Sound Proofing a garage???

grey_fox

New member
hey, my kit is arriving on monday and i am trying to find out a cheap and effective way of dampening the sound exiting the garage, now my biggest problem is going tobe the up and over metel garage door so i need help with that and also the rest,

The garage is detached from the main house itself and its not really sealed airtight which may also cause problems with the kit as cold air and moisture will be entering, there are no windows the only entry point is the front metal door.

i found a couple of rolls of old thin carpet i have also procured some egg boxes but i don't know anywhere that would have lots of those

any help is greatly appreciated!

Thanks
James
 

scrubs

New member
Unfortunately, the products you describe (carpet/egg cartons) do virtually nothing to stop sound from escaping, especially the frequencies produced by a drumkit. Low frequencies have a lot of energy and pass through just about anything (like those bass heavy car stereos that you can hear coming blocks away - think an extra layer of carpet inside the car is going to do much? not likely). The only effective way to stop sound transmission is to build a sealed room inside of a room that is decoupled from the surrounding structure. Needless to say, that is a very expensive and complex project. Heavy duty insulation (4-8" thick of mineral wool/rockwool or condensed fiberglass) covering as many surfaces as possible will reduce, but not eliminate sound transmission.

Check the following resources for more info:
http://www.johnlsayers.com/phpBB2/index ... 71c67f7566
http://www.musicplayer.com/cgi-bin/ulti ... aysPrune=0
http://www.ethanwiner.com/acoustics.html
 

grey_fox

New member
Thanks for the links they are really quite helpfull!

Just so you know i am complete rookie with sound insulation and where to put what and where!

just browsing and looking at stuff like bass traps floating the floor and all that is confusing! this is gonna take a night up but i have to revise for an exam tomorrow aswell

also i should say that i will have very little money as my kit is costing me £1100 and i am paying it off monthly with a 500 deposit so untill i get a better paid job it is going to be hard!
 
I currently run a home studio and this has been an issue for me before. Especially with the louder rock acts. The best way to kill sound is to not only get the drums off the floor and onto a riser but to use air space to kill sound. Like the post before said you want to isolate frequencies from making surface contact with external walls. Sound travels better through solid material than open air. First off get your drums a minimum of 10 inches off the floor. This can be done very cheaply with eight milk crates and two sheets of four by six plywood. just lay out the crates in a grid pattern and lay the plywood on top. To isolate sound from the walls you can use blankets or moving pads hung in two layers with a minimum of six inches of air space between them. This creates a natural air sound damper and kills a lot of low frequency transfer. There are better methods but they can be quite costly. This method is how I started insulating my studio ten years ago and I still use it when I'm in a pinch. The whole thing should only run you at most $150.00. If you have a good second hand store in the area it will be considerably less. I've found that a combination of moving pads and navy blankets are the best for sound damping. Good Luck and rock on.
 

RogersDrummer

New member
I suggest using Styrofoam, carpeting, and drywall. My garage is mainly made up of cement, which is the best material for sound proofing a room, but the door and ceiling are made of really thin wood. If you cut and glue on all three of the aformentioned products, they cut the sound down by at least half. All three can be found at home depot, and are very inexpensive. All the "sound proofing" materials you see in music stores are bassically a complete waste of money.

On the garage door, i have 2 inch thick styrofoam, a layer of drywall over that, and carpet. It works quite well. From outside, its no louder then someone talking. Usually there is a pretty decent gap between the door and the wall. You can fill that in by adding strips of carpeting to the side of the door and the wall.
 

grey_fox

New member
KevinThrottlerod":2nfl8i3a said:
I currently run a home studio and this has been an issue for me before. Especially with the louder rock acts. The best way to kill sound is to not only get the drums off the floor and onto a riser but to use air space to kill sound. Like the post before said you want to isolate frequencies from making surface contact with external walls. Sound travels better through solid material than open air. First off get your drums a minimum of 10 inches off the floor. This can be done very cheaply with eight milk crates and two sheets of four by six plywood. just lay out the crates in a grid pattern and lay the plywood on top. To isolate sound from the walls you can use blankets or moving pads hung in two layers with a minimum of six inches of air space between them. This creates a natural air sound damper and kills a lot of low frequency transfer. There are better methods but they can be quite costly. This method is how I started insulating my studio ten years ago and I still use it when I'm in a pinch. The whole thing should only run you at most $150.00. If you have a good second hand store in the area it will be considerably less. I've found that a combination of moving pads and navy blankets are the best for sound damping. Good Luck and rock on.
Thanks that's awesome i shall get on i with getting the materials dunno where i will get milk crates in England but there might be a milk depot near me!
 

