The Weather and your drums.

Deanoatc

New member
How do you feel about temperature when playing your drums? Did you know that all you need is a rapid temperature change of 15 degrees to break a cymbal while playing? so in the summer that is usually Sunset, and in the winter it is moving your drums from the cold into the heat. How does it affect the drum itself, and the head, and the hardware? What do you think? I have had experiences with equipment malfunctioning due to the temperature. Have you?
 

Deanoatc

New member
zen_drummer":3bxd4bkb said:
Deanoatc":3bxd4bkb said:
Did you know that all you need is a rapid temperature change of 15 degrees to break a cymbal while playing?
This statement is absolutely nonsense...
hey Zen Drummer, if this is nonsense, then Why has it happened to me and a few other Drummers I know. I have experienced it first hand, and now I watch things like that because I can't afford to buy new cymbals all the time. I did some math and realized that every situation was caused by a rapid temp change of 15 degrees. when I say rapid I mean over a course of 1/2 hour. You don't have to agree, I just figured I would share my experiences. Be a little nicer. You don't need to be so rude when replying to a topic.
 

kplante069

New member
Temperature will effect any accoustical instrument. It's going to effect drums as much as guitars. And sudden temp changes are worse. It's basic physics. If you have to travel with your kit try to get into the place your playing and let it warm up before you play it.
 

zen_drummer

New member
Deanoatc":2oeodmt0 said:
hey Zen Drummer, if this is nonsense, then Why has it happened to me and a few other Drummers I know. I have experienced it first hand, and now I watch things like that because I can't afford to buy new cymbals all the time. I did some math and realized that every situation was caused by a rapid temp change of 15 degrees. when I say rapid I mean over a course of 1/2 hour. You don't have to agree, I just figured I would share my experiences. Be a little nicer. You don't need to be so rude when replying to a topic.
I live in Rochester NY, we're famous for lots of snow and REALLY cold weather in the winter. My band has a trailer, it's not heated, and it's stored outside, and most of our gear is in the trailer for the entire week. Last week, the temp got down to 1 degree below zero, with wind chillls into the negative teens.

On Saturday night, I played a gig, and my drums and cymbals went from the cold of the trailer to the heat of the stage in less than twenty minutes. We do this all winter long. Now think about the rise in temperature... from below zero to above 85 degrees in less than a half an hour! Like I said, we do this all winter long. I have never broken a cymbal under these conditions, in fact the only cymbals I have ever broken have been a few wuhan chinas from time to time, and they break by looking at them funny, and interestingly enough, I don't recall ever breaking one in the winter.

Now, I'm not saying you didn't break a cymbal... what I AM saying is that it is HIGHLY unlikely that it was caused by a rapid rise in temperature over a short period of time. In fact, I think the concept of that is completely absurd.

I happen to be a research analyst for a living, and there is a concept called a "spurious relationship". It's a relationship that appears to exist at face value, but that disappears when you control for another variable...

I'll give you an example. Assume for a moment we do not know the cause of getting drunk, and we do a little experiment to see if we can discover the cause...

You drank vodka and water. What Happened? Got drunk....
You drank rum and water. What Happened? Got drunk.... .
You drank scotch and water. What Happened? Got drunk....
You drank bourbon and water. What Happened? Got drunk....
You drank gin and water. What Happened? Got drunk....

If you look at the pattern of your data you will see that the water appeared in every instance in which you got drunk, while no other factor appears to remain in every case. Based on that evidence, you could conclude that water made you drunk. Now, we all know that wated won't make you drunk, but alcohol sure will, and each of the substances combined with the water contained alcohol. The conclusion that water makes you drunk is spurious. By looking for other variables and other patterns we find that alcohol is the culprit variable.

Again, I do believe your cymbal broke and I believe that there was a rapid rise or decrease in temperature. I further belive that the correlation between the two is highly suspect because of the following:

MANY people bring there drums in from the FRIGID cold and start playing immediately with absolutely no ill-effect. Further, MANY people break cymbals in climate controlled situations.

There is however, an interesting aside to all of this. In Nebraska there is a Cryogenics lab that claims that brass instruments as well as bronze cymbals can benefit greatly by cryogenically freezing them to 300 degrees below zero for a couple of days, then return them to the ambient temperature. According to Cryo-Nebraska, by treating the instrument at sub-zero temperatures, inherent stresses within the structure of the metal called "residual stresses" are released. Interestingly enough, the rise in temperature from -300 to +75 degrees over a 24 hour period is a rate greater than 15 degrees per hour. Surely the instrument is playable once it's at room temperature.

And last but not least...

To answer the comment to be nice and not so rude in my reply:

I was being nice. What I said was "This statement is absolutely nonsense..." I didn't call you an idiot, I didn't say you were dumb, I didn't make fun of you in any way. I simply stated that it was nonsense, because frankly, it's absurd. I've played so many gigs in varying weather conditions with temerature shifts that FAR exceed the magnatude of the shift you mentioned. I play in the range of 100 shows in a slow year, and 1/4 of them are in the winter, and I mean EXTREMELY cold winter... You need to keep looking for the hidden variable because your cymbal sure didn't break due to a rapid shift of 15 degrees.

I Spent a bit of time looking for ANY evidence that supported your claim that this happens, and frankly, I cannot find any data that would indicate there is any truth at ALL to the matter, in fact, it looks to be a spurious relationship.

I'd be happy to see your data if you can gather some up, but I'd have to say that it's pretty unlikely that you'll find any from a reliable source.
 

drummerboi819

New member
zen_drummer":96ccyo08 said:
Deanoatc":96ccyo08 said:
Did you know that all you need is a rapid temperature change of 15 degrees to break a cymbal while playing?
This statement is absolutely nonsense...
Never had it happen..have had the same Zildjian cymbals for years, and never one cracked cymbal yet! Temperature can mess the kit up and cymbals if left out for a while for sure, but carrying it from the car/van/whatever the vehicle you use to the gig's stage won't have a drastic change in temperature on the cymbal. Brass is extremely durable, and your cymbals usually sit on the stage and in a room where it is climate controlled anyway.

I don't see where there would be problems..maybe it is the way you and your friends play? No disrespect..my friends also break cymbals, but it is more of technique rather than weather.
 
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