Tips for a healthy back

Funkussionist

New member
Nick Cetrone":31lf9vjk said:
tama throne with a backrest...saved my life
Look at the throne in my profile pic. I've had it a couple of months and it is the best throne I've ever used.
Tama HT741 Ergorider quartet with backrest.

Also - an observation. Almost all of the people I know who have ongoing back problems are also overweight.
 

Alan_

New member
Funkussionist":1i7tsffc said:
Nick Cetrone":1i7tsffc said:
tama throne with a backrest...saved my life
Look at the throne in my profile pic. I've had it a couple of months and it is the best throne I've ever used.
Tama HT741 Ergorider quartet with backrest.

Also - an observation. Almost all of the people I know who have ongoing back problems are also overweight.
I was in a car accident, and have back problems from that. After I sit down on a drumkit and play for a few, my back loosens up and I feel much better. Drumming seems to do nothing but make my back feel better.
 

percussle

New member
BillRayDrums":3kwnqk2h said:
Atmerrill":3kwnqk2h said:
Good points on posture and all - but what about tonage?

Most of my back pains about 5 years ago wasn't caused by posture, but by the gross weight of gear I was schleping around - specifically stands. I was playing DW 9000 series stands. At one point I was bringing (3) cymbal stands, hi-hat, snare, tom stand, seat, and pedals. Got to the point I couldn't pick-up my stand case in the truck. Made the decision then that a 12 pound cymbal stand to hold a .75 lb cymbal was stupid. Went out the next day and bought the Gibraltar flat-base series snare and cymbal stands, and pulled my old Slingerland Dynamo Hi-hat out of the closet. Even got a Tama single braced seat stand for the DW seat top.

Now, I use two mic stand cases for my stands. One case has just cymbal stands, and the other seat, snare, hi-hat and floor tom legs. Both cases are light, and my back is a hell-of-a-lot more happy.

Also - I guess this is where I show my age: I remember growing up playing the old ludwig flat base cymbal stands. They always had a built-in tilt, so you learned how to hit your crashes properly or your stand did a "timber" on you and hit the floor. I also remember when Tama first came out with their Titan series in the mid 1970's. I couldn't wait to get them and I remember how proud I was to get a complete set of them for the set. I also remember distinctly that it was at that point my dad stopped helping me carrying any stand. He said, "you want 'em, you carry 'em." Then, I thought he was making a fuss about nothing. Today (at 45), I know what the fuss was about.
The Schlep in/out is part of the "exercise" portion of my program. But yeah, I get to feelin' the effects of age nowadays. I just try and ignore the small creaks and such.


hmmm.. i get small creaks and such at 19, mainly in my right leg (where the hip joins the leg in the socket) and my ankle just cracks, sometimes ya can hear it but most of the time ya can just feel it. and gets annoying. i might have to do more exercises to stop these creaks, cracks in my right leg, ankle, knee, also my wrists.
i even wear a ankle brace thing that ya slip on to make it feel stronger

as for my back im trying hard to correct my posture all the time. i might have to increase the height of my throne a little bit. thanks for the help bill man.
but was there anyone else experiencing those weird little pains, cracks, and creaks in other parts of the body such as the arms and legs?
 

Gaddabout

New member
Playing anything with DW hardware on it is a good way to develop back problems. Also, don't use a solid shell kit as your primary gigging kit. Pretty much leave the rack at home.

Did you ever notice bop drummers never seem to have back problems? Except Alan Dawson, but he was in an accident or something.

My best advice? Once you hit 30, stop aging. I hit 38 last May and it was the worst decision of my life.
 

keith bushey

New member
Any drummers primary goal should'nt be sound...that will come later, it should be comfort! Take care of yourself! For years I concerned myself with sound, and "cool". I was always sore in the pants after 1 hr! Finally I broke down and bought a Roc-n-Soc Nitro throne. Amen! Its the best seat in the house!!
 

drumkingkid

New member
Totally correct!!!!!

