Taste.

Alcyon

New member
I went to Long and McQuade the other day to buy some crash cymbals, because all I have now is ZXTs which suck because they aren't loud enough. I ended up buying a Sabian AA Medium Crash, but i'm considering returning it.

I didn't like ANY of the cymbals there. None of them seemed to reply fast enough or trashy enough. When I do a fill I want to go like, do ba do ba do PISH!!! But all of the cymbals I heard (and I pissed the hell off of the staff by playing a crapload of cymbals) sounded more like DIINNNNGGG.

Now one example of the cymbal sound I love is in Nirvana's In Bloom, where Dave Grohl does that fill, "do, do bap a do, bap bap a da ba da ba" twice and then does a crash hit. So I looked up the cymbals he played back then and they were all relatively big, like 18" and 20" even for crashes. Listening to them in the store and to that AA Medium at home, they still sounded wrong to me.

Am I just being picky or do I have bad taste? Because good drummers have told me what I should like and I respect them...
 

Rockaflodge

New member
Dude you got to remember that on a cd, there is so much studio work done, the cymbal sound is eq, then sometims they add some high or add some lows throuh the mix when they master the cd. I play zildjian Z customs, 16,18,19 and 20in crashs and they are loud and have a good crash sound to me, or you could try the sabian AAX's , I used to use them and they were loud and had a good crash sound too.
 

The Heel

New member
Besides, when you're playing with a band, the ringing of a crash cymbal is eaten up by the sounds of the rest of the band.

For quick crashes... try the A Custom series yet?
 

Shalaq

New member
Remember, this crash sound is with a band and after the mix etc etc. Although the cymbal might feel wrong when played on your kit only, it can sound great when played with a band.
 

zen_drummer

New member
Shalaq":1li023ke said:
Remember, this crash sound is with a band and after the mix etc etc. Although the cymbal might feel wrong when played on your kit only, it can sound great when played with a band.
A common problem, especially with players that are new at this, is the failure to realize that drums and cymbals sound different ten-20 feet from the instrument than they do out in front of the band, in the mix.

Somewhere else on this forum I had pasted in a video clip of the drummer from the house band for the Rockstar INXS and Supernova series, and it was a close up demo of his gear. It sounds pretty awful to most people that are expecting a "finished" sound. In the band, the stuff sounds entirely different. Check it out under the topic on damping toms (under the drumset category)

The very best thing you can do is to get another good player to play your drums and then go out front and listen. You'll see what your kit sounds like.
 

scrubs

New member
Also be aware that cymbals that work great in a live environment may not be ideal for recording and vice versa. Smaller, thinner, faster sounding cymbals may give you the "pish" that you're looking for, but would get totally lost behind a band. Whereas, larger cymbals, as previously stated, may seem to ring longer from your perspective, but once you add in the rest of the band/mix, that ringing is not really noticeable.
 

The Heel

New member
I swear its like my posts are invisible.

The Heel "Besides, when you're playing with a band, the ringing of a crash cymbal is eaten up by the sounds of the rest of the band. "

Next post:

Shalaq "Remember, this crash sound is with a band and after the mix etc etc. Although the cymbal might feel wrong when played on your kit only, it can sound great when played with a band."

Maybe they are.
 

zen_drummer

New member
I swear its like my posts are invisible.
Heel, do you think that once you post a comment nobody else should be allowed to say the same thing in their post?

When many people voice the same or similar opinions we're creating a consensus.
 

Alcyon

New member
You know when you post a comment you should let other people say the same thing in their posts.

We create a consensus when many people voice the same or similar opinions.

:p
 

The Heel

New member
My bad. Its just weird to see someone post the same thing as you, and then see other guys quote the second thing and say "YEAH! Thank GOD he said that!"

Consensus seen.

My bad.
 

Shalaq

New member
Maybe I was quoted because I was the last to post. If it were another way round than I'm sure you would be quoted. Don't worry, your posts are read and thought about I assure you :)
 

Alcyon

New member
Aaaaaaanyway...

What should I do in terms of buying? Should I just buy based on what is recommended rather than what I think sounds good? Because I think I have the wrong opinion, haha. As someone said, the kind of cymbal sound I like would probably be drowned out playing live.
 

The Heel

New member
Alcyon":hlz80zub said:
Aaaaaaanyway...

What should I do in terms of buying? Should I just buy based on what is recommended rather than what I think sounds good? Because I think I have the wrong opinion, haha. As someone said, the kind of cymbal sound I like would probably be drowned out playing live.
You forgot to quote Shalaq. heh. Kidding. Kidding.

Buy a cymbal that has the characteristics in it that you like. Cymbals are major investments that will be a real part of your sound for years. Dont be afraid to take a long time choosing one. I do think you should at least check out the A Custom series before buying a Sabian just because you've grown to like Sabian though.

And just because you tried one 18" AAX does NOT at all mean that every 18" AAX will sound like it.

Every cymbal made has its own unique sound. Just take your time, pick something your happy with, and make the right choice.

Also I dont know if at your drum shop you can put it on a kit and play with it in a drumming situation... but thats a great way to test cymbals out as well.
 

Johnny Cat

New member
Also keep in mind, (and if someone already mentioned this, than I am just adding to the consensus :D), that room acoustics effect the sound of the cymbal as well. May sound great in the store, take it home and you have different reflections coming back at you.

Plus, there's the fact that your ears are more sensitive to mid range at lower volume (that's why telephones are midrange, to match the human voice) but as things get louder, highs and lows become more prevalent. What sounds higher pitched OR more full to you at one volume, may sound clangy at a different volume, or more "pingy". Try different weights.
 

Parrenze

New member
Have a good go on zildjians cymbal configator. I swear I must have been through every possible cymbal on there now...
 
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