Thoughts On Aaron Gillespie

Buddylee78

New member
First off - this will probably get pretty wordy and i apologize in advance - I have a lot to say about this show/band in general so I'm sorry for all the detail - but i'm sure someone will hopefully want to hear about it

As of 5 days ago, my views toward drumming officially changed.

I had high hopes for sure, going to a sold out show in Kansas City, with Armor for Sleep, Taking Back Sunday, and the reason i went - Underoath.
I left that show completely satisfied and amazed.

If anyone's seen Underoath live then you know exactly what i'm talking about. The energy is undeniable.

After Armor For Sleep's set, they cleared off the drum kit and all their stuff and started setting up UO gear. Knowing that UO just got off a huge European tour with Aaron's green acrylic kit - i was pretty suprised and at the same time - completely expecting - that he had a brand new kit this time around. A five piece flat black Truth kit, 12 by 8, 16 by 16, and i'm guessing 18 by 18. I also know his snare is a 14 by 8 Hybrid.
He had a huge kick drum 24 by 22? and the first subwoofer i've seen Truth put on their kits. On top of that he had a 21" Medium Ride above the rack tom, A 22" Heavy Ride on the far right, and a 24" Prototype Heavy Ride between the two. (all Meinl Byzance)

The lights went out and i couldn't have been more pumped. I've been a fan of Underoath for a while and this was my first time seeing them live. They actually came to Wichita last summer but i was out on tour at the time.

Their intro song started up (An epic speech about Sparta - i think from the movie 300 - i'm not sure though) and all the guys came out. I'm not sure how to describe it but they bring a presence all their own out to the stage - i'm not even gonna try to explain it

If you wanna hear about each individual song i'll be more than happy to share but i figure the general public on here could care less so i'll just do a general rundown.

First off - the sound was unreal. I've never heard drums sound bigger and fuller than his. They had huge attack, HUGE resonance. It was perfect. More important- i was extremely well balanced. I could hear absolutely every hit, as well as every vocal part (he sings if you didn't know). The precision, timing, feel, sound, just the presence of the whole band was spot on. You could tell they take a lot of time looking through their songs and finding a set list that works.

Aaron has a stage presence that I have never seen before. Any live show, or any video i've seen - nothing came close (i know i haven't seen it all - so this is from what I"VE seen) He was energetic about everything, even getting to the point of boucing on his snare drum and then at another point literally jumping on his bass drum pedals.

He even broke TWO of his 24" Rides. You're all drummers so you know how hard it would be to break something like that.

As far as technique goes - he hits just ridiculously hard, but it makes sense for the music they play. He's passionate about his playing and expresses himself very clearly. One of the best things, in my opinion, is his fills (both the fast foot / hand combos) as well as the spaces he leaves.

And he doesn't over use his double bass - which i really really like. I don't play double bass but i definately respect guys that use it in a way that adds to their music - and not to define it.


I know a lot of people don't like "screaming" music, and to be honest - i'm not a huuuge fan either. But these guys write amazing music, all for a good reason and for a great purpose. I think it would be hard (even if you've never heard of them) to leave that theater without respecting the show they put on. This goes up their in the most memorable concerts of my life and i'm sure it will be that way till i see them again.

Feel free to write your opinions, thoughts, whatnot. And if you want to know more about the show just ask - i could go on forever. I also have videos of about 8 of the songs that a friend of mine took from the balcony.
 

Howepirate

New member
Aarons the man and so is UO. I listen to many respectable music styles and am largely into very tasteful and very hard music. I also love underoath and many bands of that genre as well as much harder music. I have to respect Aaron very much he fits in their music so well and is so energetic and applicable to his genre its amazing...
 

Pnkdrmmr

New member
My band is really good friends with As Cities Burn, they are from our hometown, so when my band happened to be in the same town as the day that UO and ACB were on tour together we thought "screw trying to battle that show, let's go watch".

Since we knew ACB they got us backstage and i got to sit DIRECTLY behind Aaron during UO's set, barely extending my arm i would have touched his Gong drum(set as a floor tom). I could see the whole crowd (i'll say 2000 kids) going nuts.

i've never seen anyone play as hard as him, but understand this, he wasn't beating his drums, i think it's called the Moeller Technique, when you "pull" the sound out of the drums... idk.

Along with that, everything he played was perfect, i asked one of the guys from ACB about it and he said that he had sat behind Aaron every night the whole tour and he only messed up twice, their stuff isn't that easy.

After the show, we got to meet UO and they were the nicest guys. They knew from ACB that we were on the road as well so they gave us ALL of their rider food, must have been $50 worth of it. Aaron actually walked up to me and asked if it was ok that he took a water they gave us, i'm not gonna lie, i expected them to be jerks.
 

Buddylee78

New member
the moeller (spelling?) technique is a multiple stroke technique
unless i'm mistaken...

and that's sweet that you got to stand there

We're actually playing with As Cities Burn here in Wichita - April 22 i think is the date
should be fun
 

Pnkdrmmr

New member
You're probably right, i know nothing of drum terms.

Dude, that's sweet.

Our old guitarist for my band just joined them.

We'll be playing Wichita in a couple weeks with Widow&Orphans from Texas, at the Electric Snake.

You should come check out the show!
 

screamBRYAN

New member
Aaron Gillespie is definitely my favorite drummer atm, very inspirational drummer to me this past year. I sort of "adopted" his playing style, though I will not tread the lines of saying I'm even halfway as good as him.
 