gumby

New member
Well i build music studios for a living....depending on your budget you can do a few things...i have a few ideas for you...but i need to know how much you a willing to spend..Check out our site http://acousticalfabricsolutions.com/
the key to "sound proofing" is layers.
i also notice one guy said your kick would be a problem...not so..
put "Bass Traps" in the corners of the room..that will help out alot..
hit me up at
www.myspace.com/sin_for_me
ill be more than willing to help ya out
till then later
 

gumby

New member
we also have a list of clients up...go look at what we've done to their rooms...and maybe youll get some ideas from them
 

scrubs

New member
gumby":3k2t3br5 said:
Well i build music studios for a living....depending on your budget you can do a few things...i have a few ideas for you...but i need to know how much you a willing to spend..Check out our site http://acousticalfabricsolutions.com/
the key to "sound proofing" is layers.
i also notice one guy said your kick would be a problem...not so..
put "Bass Traps" in the corners of the room..that will help out alot..
hit me up at
www.myspace.com/sin_for_me
ill be more than willing to help ya out
till then later
Bass traps in the corners will do just about nothing to stop sound from escaping the room. Bass traps are to control the buildup of bass frequencies within the room. If you believe bass traps have any role in "soundproofing," i pity those for whom you build studios.
 

PaulZILLA

New member
well. all of these are quite useful and some of them rather unique lol. myself i have problems with that at our rehersal space. it also is a garage. a rather cheaply built one.
we found that those egg-crate style foam matress things you can buy at most bed stores/walmart type things work decent to cover dry wall and things. as far ast he over and up garage door, that takes some finess. the hard part about that is covering it with things that will not restrict the door. we have adapted some picture hangers and hanging wire to do this. we placed a picture hanger with an eyelet cut into it on the doors existing brackets. and pushed another hanger through the foam padding and then used push pins to hold them together. if you cant do this. you can get a couple of the hangers and push them through the top and bottom of the foam and then use the picture wire through the eyelest and hang it over the door itself once inside. note. it may take a few layers of this foam to really get the job done. but it will help and isnt expensive. as far as sealing the garage up to not damage the kit. another easy fix. at hardware stores they have stuff for chalk lines. its a colord chalk powder. pour some of it in areas you think let air in. and sit in ther on a windy day and watch to see if it moves the dust any. doesnt take much dust. and then use silicone caulking and sealant to seal it up. you still want to build a riser somehow for your drums to help isolate the sound. mine is similar design. slighty more expensive. but more stable and sturdy. i used cynder blocks. those big concrete blocks that have 2 holes. you see them used to build walls alot. they are cheap. and i used a piece of 6x8 ply wood. i layed thecynder blocks out in an area big enough to let the plywood have something underneath it. it actualy had an inch or 2 all the way around it that was extra outside the ply wood whiche worked out. i layed the layer of blocks. then a big slab of carpet insulation. then the plywood. and then more carpet insulation. it works pretty well. and is more than en ough room for my set. the way you lay the blocks may vary depending on how you really want to go about it. you can lay them flat side up/down. or holes up/down. wont change a whole lot. i layed them flat up/down for more area. you can lay another layer of blocks with a layer of carpet foam between them if you wish.but this really wont do any difference. also the blocks are a LOT stronger than milk crates. a note i left off earlier. when puttin foam and things over a garage door ont he inside. if your just going to have it up while your in there. be sure that it goes at least 6in-1ft over all of the edges sot hat it covers the gap. and the floor gap you can cut it so that it lays over flat with the floor. it helps some. theres no cheap way to seriously stop the noise. but this will help cut alot of it without too much cash gone
 

