Trigger

killdrum1983

New member
I don't use any but i've already spoken about this with one of my friend. Do you use any on your bass drum heads? Is it usefull? does it change anything? I don't know much about it...
 

Flatliner

New member
I don't use triggers, I can see situations where they would be appropriate, but I've never been in one where I needed them.
 

killdrum1983

New member
Flatliner":23xjpkfa said:
I don't use triggers, I can see situations where they would be appropriate, but I've never been in one where I needed them.
ah ok i was just wondering cause we talked about that with a friend i has a weird sound on the cd we can hear like a tic tic tic tic if the drummer uses one... i wanted to have your opinion about that :)

sorry if i put this onto the wrong section :/
 

drummert2k

New member
i trigger simply picks up the attack when you hit the head and sends the signal to a "brain" where you program what sound you want.

and that tic tic thing you heard on the cd could have been a metal kick pad on the kick drum, wooden or plastic beaters or even possibly the bass guitar. it may have also been a triggered bass drum or just an effect the added to the kick in the studio.
 

scepticILL

New member
Personally I like listening to drumming that has not been triggered, but it's really not very practical on metal - especially in extreme metal. It's just really hard to get a loud sounds when playing at high speeds. It would be great if there was a way to get some dynamics out of triggering...
 

StranGeL

New member
It took me a long time to finally try out triggers. I do use them sometimes now, but I never make that decision on which group I'm playing with (metal,jazz,hip-hop etc...)....I make that decision based on the sound engineer and the p.a system. I gig a lot, and often you run into some of the crappiest soundsystems with bad sound guys. By having the trigger all they have to do is turn the volume up. Also, when you play a venue that has a lot of bands that night, by having the trigger cuts your set-up time in half. Just plug and play. Like I said it depends on the situation. To the other reply, if you use a ddrum trigger with a vdrum module, you can adjust it to have a decent response for dynamics.
 

killdrum1983

New member
StranGeL":7yjme49q said:
It took me a long time to finally try out triggers. I do use them sometimes now, but I never make that decision on which group I'm playing with (metal,jazz,hip-hop etc...)....I make that decision based on the sound engineer and the p.a system. I gig a lot, and often you run into some of the crappiest soundsystems with bad sound guys. By having the trigger all they have to do is turn the volume up. Also, when you play a venue that has a lot of bands that night, by having the trigger cuts your set-up time in half. Just plug and play. Like I said it depends on the situation. To the other reply, if you use a ddrum trigger with a vdrum module, you can adjust it to have a decent response for dynamics.
I think i'll try it one day cause it seems like it's good if you wanna have a proper kick sound. My friend said it was easier if you play with it (maybe because you don't have to hit that hard) but i think it's cool to use it to have a better sound... And easier or not... :? I think you have to hit the kickdrums anyway so... :D
 

iatemygoat

New member
i recently played two shows in Iowa and every bands drummer used them except me. eventually id like to get one for my bass drum and thats probably it.

anyone know what kind of set up is involved other than the trigger itself? preferably a cheap one haha.
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
Bass Drum triggers are extremely useful with fast tempo double bass playing. As most venues don't have good engineers or equipment, triggers give you and even sound from both beaters, reguardless of how hard you kick your damn head. Example: Kicking hard or just lightly taping the bass drum with triggers produces the exact same sound at the exact same volume. Also cheap mics tend not to pick up higher tempos 250+ and just sound muttered. Also, triggers are useful in having your kicks "CUT THROUGH THE MIX" which is phenominal!
 

m

New member
scepticILL":8f70eaus said:
It would be great if there was a way to get some dynamics out of triggering...
There is, and it is great!

Granted, it involves high-end, pricey gear, but you can get plenty of dynamics and sensitivity out of triggers. It really depends on the module, not the triggers themselves. I've used Ddrum, & Roland modules, and trigger-to-midi interfaces of various brands that provide an excellent range of dynamics.
I find that you do get what you pay for in the E-drum realm, but if you have the budget, there is gear that does a good job of translating the nuances in your playing style.

I suppose the most common use of triggers is the double-bass solution for removing dynamics, and allowing each hit to sound exactly the same, but that's not the only option. Others use them on toms, snares, etc, to avoid miking issues, or to have other tonal options available while still playing an acoustic kit.

Triggers aren't just for 'cheating.' Takes a little work to dial them in, but with a good module or TMI they can be really useful.
 

Kaos

New member
I just recently upgraded my set up and I've got an alesis d4 and a set of brand new still in package except oneddrum redshot triggers for sale Im gonna put em on the bay but Ill give yout guys first shot Ill take 350.00 shipped for the whole deal. email me at cory@subtlekaos.com if interested.
 

twisteddrummer

New member
The most frustrating thing about using triggers is that most live sound engineers won't mix them correctly. I quit hauling mine around a long time ago as I'm not going to risk damaging my expensive electronics when the club's engineer (and I use the term loosely)won't take advantage of the tones I'm providing him.
Playing triggers is NOT cheating. If you set them correctly you can pull an extremely dynamic performance with triggers while still getting an accurate performance at higher speeds. Keeping your triggers from double triggering at low speeds while tracking accurately at high speeds is an art form. Anyone who calls using triggers cheating hasn't tried playing them. (they also probably are glad that their kicks sound like sludge at over 100b.p.m.)
 

Rockula!

New member
I have my triggers hooked up to electrodes that shock my balls
That way, I don't go overboard with double bass
Just enough to make it pleasant but not so much that they become numb which defeats the purpose of shocking my balls in the first place
 

EyeJuan2Rock

New member
Rockula! said:
I have my triggers hooked up to electrodes that shock my balls
That way, I don't go overboard with double bass
Just enough to make it pleasant but not so much that they become numb which defeats the purpose of shocking my balls in the first place
The ball shocking is all well and good, but I would stay away from the probes. :p

[/u]
 

ticul

New member
drummert2k":3inc6pn4 said:
i trigger simply picks up the attack when you hit the head and sends the signal to a "brain" where you program what sound you want.

and that tic tic thing you heard on the cd could have been a metal kick pad on the kick drum, wooden or plastic beaters or even possibly the bass guitar. it may have also been a triggered bass drum or just an effect the added to the kick in the studio.
It's a midi signal
 

drumminal

New member
I play in a cover band where the triggers are save the day. Were a three piece and control everything from stage (sound, lights, effects...) With the triggers it works out great. However, I suggest getting good ones and have a GOOD PA. I'm using ddrum pro. Now the only mic to deal with is the high hat. With this setup every man walks with great pay, since we don't have to hire sound.
 
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