Seriously, that was you!

s1ngleton

New member
Timing is one the most (arguably the most) valuable assets of any drummer. My timing is my greatest asset, personally, and I take a specific pride in my ability to stay in the pocket and keep the groove moving in any song, be it cut and dry punk beat or any off the hook groove with a jacked up jazzy feel.

I bet there are a lot of others out there just like me in that regard. When I fall out of time, I take it seriously and usually beat myself up over it. I admit it whole heartedly. But, the problem is...sometimes the other guys fall off beat. But when that happens, the blame NEVER goes on them!!

So my question is rather simple, how many others out there are also left holdin' the bag when the problem isn't yours?
 

mouse

New member
one word for when the other musicians go out of time and the drummer gets blamed- egos. 'Nuff said. lol.

Seriously though, sometimes you'll find this happens and it's one of those many other drummer jobs we've got when playing. Sometimes you can feel the bass player or guitarist or whoever trying to pull you faster than what you should be, but you've got to stand your ground and try and rein them in. Hard to explain though as to how you do it. If you catch them quick enough you can really accent some of the beats to signify that's where they should be and not six years in front. But try not to make it obvious to anyone watching. Really means being 'in tune' with your bandmates.

But unless you're playing to a click, you'll probably find you'll always get the blame even if it's not your fault as there's no way of really proving your case without one. Sometimes just take the criticism and then just play again, and generally they've re-ajusted themselves without noticing.

If they keep saying your off time, and all the other instruments are ahead/ 'out of time' with you, then there could be the possiblity that it might be you.

Generally, consider all angles. And remember guitarists are not reasonable people. In fact I wonder if they're human at all... :lol: :wink:

Sarah x
 

zen_drummer

New member
mouse":1z9vn4km said:
Generally, consider all angles. And remember guitarists are not reasonable people. In fact I wonder if they're human at all... :lol: :wink:

Sarah x
I've yet to meet one that's human, but that's just me...

Seriously though, get a BEAT BUG, learn how to use it and drive the band to the right tempo, it's what you do for a living, may as well do it well!
 

Gaddabout

New member
The level of players I play with, staying in time is rarely an issue. We fight more over how we interpret time, trying to capture magic. That becomes a more delicate issue the longer you play.

 

The Alien Drummer

New member
I had the same problem in one of my bands with other players rushing.

My solution: Practice as a band with a metronome/click track. Then live everyone will be used to playing in time. A lot of people (including myself) use it live also. Not for everything, but I do for 90% of the songs. Now all I get is "I can't believe how slow that felt" from one guy while the other was saying"that felt too fast." But we were playing at the same speed as we played it 100 times before. Rarely is everyone in the same frame of mind every night. It's total freedom from being the scapegoat.

I would like to add this also. I'm an old timer who cursed metronomes for live stuff. It wasn't until I became good friends with another drummer who plays all electronic sequenced music that I gave it a try. After experiencing the freedom it gives me I will never go back. It allows me to experiment with time and never get lost. All while eliminating being accused of rushing or falling behind. For most songs I really dig it. IMO.

Hope that helps! :)
 

markt36264

New member
I laid down some tracks with some young players around 15 years ago. My time was solid and it sounded good to begin with. Later they came back and dubbed some guitar parts all out of time. When listening to their finished product, it sounded like I was all over the place.

Another time I was recording with some pros and I was having trouble staying with the click. The pickers went with me and in the end it sounded fine.

Now days (live situations), I think I listen to the players more than I concentrate on laying it down solid and hoping they go with me. My opinion, every musician in a group has the same responsibility to listen to each other and play with good meter. It isn't just the drummers job to hold it together. Any one player with bad time can make things fall apart.
 

Flatliner

New member
I've never had a problem with the whole time thing, but I've always played with poeple who were trained musicians and had played in Orchestras and other musical ensambles where being in time was very important and they were used to following a conductor and listening to the tempo of the percussion.

Also were the hell do you poeple find these so called "guitarists", the guitarists I've played with have been amazing. One of my best friends is a guitarist and he has amazing time and can solo really well in crazy figures without losing the beat.
 

blackreign

New member
I always got blamed for this in my old band, my brother me and my friend were always in time...

but this guy wasn't
and he would always blame till I asked him to time the song without us playing, and he couldn't do it...
 

zerodogma

New member
One of my favorite quotes (and I am paraphrasing here) is from Carter Beauford of The Dave Mathews Band... "It is my job to keep the beat at a constant, but every musician on stage (or wherever) has to know where the "1" is..."

ALL musicians need to have a solid feel for time, PERIOD! If the guitarist, bassist, keyboard player, singer, violinist, or whatever cannot keep a basic beat, then start working with active "clicks" during practice.

I guess I am lucky to work with musicians who have a great sense of "time". I set the tempo, and the rest flows like KY :wink: (although our singer has a terrible time with phrasing his lyrics! LOL)
 

freddy5g

New member
solid feel is key, everyone know's that. But feel doesn't necessarily imply perfection. I've been in bands where band mates freak out on each other for not being perfect...it's retarded. Some of the best times I've had is when I or a band mate fuck up and we can look at each other and smile. I mean, when it interferes with the flow of the song I get pissed too, but when it's minor and something that most people wouldn't even recognize, that shit should be cherished.
 

Gazdkw82§

New member
my bass player always does this... he trys to play too many notes and if he struggles he blames me, its very anoying... whats the beatbug doo?
 

blackreign

New member
Gazdkw82§":686ne6o0 said:
my bass player always does this... he trys to play too many notes and if he struggles he blames me, its very anoying... whats the beatbug doo?
get him to time it himself by himself, and have the guitarist or any other members time it, then correct him

if he makes a big deal about it, record a jam session on video and have him count how many times he played it while watching the video (you keep track of it too)

then talk to him about it...
Like I said earlier I got blamed for something like that in my last band, and thats why me my brother and my friend left it, and formed our own
 

s1ngleton

New member
freddy5g":37ptpslc said:
solid feel is key, everyone know's that. But feel doesn't necessarily imply perfection. I've been in bands where band mates freak out on each other for not being perfect...it's retarded. Some of the best times I've had is when I or a band mate fuck up and we can look at each other and smile. I mean, when it interferes with the flow of the song I get pissed too, but when it's minor and something that most people wouldn't even recognize, that shit should be cherished.
you hit the nail on the head here. I've always had an opinion that I love to watch a band fuck up live. During these instances, true professionalism can be seen, as long as they play it off right and even have fun with it. No one likes to hear the singer bitching and moaning to the crowd at the end of the song going "sorry but the drummer really fucked that last one up."

Obviously, no one's perfect, even if you're playing with a group that has much more fundamental talent than the average. And ultimately it's just a slight nuisance to be a drummer that gets unfairly blamed for falling out of time. It's all about how you play it off live.
 

john_bonham73

New member
the topic is right on friggen time,Im telling ya.I usually let things go,believe me but,this last band situation I was in really got to me.And this thread really explains what I've been saying to them all along.Some of you may have read my thread..."maybe Im the one thats screwed up?" Other band members kept falling out of time with me,especially the bass player and guess who got the blame? It happened so much,I started to think it was me.And if you know me guys,you would know if I F'D up...I would admit it.If Im to blame,I would stand up and take it.Thanks for putting this out there!
 

lowdrummer

New member
i have this problem, but with another drummer. In my jazz class there are two drummers, me and the other, and he is always slowing down and speeding up! We tell him all the time but his egg is sobig that he constantly is blaming the rest of the band. its pretty anoying.
 
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