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
Get those drums off the ground using a riser
Put some panels in front of your kit
build a room inside of a room leaving a 12" air space in between,we used to rehearse late at night and nobody complained, Hang moving blankets 6" from the sheet rock
Air space is the best for sound proofing, Insulate the inside of the garage walls and sheet rock them
www.myspace.com/bonefacemusic
 

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
Do you still want to use the door ?
Then use moving blankets
Use rubber strips for the cracks that can be removed when you use the door,Foam rubber works good also
 

gumby

New member
scrubs knows nothing about this i take it...bass traps do alot...i do this for a living...for the likes of T.I. Ludacris DJ Toomp...Ect.....so i must know something about stoping bass...hmmm let me think on that one...ummm yup...so if you havent a clue dont speak...so...get ya some 6lb 2in fiberglass (same thing thats used in most studios) and line your garage door with it....also make yourself a cheap gobo to put in front of your kit...you can line it with whatever you want...
 

grey_fox

New member
Thanks everyone you are really helpfull!

I shall check out your site gumby and paulzilla your comment is awesome shall try and get to work on all of that soon but the bass traps may be a problem since there is quite a bit of crap at the back of the garage and i think my dad wants to keep it *sigh*

But the tips for the chalkline and filler are awesome, i work in an ironmongery shop so i get stuff like that for less than wholesale price!

Cheers once again!
 

scrubs

New member
gumby":26q4l4p5 said:
scrubs knows nothing about this i take it...bass traps do alot...i do this for a living...for the likes of T.I. Ludacris DJ Toomp...Ect.....so i must know something about stoping bass...hmmm let me think on that one...ummm yup...so if you havent a clue dont speak...so...get ya some 6lb 2in fiberglass (same thing thats used in most studios) and line your garage door with it....also make yourself a cheap gobo to put in front of your kit...you can line it with whatever you want...
What you are describing is acoustic treatment to deal with reflections within the room. Not that they won't diminish sound from escaping the garage/room -- they will, to some extent. But they won't stop it, particularly in the bass frequencies. Bass travels through the floor/walls quite easily, so even if you cover every square inch of the room (including the floor) with 2" of rigid fiberglass, you won't stop the bass from escaping -- not by a long shot.

While I appreciate your name dropping, unless you can offer assistance that is backed up by basic principles of physics, you're not really helping.
 
Actually I had the same problem with my garage, when a friend of mine requested putting carpeting over the garage door, it basically stopped the garage door from becoming a huge vibrating speaker, and for a practice space, when we needed it, it worked out pretty well. I put quite a bit of the thickest and most dense carpet I could find up, it didn't stop the noise but brought the noise level down considerably. Adding some carpet directly to the garage door then hanging some in front of the door might create a small baffle, helping to reduce some noise, it definatley won't be sound proof, but it may help.. You might be able to get away with foaming some of the gaps that exist between the door etc.

It's almost impossible to stop sound, you have to have extremely dense material, eg: thick rubber sheets, plexy glass, something that will deaden the sound on the wall facing the practice space, then you have to have an internal baffle to allow for the sound to bounce back and forth before finally exiting the outer face of the wall. It's a pain to do without spending some money.
Hope that helped.
The room inside a room idea is definatley the way to go, but it's costly.
 

break the prism

New member
what the band and i did was all throw in for drywall, foam rubber, and carpeting. we hung the dry wall around the walls and ceiling, attached the foam rubber to the walls (use staples, nails, or adhesive), then carpeted the floor and ceiling. we did this in a basement, so we made our own little room with a door made of wood and drywall which we carpeted as well. (the thing is, with a garage you can't achieve full effect because of the style of doors).
you should try to have the drums in the center or at least facing away from nearby walls. have all of the amps all facing the inside and slightly removed from the wall, and what we did was drape cardboard boxes over the amps to prevent sounds from excaping the general area.
 

gOneMaD

New member
3/4 inch sheet rock, sound stop which is 4x8 foot wood panels you can find at home depot and carpet. This works so good its ridiculous. You can also double up any of the three for more protection. Sound Stop is the shit. Oh and don't forget some thermal and sound control insulation. Not the cheapest stuff but the best way I've found so far after 4 different band rooms.
 
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