taped skins

Daza73

New member
wots the go with putting tape on your skins???
ive seen drummers do it but never really understood y...
what does it do?
 

anavrinIV

New member
its a way for people without any ability to tune to make their drums sound half decent by taking away the overtones but also killing tone and resonanace...they swear it sounds good but thats because theyre usually comparing the sound to the one full of overtones, forgetting that their drums now have no resonanace or projection.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
Yup. what he said.

A small piece of gaff tape folded in the middle, or "flagged" isn't bad sometimes, but usually only when the sound engineer is a novice.

But people who cover their heads with duct tape are silly. Learn to tune or buy new heads, if that's the problem. I saw a guy once who had several half-inch deep dents in his snare head and a 10" piece of duct tape flagged across the batter head. Just get a new head!
 

drummert2k

New member
agree with all of the above. muffled up drums may sound decent to them when they're right on top of them but step back a few steps or add the drums into the mix. they just sound like wet cardboard.
 

break the prism

New member
yeah i see a lot of drummers (especially beginners) draping their skins in duct tape. god, it sounds awful. this one kid i saw had a decent idea though. he had pieces of foam rubber attached to his tom heads (by one piece of tape each) it sounded like he was using moongels.
never use a bunch of duct tape though. it kills the tone even after you decide to take it off your drumhead.
 

Howepirate

New member
The only time i ever do it is for snare cuz well a very small very loud steel piccolo snare drum can have a very big and not subtle ring so a bit of tape clears it up BUT ONLY A LITTLE~!


Never tape your toms



YUCK


I dont care if the heads are stock!



No tape!
 

FelterSkelter

New member
anavrinIV":27lo6k2k said:
its a way for people without any ability to tune to make their drums sound half decent by taking away the overtones but also killing tone and resonanace...they swear it sounds good but thats because theyre usually comparing the sound to the one full of overtones, forgetting that their drums now have no resonanace or projection.
I've tried to research this a bit to no avail, so maybe you can tell me what a "good sound" is. Oh, that's right, it's subjective!
This is a tried and true way to muffle drums. It has been done by the beginner as well as the seasoned pro, and also by people who DO have the ability to tune.
Sometimes when you play different venues you need to pull out some tricks to make the gear work the way you need it to. This is necessary and doesn't make you stupid or unknowledgeable.

I think the argument is that if you had the right heads you wouldn't need to muffle ever and all your problems would be solved. Nobody would get mad at you for taping your skins and call you a dummy.
 

anavrinIV

New member
FelterSkelter":1meyet2q said:
anavrinIV":1meyet2q said:
its a way for people without any ability to tune to make their drums sound half decent by taking away the overtones but also killing tone and resonanace...they swear it sounds good but thats because theyre usually comparing the sound to the one full of overtones, forgetting that their drums now have no resonanace or projection.
I've tried to research this a bit to no avail, so maybe you can tell me what a "good sound" is. Oh, that's right, it's subjective!
This is a tried and true way to muffle drums. It has been done by the beginner as well as the seasoned pro, and also by people who DO have the ability to tune.
Sometimes when you play different venues you need to pull out some tricks to make the gear work the way you need it to. This is necessary and doesn't make you stupid or unknowledgeable.

I think the argument is that if you had the right heads you wouldn't need to muffle ever and all your problems would be solved. Nobody would get mad at you for taping your skins and call you a dummy.
maybe i should clear up my idea a little...

whenever i see someone with tape, moongel, foam, towels, whatever plastered within and throughout their set i suggest that they reevaluate their tuning and try taking off all the crap that muffles the drum. the response is always "i love the sound im getting, its a deep thud with no resonance and thats what i love". they think that a dead thump sounds good, and it might when right next to the set, but good or not doesnt matter when they cant be heard at all. ive had to play gigs in small places where the drums were not miced and there were various sets depending on who was hosting. i played a set that was muffled like crazy (2 moongels and lots of tape on detuned pinstripes on the toms, stuffed bass) and when i watched the video later i could hear nothing but snare and cymbals on tracks that were accented with the bass and toms often. i played the same venue on an unmuffled set and i could hear everything fine.

you can put as much of whatever on your set as you want. i dont care who tapes what, i dont like it. on small piece is fine, but when heads are loaded with tape i dont think that the drum can have characteristics to truly call it a drum.
 

christopherabruce

New member
I agree. Even with the "right" heads and well-honed tuning skills, a bit of tape is needed, at times, on drums and cymbals. Some rooms, or bad engineers, just require more control that gaffers tape can provide.

