Splash Warning

SHOGUNWARRIOR32

New member
I see a lot of drummers put a splash cymbal up side down on top of their crash.. i did this for about a month with my fairly new AAX 8"....when i took it off to pack it up for a gig today, i noticed about 5 cracks in the center hole...PISSED!!!.. I have the hard plastic rod/thread covers on my stands, so it wasn't the threads doin it. Also..i know it wasn't like that before i tried this because i have a habit of totally inspecting my cymbals when i tear down and set up.

Anyone ever have this happen?




Shogun
 

dave lynch

New member
I just started doing that so nothing yet..I'll have to think twice about it now...Crap I was liking it too..hehe !!
 

Brother_Bong

New member
Yes I have, destroyed the cymbal entirely. We know how we are not supposed to hit the cymbal square on the edge (when it's set up properly), by placing it upside down, we are exagerating this effect. The vibrations are carried wrong, thats why the cracks formed where they did.
 

screamkevin

New member
I used to do that. One thing to remember, which I'm sure that you did, is to maybe consider placing a small, thin felt between the two cymbals so you don't have metal-to-metal contact. That may have contributed.
 

m

New member
was it metal-on-metal contact, or did you have a felt between them?

I've never mounted a splash upside-down because I figured with their typically thin profile it might be dangerous.
I have mounted bells in that fashion, but they're so thick I've never had any problems. I always put a felt between them though.
 

SHOGUNWARRIOR32

New member
m":ta9sgsrs said:
was it metal-on-metal contact, or did you have a felt between them?

I've never mounted a splash upside-down because I figured with their typically thin profile it might be dangerous.
I have mounted bells in that fashion, but they're so thick I've never had any problems. I always put a felt between them though.
I definitely had a felt between them.
I figured it may haver been this.. by the way the cymbal is shaped, when it's on the stand right side up, it naturally balances level on the stand by the way it's shaped..but upside down, it's gonna naturally tilt to whatever angle the crash is tilted, adding additional pressure to the inside of the hole..so when hitting it, there's no tolerance and it immediately pushes on the inside of the hole..and as the cymbal spins during playing..thus causing the various cracks.

Just wanted to throw this out there to whoever thought about doin this.
 

stump

New member
I've never seen any sense in setting cmybals up that way. Keep in mind that they are not designed to be struck in that position. In my opinion it's just a flashy way to make your set different and not a performance issue. Peace on ya!
 

SHOGUNWARRIOR32

New member
stump":3psdr9bi said:
I've never seen any sense in setting cybals up that way. Keep in mind that they are not designed to be struck in that position. In my opinion it's just a flashy way to make your set different and not a performance issue. Peace on ya!
Well.. it did save on space..and it actually does give a slightly different sound..kind of a "cup" sound...if that makes any sense...which sets it a little apart from my other 2 splashes.. ... but i will never set it up like that again.


Shogun
 

Squid

New member
Why do people set them up this way?

Do you hit the splash or is it used for generating a different sound when you hit the crash?

Please don't riddicule me if the answer is obvious.....im only just starting out!
 

Atmerrill

New member
Bong":1tsu4rr8 said:
Yes I have, destroyed the cymbal entirely. We know how we are not supposed to hit the cymbal square on the edge (when it's set up properly), by placing it upside down, we are exagerating this effect. The vibrations are carried wrong, thats why the cracks formed where they did.
Hey Shogun and Bong: Yeah, it's a bear when you find things out the hard way and ruin a really good cymbal.

Years ago, I watched Les De Merle do this cymbal bending thing (you'd cup the crash cymbal between your left hand and left armpit, and bend the cymbal while you're playing it with the right hand). Was kind of a cool visual - esp. late night in the bar, but I ruined a really nice 16" thin crash when I was a little too amped on coffee. Anyway, that ended the cymbal bending shtick. Sometimes, ya just gotta learn yourself.
 

dannycareyisgod

New member
I'm just going to have to go with putting felt in between them, and learn where to hit the splash so that doesn't happen again. Sorry about that dude, that really does suck.
 

Squid

New member
Why do people set them up this way?

Do you hit the splash or is it used for generating a different sound when you hit the crash?

Please don't riddicule me if the answer is obvious.....im only just starting out!
 

Brother_Bong

New member
Squid":107zzadj said:
Why do people set them up this way?

Do you hit the splash or is it used for generating a different sound when you hit the crash?

Please don't riddicule me if the answer is obvious.....im only just starting out!
Its kind of a visual thing, and it saves space (eliminates a stand), and yes the splash is played, unless it was touching the crash it would not resonate it.
 

PDP9000

New member
stump":2ezayo08 said:
I've never seen any sense in setting cmybals up that way. Keep in mind that they are not designed to be struck in that position. In my opinion it's just a flashy way to make your set different and not a performance issue. Peace on ya!
ya me to i have never seen that many drummers set up thee splash cymbals like that.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
I put a 12" china on top of a large crash (with a felt between of course) of instead of inverting a splash. Chinas are made to be mounted "upside down" anyhow.
 

invision

New member
i had a 12" cracked splash and cut it to 8" and mounted it upside down on my 16" crash, after a day of playing it shaped into a china and gives this odd nifty sound, sort of industrial.
 

DRUMSMYWIFE

New member
Are you using proper felts and sleeves?. Make sure when you hit the splash cymbal, it doesn't move or swing that much and at the same time it also doesn't become stiff.
 
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