The Lightest Drumstick?

Irish

New member
I'm fairly new to drumming, so I hope you guys understand my situation. I feel I play better with light sticks rather than heavier ones, but I have no idea where to look. Many drum sticks have codes, but I have no idea what they mean. Can anyone help me out? I'm just looking for the lightest drumstick for rock-type playing.

Thanks guys
 

screamkevin

New member
Irish":3l8r6qk7 said:
I'm fairly new to drumming, so I hope you guys understand my situation. I feel I play better with light sticks rather than heavier ones, but I have no idea where to look. Many drum sticks have codes, but I have no idea what they mean. Can anyone help me out? I'm just looking for the lightest drumstick for rock-type playing.

Thanks guys
It depends on what brand you go with, really. I suggest heading over to Musician's Friend's website, and signing up for their catalog. You can look through that and see stick diameters and lengths there. You'll also be able to select what wood you want to use, most sticks are either maple, hickory, or oak.

Generally speaking, though, here's a quick primer. The smaller the number in the code, the larger the stick will be. (Kinda backwards, don't you think?) For example, the 2B is a large, fat rock stick, whereas the 7A is a lighter, thinner jazzy stick.

Most rock drummers that I've seen use either a 2B or a 5B. There are, of course, exceptions to that. I'm a rock drummer, and personally, I use a stick that is along the lines of a 5A, slightly thinner than a 5B, with a short taper and a round nylon ball tip. It's called the Pro-Mark TX707N.

I'd suggest getting a pair of 5B's and seeing how you feel about them. If they are too big for you, try 5A's. If that's still too big, maybe even try a 7A. Just remember that you can't really go thrashing around with thin sticks and expect them to last. Proper technique is a must, along with dynamics. And the best tip of all: If you are in a band situation, playing a mic'd drumkit, remember to let the mic's do the work. You don't have to bash the hell out of your drums for them to be loud. That's what the mic's, PA, and soundman are for.

Good luck!
 

Irish

New member
screamkevin":2afr9bac said:
Irish":2afr9bac said:
I'm fairly new to drumming, so I hope you guys understand my situation. I feel I play better with light sticks rather than heavier ones, but I have no idea where to look. Many drum sticks have codes, but I have no idea what they mean. Can anyone help me out? I'm just looking for the lightest drumstick for rock-type playing.

Thanks guys
It depends on what brand you go with, really. I suggest heading over to Musician's Friend's website, and signing up for their catalog. You can look through that and see stick diameters and lengths there. You'll also be able to select what wood you want to use, most sticks are either maple, hickory, or oak.

Generally speaking, though, here's a quick primer. The smaller the number in the code, the larger the stick will be. (Kinda backwards, don't you think?) For example, the 2B is a large, fat rock stick, whereas the 7A is a lighter, thinner jazzy stick.

Most rock drummers that I've seen use either a 2B or a 5B. There are, of course, exceptions to that. I'm a rock drummer, and personally, I use a stick that is along the lines of a 5A, slightly thinner than a 5B, with a short taper and a round nylon ball tip. It's called the Pro-Mark TX707N.

I'd suggest getting a pair of 5B's and seeing how you feel about them. If they are too big for you, try 5A's. If that's still too big, maybe even try a 7A. Just remember that you can't really go thrashing around with thin sticks and expect them to last. Proper technique is a must, along with dynamics. And the best tip of all: If you are in a band situation, playing a mic'd drumkit, remember to let the mic's do the work. You don't have to bash the hell out of your drums for them to be loud. That's what the mic's, PA, and soundman are for.

Good luck!
Thank you so much! I couldn't have asked for a better answer, I really appreciate it. I will take your advice and use it wisely.

Thanks again!
 

scrubs

New member
Maple is a lighter wood. I like the Vic Firth SD4 combo. Also check out the Vater Sugar Maple series.
 

