Steve Gadd playing NOBLE and COOLEY?????

zen_drummer

New member
I went to see a rehearsal tonight for a show that's happening tomorrow night with Steve Gadd on the Drums and Tony Levin playing the bass. (living in Gadd's home town has certain benefits) It was really great to see both players in such an intimate setting, but it sure was strange to see the Yamaha Poster Child playing a set of Noble and Cooley's!

Gadd was sight-reading the charts and the playing was flawless... Everything was perfect on the first pass through. The drums sounded incredible.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
I think Tony Levin's from my neck of the woods. Never met him though. You are lucky, that's a crazy combo of musicians to see.
 

mortem

New member
zen_drummer":14mlvyg6 said:
I went to see a rehearsal tonight for a show that's happening tomorrow night with Steve Gadd on the Drums and Tony Levin playing the bass. (living in Gadd's home town has certain benefits) It was really great to see both players in such an intimate setting, but it sure was strange to see the Yamaha Poster Child playing a set of Noble and Cooley's!

Gadd was sight-reading the charts and the playing was flawless... Everything was perfect on the first pass through. The drums sounded incredible.
You, sir, are a lucky man.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
Why was he playing Noble & Cooleys? Is he ending his relationship with Yamaha? Or was it just a convenience thing for him? (My kit's being set up at the venue tonight while I rehearse here, etc.) I would like to see N&C get some more high profile endorsers. I had heard a rumor that they were going out of business. I hope not.
 
I think that's awesome, it's a tribute to Noble & Cooleys craftsmanship, I just recently bought an SS snare drum and it's the all time best drum I've played, bar none! I can see why Gadd would want to play them.
 

screamkevin

New member
In all likelihood, the N&C kit was provided by cartage. There's no way that Steve would be leaving Yamaha, especially since Yamaha has released their Gadd 30th Anniversary Kit commemorating his time with them.
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Chances are the cartage (rental) company only had a set of N&C available as their "high-end" kit.

I highly doubt Gadd is jumping ship from Yamaha. And he probably welcomed the temporary change in drum environments!

~B
 

Gaddabout

New member
I think screaminkevin is right, there's no way Gadd is leaving Yomamaha. He's a lifer. His name and image are all over the product, and I'm sure they treat him like royalty.

However, some strange things going on at Yammie the last 10 years or so ...

Vinnie Colaiuta was secretly playing Gretsch in the studio (maybe for a few years?) while playing his Yammies in public. When he finally switched to Gretsch, it was like the Earth cracking open and Armageddon to the drum community ... one of the "big 3" finally left Yammie.

Other artists sort of meandered away and discovered the newcomers like DW, which no one saw coming. People always assumed the Japanese drums would dominate like they did in the 80s when they buried Ludwig, Rogers, and Slingerland. No one saw that one coming either.

The latest crash you heard was the sound of Peter Erskine -- PETER FREAKIN' ERSKINE -- leaving Yammie for ... DW. Erskine, the modern master of sweet jazz, endorsing an American manufacturer known for big rock sounds? It's true, and Erskine sheepishly confessed to it on another board. Not sheepishly really ... the guy's a major class act, he just felt bad the news got out before he had a chance to firm up exactly what he's going to be endorsing for DW. He also maintains a friendship with the Yammie guys, so he's not looking to burn anyone on this switch.

Still ... there's Gadd and Weckl on the Yammies, and those two probably sell more kits with their endorsements than any other five drummers you can put together. I can't imagine either of those two leaving their flagship endorsement, although it was equally stunning when Weckl left Zildjian for Sabian. That was a good deal for all the drumming community because his line of Sabians are amazing.

Anyway ... I think it was just a matter of what cartage had available. I know Dennis Chambers has played other kits when he's not in a town where they keep Pearl in stock. If it's an impromptu gig and there's no Pearl rep or Pearl distributor close by, you take what you can get.

FWIW, it's even more common for drummers to use multiple kits in the studio. I know of one drummer who is a big-time endorser for a certain brand of drums, but he only uses his custom kit with wood hoops in the studio.

Furthermore, endorsements are sketchy deals. What does it entail? It's complicated. Vinnie has an entire signature line of drums with Gretsch that includes a very nice 10-ply maple snare, but Vinnie never uses it. He uses his Hitmaker or his Longo or one of his other dreamy, unobtainable-to-people-like-me snare drums.
 

zen_drummer

New member
PerKuhShunIst":1i8farcv said:
Did get to see what series snare he was using?
Was Tony playing the stick at all?
I ended up going to see the show that they were rehearsing for. The crowd was like a who's who of drummers and bass players of western New York.

Gadd was warm and cordial, posing for a photo with my son, he's a drummer as well, 18 years old. Gadd asked My son what his name was, and my son sheepishly responded "Tyler". Gadd asked if he was a drummer as well and Tyler answered yes. Steve then told me that John Beck, our old teacher from back in the 60's and 70's was going to be at the show as well. Sure enough, John Beck was there, in the audience watching his most famous student. He was very proud.

At the end of the night, hours later, my son had raided the trunk of my car and took a spare drum head out to have it signed by Gadd. Gadd saw him there, patiently waiting to hand him the drum head, and he took the head, said to my son... "It's Tyler... right?" And he put on the head, "to Tyler... Best Wishes, Steve Gadd". It's amazing that as huge as this player is, he's the real deal. I'm sure he remembers the days when his dad took HIM to shows and exposed him to the greats of the time. What a wonderful experience for both my son and my self.

