom would be a good idea (a cushion or something) as to dampen that echo. And if it is, how do I put it inside without damaging my drums? There's already a couple of cushions inside my bass drum but it came like that, and I have to say my bass does give quite a 'thud' instead of a 'boom' which is why I'm thinking cushions in the toms might work.

Thanks.
 

Alan_

New member
Metronome good!

Also let me recommend: Stick Control by George Lawrence Stone. That book is a treasure trove of exercises that will help you with stamina and being able to use different sticking combinations creatively.

Tuning: I try to never dampen my toms unless I'm recording and in a time crunch and the room sounds like total crap.
 

eml

New member
shrub":26r5v8b6 said:
the trick too learning with a metronome is instead of watching it and keeping up with it, try to subcontiously play with it.
this is gonna sound cheesy as hell, but try to become one with the metronome, almost in a sense like a jam session.
dont let you or it take the lead, just flow together. I hope any of that made sense to anyone but me.
Yeah, if I would keep forgetting it I'd have it at home already jamming on my laps with it. :)
Thanks for the tips everyone!
 
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