In the long run it's always good to have good posture not only for your health but it also helps and improves your drumming.

Ever since I corrected my posture while playing (3 years ago) not only did my playing get better but the stamina I had man I could got through a whole setlist like a walk in the park it just relaxes your muscles.

I got a whole lot of drummer friends and I spoke to them about this and well only about 3% actually took it to consideration and other half well you know what happened why tell you! :p
 

liquidrummr

New member
Homki890":1tw13voc said:
Squats and dead lifts man. I've been playing tenors for five years now. That's roughly 75 pounds of drums on my shoulders. I've found that dead lifts and squats drastically improve the lower back area, and helps strengthen both the shoulders and back, for better posture.

Shoes are also important. As said, high-heeled shoes are bad. Converse are almost as bad. Completely flat sole, no arch support. That lead to some serious foot problems in the long run (I'll still wear them though, just not as often). If you want to get good shoues, try to find a foot health store, or go online. Look up Earth Shoes, specially with the negative heel. They are the comfiest shoes in the world. Plus, with the negative heel, it actually helps fix bad posture, by straighting your back. Weird, but it works.

There's my 2 cents.

Homki890
Great article. I'm also a proponent of back strengthening excercises. I find that working out gives your whole body a lift.
 

b b253

New member
i gotta question tho, does a seat with backrest give more support then one without like just the bycicle throne?
 

Nehe555

New member
as one who quit his office job because of developing back problems and the onset symptoms of carpel tunnel, I can't stress enough the importance of posture and stretching. Have you noticed how many aggressive drummers are very built? Take travis barker as an example. He's got a slim build, but he's ripped. He needs to be to keep playing so hard. Be careful when lifting though, because lifting can convert fast-twitch muscles to slow-twitch, which is not something drummers want. We want to develop fast-twitch for those 4 bar single stroke fills. Instead of working out, I've realized that stretching in the morning and evening makes me feel much better, and I last longer on the drumkit. Stretching in the mornings doesn't mean you don't stretch before playing. You can never stretch too much. Atom Willard explains some great stretches he does before his gigs. Basically, he stretches the neck, shoulder, and arms because these muscle groups are all related. In other words, a tense neck can affect your playing. Posture is the other thing, and I'm surprised no one's mentioned this yet. If your back hurts from playing, you could be reaching or slouching. Your drumkit could be setup too low, so raise those toms and snare drum. That'll force you to sit up straighter, or else you'll hit the rim with your hand.
 

Nehe555

New member
BillRayDrums":22949c7k said:
Atmerrill":22949c7k said:
Good points on posture and all - but what about tonage?

Most of my back pains about 5 years ago wasn't caused by posture, but by the gross weight of gear I was schleping around - specifically stands. I was playing DW 9000 series stands. At one point I was bringing (3) cymbal stands, hi-hat, snare, tom stand, seat, and pedals. Got to the point I couldn't pick-up my stand case in the truck. Made the decision then that a 12 pound cymbal stand to hold a .75 lb cymbal was stupid. Went out the next day and bought the Gibraltar flat-base series snare and cymbal stands, and pulled my old Slingerland Dynamo Hi-hat out of the closet. Even got a Tama single braced seat stand for the DW seat top.

Now, I use two mic stand cases for my stands. One case has just cymbal stands, and the other seat, snare, hi-hat and floor tom legs. Both cases are light, and my back is a hell-of-a-lot more happy.
you make a good point there about hardware weight. i've been trying to find some articles online about hardware weight comparisons, but i can find nothing. i'm thinking of switching out all my hardware to something lighter. i've heard that gibraltar hardware is light, but i wanna see some numbers! should we all go around and weigh our hardware and post the results?
 

vincemie

New member
i once took a private lesson from bernard purdie he pointed out that i slouch and stuck his fist into my lower back everytime i catch myself slouching i feel his fist straightening my back out for me.
 