Gaddabout

New member
Buddylee78":1giscqag said:
the moeller (spelling?) technique is a multiple stroke technique
Yes, sort of. Moeller was invented when snare drummers were playing loosely tightened calf heads and logs for sticks. No rebound. You had to high stick and use your fingers to coax the stick's inertia to do more work for you. You didn't have things like drummer's suffering carpal tunnel syndrome back then, for sure.

It's evolved quite a bit, but remains one of the most practical, useful, and healthy ways to strike a drum. As head and drum technology became more advanced, drummers like Buddy Rich learned how to utilize this old school technique to their advantage.

There's another technique called finger control which, when applied with Moeller, can turn your sticks into explosive devices. One drummer I think a lot of you can relate to is Derek Roddy. He's a finger control guy, although he really needs to employ Moeller, too, because he's got no power behind all those notes.
 

AKforYou

New member
Aaron is an awesome drummer. No to mention a good singer also.. Using his two talents together is just awesome. He is a good member for his band Underoath. I admire him for his skills.

Well, i can drum ok, all i need to do is sing well haha or maybe learn how to play guitar
 
Gaddabout":21xjxagk said:
Buddylee78":21xjxagk said:
the moeller (spelling?) technique is a multiple stroke technique
Yes, sort of. Moeller was invented when snare drummers were playing loosely tightened calf heads and logs for sticks. No rebound. You had to high stick and use your fingers to coax the stick's inertia to do more work for you. You didn't have things like drummer's suffering carpal tunnel syndrome back then, for sure.

It's evolved quite a bit, but remains one of the most practical, useful, and healthy ways to strike a drum. As head and drum technology became more advanced, drummers like Buddy Rich learned how to utilize this old school technique to their advantage.

There's another technique called finger control which, when applied with Moeller, can turn your sticks into explosive devices. One drummer I think a lot of you can relate to is Derek Roddy. He's a finger control guy, although he really needs to employ Moeller, too, because he's got no power behind all those notes.
Quoted for truth. Anyone who tells you you should use your whole arm while playing drums is missing out, because they just don't know about Moeller.

If you flat stroke with your whole arm, that's another story. Have fun losing lots of weight, tearing lots of muscles, and still not being half as loud.
 
Oh, and for anyone curious, Moeller technique is a way of utilizing your whole arm as a whip, so you can put the velocity of your whole arm into your stick in a very efficient way. The result is a stroke that's very powerful, but also very cooperative with the head (aka, lots of sound without busting heads.)

It can also be used for executing triple stroke rolls. The idea is that as you pull your arm up during the first part of the whip motion, you get an extra stroke in that's powered kind of from your elbow.
 
Hy Great Topic Ive been thinking about posting the same question on here! Their Only Chasing Safety is probly still my favorite cd at the time i know i ts there old on but its an amazing cd high energy meanigful. Its very hard yet it has a smoothness to it which what attracks me to music. That cd alone turned Underoath in to my fav band then once i got into more and more i couldnt overlook the amazing drummin. Aaron is now one of my favorite drummers. Im kinda new school in away First Influence was Travis Barker, Brandon Steineckert, Mark O connell, Now AAron fits right up there with one of the drummers i respect the most actually prolly more then the others. I think its hard as hell to sing and play But he does it with some really technical drum parts AMAZING sorry if i wrote alot and it doesnt all go well together but like i said i been wanting to bring the topic up Im glad someone did
 

quikstang2

New member
Aaron is a really cool dude. I met the original Underoath + Timmy at a small club called The Tab in Melbourne, FL. Back then new was playing a birch kit that he loved because it was LOUD! Chris got his face smashed in by one of the guitars... really small stage... but he finished the show. Dallas also lit his chest on fire for the opening of The Last.
He absolutely hates all the "metal" drumming he did on their first two CDs. So we differ greatly on our approach to drumming. But we still respect each other.
Since then I saw the new Underoath at The Revolution in Ft. Lauderdale, FL back when the concerts were inside and I stood on the upper level above Aaron's set and watched for a while. It's easy to see how he breaks his rides considering their size, how he hits them and that he uses them as crashes.

Other than that I've gotten to jam with Octavio a few times, especially when he was thinking about moving down here and he wanted to go over song ideas with me (I was the closest available drummer with a guitar cab for him to plug hi new head into). I've also hung out with him a couple times since then.

All the Underoath guys are super cool dudes.
 

Howepirate

New member
bignickonthedrum":1alejitf said:
Gaddabout":1alejitf said:
Buddylee78":1alejitf said:
the moeller (spelling?) technique is a multiple stroke technique
Yes, sort of. Moeller was invented when snare drummers were playing loosely tightened calf heads and logs for sticks. No rebound. You had to high stick and use your fingers to coax the stick's inertia to do more work for you. You didn't have things like drummer's suffering carpal tunnel syndrome back then, for sure.

It's evolved quite a bit, but remains one of the most practical, useful, and healthy ways to strike a drum. As head and drum technology became more advanced, drummers like Buddy Rich learned how to utilize this old school technique to their advantage.

There's another technique called finger control which, when applied with Moeller, can turn your sticks into explosive devices. One drummer I think a lot of you can relate to is Derek Roddy. He's a finger control guy, although he really needs to employ Moeller, too, because he's got no power behind all those notes.
Quoted for truth. Anyone who tells you you should use your whole arm while playing drums is missing out, because they just don't know about Moeller.

If you flat stroke with your whole arm, that's another story. Have fun losing lots of weight, tearing lots of muscles, and still not being half as loud.
Theres technique in this to..not always do people lose a ton of weight rip muscles and arent as loud...

people can develop their own techniques

stop being an ignoramus
 
Top