sound enhancement - shell cutting

Mattayo

New member
has anybody got any experience in this?
i've seen holes cut into the shell of the snare and been told it increases volume. But i've never heard it being played like this.. I'm recording debut e.p with my band in a few weeks and wondered if doing this would help out atall aswell? plus gigs follow..
if it is a good thing.. would you recommend a bit of D.I.Y or can you get them pro cut?
 

Shalaq

New member
Why would you want a louder snare. The mics can do that job. Plus cutting a hole in the drum means less shell. If you pay for a 14x5.5 snare, pay for the whole shell! ;)
 

drummert2k

New member
Agree, mic's will make your drum louder. cutting holes (a.k.a. venting your snare) will just slightly increase your attack but you'll loose some snare sesitivity.
 

anavrinIV

New member
drummert2k":2woanjxq said:
Agree, mic's will make your drum louder. cutting holes (a.k.a. venting your snare) will just slightly increase your attack but you'll loose some snare sesitivity.
not true. ventes snares are very sensitive because they have more sound properties of a piccolo with the less shell material. vented snares are great if youre looking for a loud, dry snare with more depth than a piccolo. i have one and i love it.
 

drummert2k

New member
when i said sensetitvity, i ment with the reso head and snares. not the over all drum. my bad for not being clear. but adding holes will let more air escape before it reaches the reso head.

anavrinIV said it great. its like a dry piccolo. because alot of the air leaves the drum before it has a chance to work its magic on the reso head.
 

Mattayo

New member
so.. could i vent the snare as an alternative to buying a piccolo? is that what your saying? :?
 

drummert2k

New member
no, not as an alternative. go tou a mucis store and play a vented snare before you go a drill a snare you like. or if you have a crappy old snare do that one first. just incase you dont like it, you wont ruin a good snare
 

Mattayo

New member
makes a whole lotta sense (Y)
might do that.. but like.. wasn't actually looking for a new snare or anything.. gotta lush one. it's always cool to just go and try stuff out though! =]
 

Daneman

New member
Large vents dry out the overall sound- because the air escapes quicker, the attack is quicker and dryer with less decay.

There is a point though where too many or too large vents can be counterproductive- the air escapes so quickly that you're not really hearing any of the properties of the shell itself, just the heads reacting to each other. Why spend the extra cash for a maple drum if you're going to void any of its advantages?

I'm not a fan of large vents- if you want more sensitivity, get a shallower snare. If you want the drum to be louder, just play it that way- lots of rimshots, etc.- and have a good sound guy who can EQ and gate the drums properly (you have to remember that 90% of recorded drum sounds- snare in particular- don't actually sound like that in person. It's all studio tricks).
 
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