PHANTOM PATRIOT

New member
ONE OF MY BASS PLAYIN FRIENDS IS A MASSAGE THERAPIST. HE TOLD ME THIS.
...LETS IMAGINE YOUR HEAD WEIGHS 10 LBS, FOR EVERY INCH AWAY FROM STREIGHT GRAVITY ADDS THE WEIGHT OF YOUR HEAD...... SO IF WHILE SLOUCHING YOUR HEAD IS 2" IN FRONT OF STRAIGHT, YOUR NECK IS HOLDING 30LBS OF WEIGHT
 

grannydrums

New member
I spend the first half hour of my drum practice sitting on an excercise ball, I think it has helped to strengthen the muscles you use to keep a good posture. I dont have a back to my stool, but i have put an old stand behind me with a padded sock at the end of the arm position where i can feel it if i sit up straight, its a little reminder of how i should be sitting. I have some old mirrors at either side of me so that I can check all the things my teacher nags me about, posture, arm higth, etc. If the band are not there i sometimes play with a full length mirror in from too-- it realy points out bad habits(and silly expressions on my face!!)I fins it helps to be aware of where each hip bone is and wether or not each shoulder bone is square above it, and without straining try to think of the shoulders being another 2 or 3 inches higher by lengthening the back.
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Nehe555":1yfun2xc said:
BillRayDrums":1yfun2xc said:
Atmerrill":1yfun2xc said:
Good points on posture and all - but what about tonage?

Most of my back pains about 5 years ago wasn't caused by posture, but by the gross weight of gear I was schleping around - specifically stands. I was playing DW 9000 series stands. At one point I was bringing (3) cymbal stands, hi-hat, snare, tom stand, seat, and pedals. Got to the point I couldn't pick-up my stand case in the truck. Made the decision then that a 12 pound cymbal stand to hold a .75 lb cymbal was stupid. Went out the next day and bought the Gibraltar flat-base series snare and cymbal stands, and pulled my old Slingerland Dynamo Hi-hat out of the closet. Even got a Tama single braced seat stand for the DW seat top.

Now, I use two mic stand cases for my stands. One case has just cymbal stands, and the other seat, snare, hi-hat and floor tom legs. Both cases are light, and my back is a hell-of-a-lot more happy.
you make a good point there about hardware weight. i've been trying to find some articles online about hardware weight comparisons, but i can find nothing. i'm thinking of switching out all my hardware to something lighter. i've heard that gibraltar hardware is light, but i wanna see some numbers! should we all go around and weigh our hardware and post the results?
Who cares about weight (tonnage)? You are essentially carrying what you are comfortable with to a gig. For me if weight were an issue I would get single-braced stands and also clean the 50 or so red flyers from a gig in 2005 from my trapcase that seem to still linger, no matter how hard I try to pass them along. Oh yeah then there's the drawings that people threw in 15 years ago into my tom cases.
My setup has not changed in about 20 years....Double braced stuff and I don't use a cart because I enjoy the exercise. 5 trips to the car? No problem because that's my exercise regimen right there. Humping my shit through whatever obstacle course is presented. I'm pushing 40 and I'll stack up against anyone. :) Even Stump, that little running maniac that he is.
 

grannydrums

New member
i am a little old lady(I will admit to 60) I make lots of trips with my gear and then when I have finished help the band with their stuff, these young lads are very slow. I cannot manage the bass amp by myself but will give the rest a go. If i can pick it up by using my legs rather than my back I will take it. I used to use double braced DW stands for the toms but have recently got a gibralter rack. Lightweight, quick to set up, takes up less room on stage and looks realy cool
 

40th

New member
this is funny. Just the other day I was thinking about improving my movements around my set. I was sure I could do better by making some adjustments and start to get picky about how I sit at my kit. It has definately added some benefit to my skills. Sitting up helps to, but making sure everything is the proper height and reach...Im golden now!

Next is to practice more... :(
 

grannydrums

New member
actually my band say i look more like a MILF--when they are not screaming about how much room I take up. Thats probably why they hide me behind the amps, dont like the band looking if the drummer sent his granny along
 
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