"ROCK" snares

Dale

New member
Just about anything from 5 1/2 X 14" to larger. Metal, wood, I don't think it makes a difference as long as you like the sound.
 

loop

New member
ROCKET SHELLS SKETCH":39bzqaw0 said:
classic rock prob 14"x8"


Personally I would not go for 14x8. Anything from14x5.5 to 14x6.5 provides enough power and depth as well and is more versatile at the same time.
 
I rock a 14"x8" Mapex snare. Holy good god its loud and the rimshot "Crack" it carries is deafning. My band mate complain when i do rimshots when im jamming on my own. For example of loudness I was playing at a bar and now one was paying attention while we were setting up i gave my snare 3 hard rimshots. People seriously jumped. After i was told some people thought a gun went off!!!!!!!![/b]
 

Dillface

New member
THEunderUSEDoath33":4909giwy said:
I rock a 14"x8" Mapex snare. Holy good god its loud and the rimshot "Crack" it carries is deafning. My band mate complain when i do rimshots when im jamming on my own. For example of loudness I was playing at a bar and now one was paying attention while we were setting up i gave my snare 3 hard rimshots. People seriously jumped. After i was told some people thought a gun went off!!!!!!!![/b]
Hmmmm.... :D You just gave me interest in buying it
 

makes

New member
THE rock snare of all time has to be the Ludwig Supraphonic 6.5x14 aka the bonham snare. Its the simple chrome snare drum. Not the chrome over brass.

I have one, also the 5x14 model supraphonic sound great as well. I have one also.


makes
 

strongdrummer

New member
METALCHRIS":13use3jy said:
What kind of snare would ( or do ) you use for a classic "BIG" sound ?
Something for 4/4 driving hard rock
A Mapex Bronze Black panther. Tune it right down and you'll get a really thick sound that makes a deep impact. Stick an Emperor X on it, chop that wood, and pay homage to the thickness!
 

TinChimp

New member
Any thing 14" x 5" or deeper should do the Trick, personally I like a Maple snare, but try a few till you find one you really like. The Skins also make a big difference, really light gauge snare side heads are a must, I tried putting a Remo PinStripe on the playing side and it was punchy as hell (bloody rubbish if you were playing anything jazzy or funky) but it sounded like it had been miked up and effected. Another trick I sometimes use in the studio is to tune my snare up as i normally would do (quite hi pitched by preference) and then loosen off the two lugs nearest to me so the skin wrinkles slightly between them, this seems to give the drum alot of bottom end punch making it sound like a much deeper drum.
Hope this is usefull
Tris "TinChimp" Hall
 

loop

New member
TinChimp":nx2wqw58 said:
Another trick I sometimes use in the studio is to tune my snare up as i normally would do (quite hi pitched by preference) and then loosen off the two lugs nearest to me so the skin wrinkles slightly between them, this seems to give the drum alot of bottom end punch making it sound like a much deeper drum.l

Sounds interesting. I'm gonna try that!
 

zen_drummer

New member
makes":7uuy33yl said:
THE rock snare of all time has to be the Ludwig Supraphonic 6.5x14 aka the bonham snare. Its the simple chrome snare drum. Not the chrome over brass.
If you listen to an old rock classic and wonder what the snare drum sound is, there's about a 90% Chance that you're listening to your basic ludalloy Supraphonic.

The Ludwig Supraphonic series... Both the 6.5 x 14 and the 5x14 are responsible for the backbeat in more rock and roll songs than ALL OTHER drums combined... They are THE classic rock sound.

While wood snares were availble during the 60's, 70's and 80's, they didn't become wildly popular for Rock until the late 80's when Yamaha started to really push wood signature series snare drums.
 

LadyThunder

New member
I play a lot of hard/grunge rock, and prefer a deep punchy "Snare with Balls!" sound...

I recently got the Pork Pie Big Black Brass Snare 14" x 6.5" with a Powerstroke 3 batter head. It definately gives me the deep punch i've been looking for, and the thick head reduces the ringing through the brass shell, giving it more of a dry sound...
 

coffeeleafmusic

New member
A rouck sound has many shapes and sounds and comes in many forms. It depends on what you feel is "rock". Most people tend to go for a 5 1/2 x 14 snare size for that "big" feel....and up to 6 1/2 to 7 x 14. Then it comes to what material are you using...metal? Wood? acrylic? ....glass?...haha...glass is a funny one but...i've seen it done. That will give you your "richness in sound"....or depth, so to say.....then....to add on to the expense list....you have your heads....1 ply...2ply....ebony?....clear?....cow skin?...haha.... But...in essence, the music and how you apply your drum is what makes the sound. I've seen drummers in "big rock bands" use 13' diameter drums and get away with it. It depends on how specific do you want your drum sound to be....and.....compare it to the band your playing with....what colors the guitar distortion better. The great thing about drums are.....they are infinately definable.

Just my 2 cents
-c-
 

DRUMMER46AND2

New member
I use a 6 1/2 deep Pearl maple free floater but I do have a 8" deep Gretsch Maple custom (red rosewood finish) if I need to play some "metal." I am giving some thought to puting it up for auction. This bastard is LOUD!
 

Zim

New member
I have 6 snares and I find for a loud sound I have a pearl copper free floating head snare and IT IS LOUD, PUNCHY, AND WILL GIVE YOU MORE CRACK THAN A DOWNTOWN HUSTLER!!
 
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