To answer some of the questions, The Noble and Cooley kit was not his own, it was supplied by the band for the performance. He was playing what looked like a brass Yamaha Snare drum. The music at the show was all written by Joe Brucato, a local player and song writer. The only exception was two additional songs that were a treat for the audience. They performed "50 ways to leave your lover" and "Salsbury Hill".

Tony Levin played 5 string bass and the Stick. On Salsbury Hill he put on the stick and layed down the MOST freakish bass line I have ever heard. It was insane.

The last song of the night featured Gadd with a short solo section. He played parts that are actually impossible for a human being to play. Seriously. All through the night his playing was solid, appropriate and perfect... playing to the songwriters music. On his solo, he played over the bar lines, insanely complex patterns that were so musical it defies description, and nobody... and I mean nobody, could ever begin to replicate the combination of rhythms and feel that he layed down for that period of time.

When it's all said and done, I spent last night standing no more than 12 feet from one of the best drummers that ever lived while he perfectly crafted a tapestry of groove that can only be desribed as undeniably flawless.

He and I had not one, but TWO of the same teachers in our lives. I'm standing on the side lines in awe. His parents got more for their money than I did!

Somebody on this thread said I was really lucky. You have NO idea how right you are.
 

PerKuhShunIst

New member
zen_drummer":1045mp07 said:
PerKuhShunIst":1045mp07 said:
Did get to see what series snare he was using?
Was Tony playing the stick at all?
I ended up going to see the show that they were rehearsing for. The crowd was like a who's who of drummers and bass players of western New York.

Gadd was warm and cordial, posing for a photo with my son, he's a drummer as well, 18 years old. Gadd asked My son what his name was, and my son sheepishly responded "Tyler". Gadd asked if he was a drummer as well and Tyler answered yes. Steve then told me that John Beck, our old teacher from back in the 60's and 70's was going to be at the show as well. Sure enough, John Beck was there, in the audience watching his most famous student. He was very proud.

At the end of the night, hours later, my son had raided the trunk of my car and took a spare drum head out to have it signed by Gadd. Gadd saw him there, patiently waiting to hand him the drum head, and he took the head, said to my son... "It's Tyler... right?" And he put on the head, "to Tyler... Best Wishes, Steve Gadd". It's amazing that as huge as this player is, he's the real deal. I'm sure he remembers the days when his dad took HIM to shows and exposed him to the greats of the time. What a wonderful experience for both my son and my self.

To answer some of the questions, The Noble and Cooley kit was not his own, it was supplied by the band for the performance. He was playing what looked like a brass Yamaha Snare drum. The music at the show was all written by Joe Brucato, a local player and song writer. The only exception was two additional songs that were a treat for the audience. They performed "50 ways to leave your lover" and "Salsbury Hill".

Tony Levin played 5 string bass and the Stick. On Salsbury Hill he put on the stick and layed down the MOST freakish bass line I have ever heard. It was insane.

The last song of the night featured Gadd with a short solo section. He played parts that are actually impossible for a human being to play. Seriously. All through the night his playing was solid, appropriate and perfect... playing to the songwriters music. On his solo, he played over the bar lines, insanely complex patterns that were so musical it defies description, and nobody... and I mean nobody, could ever begin to replicate the combination of rhythms and feel that he layed down for that period of time.

When it's all said and done, I spent last night standing no more than 12 feet from one of the best drummers that ever lived while he perfectly crafted a tapestry of groove that can only be desribed as undeniably flawless.

He and I had not one, but TWO of the same teachers in our lives. I'm standing on the side lines in awe. His parents got more for their money than I did!

Somebody on this thread said I was really lucky. You have NO idea how right you are.

Great story, thanks for sharing that!
I've yet to see Tony or Steve in person.
They way you described Tony's Stick lines as well as Steve's chops is just about the way I remember thinking of each when seeing them on DVD's.

Again thanks for sharing that experience!
 

Gaddabout

New member
That was a great story, Zen, and as someone who bears the man's namesake in his moniker, I greatly appreciate you taking the time to tell it.
 

earldrum

New member
Hi Gaddabout:

You said:
Gaddabout":15so2hj3 said:
I can't imagine either of those two leaving their flagship endorsement, although it was equally stunning when Weckl left Zildjian for Sabian. That was a good deal for all the drumming community because his line of Sabians are amazing.
I don't know if many of you know this, but Dave Weckl was an early Sabian endorser (i.e. around 1983-84) this was before his Zildjian days. Dave used Sabian cymbals on his first (maybe only) Paul Simon tour.

I know it is not uncommon for a endorsed drummer to have to use whatever drums "the venue" provides for certain gigs. This can be for many reasons like: it can be hassle carrying your own drums to smaller gigs or if on tour, the band gets equipment provided at certain venues because it is cheaper than flying out their regular gear. I actually let Tony Morales of the Rippingtons use my Gretsch drums at a gig at the Club Bene in Perth Amboy, NJ in 1995. He asked me to use them because the club kit was an old 24" bass drum Slingerland kit with huge toms that sounded horrible.

I also have one other interesting endorser story using other equipment. Dennis Chambers is playing a Spaun "coke bottle" colored acrylic snare drum during a Santana soundcheck. The photo I saw was on the cover of a new drum magazine called "DRUMHEAD" (i.e., the lastest issue). That must of made Pearl Drums really happy (i.e., Buddy Rich playing a Fibes SST fiberglass snare drum made Slingerland realy happy in the 1970's. You know Buddy told Slingerland something like this: "if your snare drum sounded this good, I would be playing it!"
 
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