Christopher

FelterSkelter":1d7eoa3l said:
anavrinIV":1d7eoa3l said:
its a way for people without any ability to tune to make their drums sound half decent by taking away the overtones but also killing tone and resonanace...they swear it sounds good but thats because theyre usually comparing the sound to the one full of overtones, forgetting that their drums now have no resonanace or projection.
I've tried to research this a bit to no avail, so maybe you can tell me what a "good sound" is. Oh, that's right, it's subjective!
This is a tried and true way to muffle drums. It has been done by the beginner as well as the seasoned pro, and also by people who DO have the ability to tune.
Sometimes when you play different venues you need to pull out some tricks to make the gear work the way you need it to. This is necessary and doesn't make you stupid or unknowledgeable.

I think the argument is that if you had the right heads you wouldn't need to muffle ever and all your problems would be solved. Nobody would get mad at you for taping your skins and call you a dummy.
 

break the prism

New member
i think that there are less harmful and more efficient ways of muffling toms or getting rid of overtones (zero rings, moongel, muff'ls)
i make sure that my toms are tuned before i muffle them, so they still have tone. it's just like playing a trumpet with a mute.
 

Call me Gideon

New member
I used to buy the self adhesive weather stripping and put a small ring of it in the center of my tom heads, on the inside. I won't lie though...as a younger drummer I used to tape napkins inside my snare head too. I dont have to use dampening so much now that I've got a bit more experiance.
 

Kaos

New member
If I muffle I use moon gels only as tape leaves residue I spent too much money on my heads just to screw them up with sticky shit. When I was younger I found a cool way to muffle drums with out tape I used to drop cotton balls down in my toms and snare to help muffle overtones and they worked really well then I was taught how to tune I do use a moongel on my snares usually at practice cuz the room really sucks but in the studio and live I use no muffling I just hate it.
 

youknowitssick

New member
everyone has their own opinion on what a good drum sound is.
i put a few small pieces of gaff tape no the batter side of all my toms, and i love it.
 

galgano16

New member
never tape the toms, if u do, its gonna look like the retard took a knife and stabbed holes through the skins, then tried 2 fix them with duct tape,
 
*Shudders at the thought of taping drumheads*
I did that when I first started playing. Then bought the O rings, and then I learned how to tune, and live with that overtone/sustain that a drum produces.
Last time I recorded, I used a 2 inch piece of tape to kill some of the ring because there was too much ring and pang coming out on the recording. The tape helped, didnt dampen the sound, still had body but evened it out. I like my top head nice and tight, and the snares at medium tension, not too loose, not too tight. That way I get a nice crack with some body and depth. But that day I recorded, wierd. Maybe the head was out of wack, it was hot in there that day.
 

Lorneyc

New member
I've used tape from time to time on heads that were totally worn out untill I could afford new ones. Drum heads are expensive, I just can't afford to change them as often as I should. Once they get past a certain point, it's pretty damn hard to get a decent sound and sometimes a bit of tape will help. Ideally though, I go for decent heads and the only things that touch them are the shell of the drum, the hoop and my sticks!
 
I don't think it is good or bad it's just a way of getting differnent tones. Like this time I read that Ringo used to put dish towles on his drums to get his sound on some of the beatles recordings. My drummer and I tried it out for shit and grins and sure enough it was right in the ballpark. Could we have gotten there by tuning or different heads I don't know. I say do what every makes you happy.
 

skitch

New member
If the producer or song call for me to muffle, I will do it! THe tape though is a different story.

Some drumers do it to make their drummers look cool (to them). Some drummers use it to muffle their drums down and some do it for both reasons. I don't ever use duct tapel I use Gaffers tape, if needed.
 

Conor

New member
it gets rid of some of the overtones, you still have to be good at tuning though. if you use a lot of tape you get really little resonance, which might be ok for recording or playing with miced toms
 
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