Soloing

drumschick07

New member
Alright, my senior year is almost over and the talent show is coming up. I decided that I want to do a drum solo for it, but I'm not really the greatest at putting a solo together. I've been playing five years. I've always played in a church and on my own time. I've never actually soloed longer than 30 seconds at church. I think I play well, so I'm not really lacking the skills needed to play a good solo I just need help putting one together.

I just wanted to know what you guys think is important to do in a drum solo and what types of things (double bass, fills, etcc...) can help me win this thing.

And as far as constructing a solo, how should I start and finish, what type of beats should I do??
 

drumsforlife

New member
What I do is come up with a rhythm that I use for the "verse" section. Then I come up with a rhythm that's either a variation or completely different for the "chorus." After a regular progression of the two, like you'd find in a song, I slip into a solo section that's free form and has no meter. After a few minutes in the solo section, I slip back into the original "verse" section, only this time I make sure and use a variation; maybe throw it into a different meter, or add tambourine to the snare hit, you get the idea. After the "verse" I go into a little "bridge" section where I can utilize dynamics to get energy leading into the final "chorus" section. I usually end with repeating the "chorus" two or three times.

I hope this helps. If not, youtube some professionals soloing, just by themselves. They're always good inspiration. And I hope you do well in the talent show.
 

break the prism

New member
what i do is try to decide on a style to build my solo off of (ie jazz, funk, metal). i play a normal beat like i would do in a song, and two measures into it i improvise off of that beat. if i want to switch time signatures or pulse or anything i go back to the original beat and vary the meter or the feel. then i improvise off of that.
 

drumschick07

New member
The things is that the judges won't be judging me on technique or how fast or hard my fills are. I gotta make the people like it too! I don't know if doing something a little more simple would be better. Not sure.
I could be doing this crazy fill that sounds great to a drummer, but isn't pleasing to a person who doesn't play.
 

break the prism

New member
i sometimes like to throw in either a familiar drum lick (from When the Levee Breaks, Hot for Teacher, etc), or a part from one of my band's songs played earlier in the set that people seemed to like.
i also like to throw in some call and response stuff (have the audience clap the rhythm after i play it). a lot of things can spice up your solo.
 

drumschick07

New member
break the prism said:
i sometimes like to throw in either a familiar drum lick (from When the Levee Breaks, Hot for Teacher, etc), or a part from one of my band's songs played earlier in the set that people seemed to like.
i also like to throw in some call and response stuff (have the audience clap the rhythm after i play it). a lot of things can spice up your solo.[/qote]u


Sounds like a great idea w/ the response stuff. What other songs do u think I could play that would be familiar with? I listen a lot of old and new rock, so some people might not be as faimliar with van halen, motley crue, etc... as I am. A lot of kids these days like rap (I personally can't stand it).
 

break the prism

New member
if your audience isn't into classics, then you're better off watching for beats in your band's songs that they all seem to respond to.
not many new popular bands have really distinct drum licks.
 

mattdoesrock

New member
Personally I like to start solos of slowly, then build it up and rip into it. But like some guys have said, you almost need to play your solo like song. Some bits need to be quiter (verses) and other bits can be louder / flashier - like a chorus.

For talent shows, even the smallest things can impress and wow both the croud and judges. Things like stick twirling can be great for example. Also, finding a funky, really catchy beat can be great - audiences love that.

Good luck man, and most of all - have fun!
 

drumschick07

New member
Thanks guys! What you've said has helped a lot.

If you have certain beats that you think would impress a crowd (like in a song or something) just let me know. I need something catchy. I would really like to get up there and play some dream theater, but the crowd wouldn't really like it. What about some guns n roses or something?

As you guys can see I'm not the most creative. I almost feel like you do when someone asks you the name of a song and you just can't remember it until 3 days later! I just can't think of a good beat. Its getting to be crunch time and I'm stressing out!

I was going to do a bunch of stuff with double bass, but like I said simple might be better.
 

drumsforlife

New member
Just a thought. Try working the crowd and asking them to name off genres or styles, and then you play them. I call it playing "Stump the drummer..." I did it at my last gig and it was a hit. I played everything from hip-hop, to gospel, to funk, to jazz, to reggae... Somebody asked me to play speed metal and I hesitated and that was the end. It was great.
 
Top