Shalaq

New member
Also I would add that lighter sticks produce thinner sound on your set. Remember, if you have thick double ply heads on your drums with big heavy cymbals, you will have to hit really hard to get a decent sound with a lighter stick. If you want to use lighter sticks for rock I'd suggest going for maple sticks. You'll play a bigger stick but with lighter feel. Light as with a thin hickory stick, but more contact with cymbals and drums will produce a beefier sound.
 

anavrinIV

New member
also dont forget about oak sticks...if you like thinner sticks but feel that theyre too light and brittle then check out the promark oak sticks. i usae oak 5as and i really like the feel of them
 

drummert2k

New member
if you want light sticks for rock, dont go with 7a's unless you use really thin, fairly small crashes and single ply heads or esle you'll have to work way to hard to produce a sound. vic firth makes really nice feeling 5a's. i'd recommend them.
 

Irish

New member
Thanks everyone! I can't find a reply posted that isn't helpful in every way. I'm very glad I chose to come here for advice.

Thanks again!
 

Flatliner

New member
I use vic firth 8Ds for Rock, that's about as thin as you probably want to go for Rock and most poeple would probably say that's way to thin for rock.
 

Shalaq

New member
drummert2k":2ohog99n said:
if you want light sticks for rock, dont go with 7a's unless you use really thin, fairly small crashes and single ply heads or esle you'll have to work way to hard to produce a sound. vic firth makes really nice feeling 5a's. i'd recommend them.
I play blues/rock and use an ever thinner stick. But I have single ply heads to get a full sound without having to hit hard :)
 
Ok, well I fell that way too. Lighter the stick the faster the hihat note. But I strangly use heavier sticks. For some reason I just like them better. I too have no idea what the codes are but I just feel them and try them a little bit and judge them by that. I use Joey Jordison AHEAD sticks, they are kind of heavier but for some reason they just feel a lot better. And they reduce the recoil/vibrations in the sticks.
 

brian

New member
try out aheads! they are light. but if you like wood sticks then i would go with a 7A if you dont hit too hard.
 

ClintKelly

New member
id go with vic firth american hickory 7a, theyre light, but you may have to work harder if you use heaver cymbals and heads.
 
A lot of jazz guys play the 7A sticks, their really light.

I think for me it had to do with how big my grip was, I play in a metal band and play some fast rythms, I've actually tried some of the smaller 7A's due to the fact that a majority of the 5Bs where a little too heavy putting a lot of strain on my finger joints when playing fast rythms.. I ended up finding a stick that was perfect for my grip and for the speed of some of the rythms I was playing. If you get a chance, check out some Promark 5B naturals, they have a milled feel which tends to give you better grip and are made out of American Hickory.. Their definatley a pretty tough stick and have a thicker feel but are pretty light.

Later!
 

Howepirate

New member
Rock + light sticks is an oxymoron

That being said tho

The Vic Firth carmine appice sigs are some of the best sticks ive had
they have a light feel but a beefy enough stick to be able to maneuver in your hand and not have a lot of slippage and whatnot great for finger technique

so try em u like em they work for all styles of music!
 

TheYardstick

New member
I use Vic Firth American Classic 5B's and love them. I ripped through my first pair in one month, but that was from playing like a wild man, I have been using the same pair recently for over 2 months, and they are still standing strong even after heavy daily practices.
 

Brazilian Drummer

New member
here is my 2 cents on light or heave sticks....

after many years of marchign band and drumcorps and playing with big ass sticks here is what I have found out.

no matter what size stick I play with I always try to use the heaviest pair I can find. ex.

if I'm using 5Bs I play with 4 pairs and get the heaviest ones I also try to listen to the tone of the wood. the higher teh pitch the heavier the stick, the better it will maje your drums sound AND they will last you longer them others.

the heavier pair will produce more sound with less effort. and will have a better fill, with more responce.

you can realy notice this on higher pitched drums. 2 diferent 5Bs one high and one low pitch will sound verry diferent on a snare drum and feel diferent to.

I cant play with 2 sticks that feel diferent or feel holow that just bug the hell out of me. so whem I but sticks I always listen to the sticks I'm buying.
I put the tip of the stick in my ear and tap it were I would hold it (try it) them put a different stick.

now a days the stick come pratty well matched to one another in a box but diferent pairs will sound diferent from one another.
 
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