Rims: What's the Difference?

FelterSkelter

New member
I see that like every other accessory, there are multiple types of rims and hoops for drums. Can someone tell me the advantages or disadvantages of the different types? (i.e.- double flanged, triple....)
 

Groove

New member
Die cast hoops are considered the best to have (as opposed to flanged or "power" hoops). Die cast hoops are stonger, flex a lot less and give a much more even tension across the head when tuning. I didn't use to believe they made that much of a difference until I replace some powerhoops on a snare with die cast hoops. I noticed a big difference.

Hope this helps!
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Groove":lrjfmp9k said:
Die cast hoops are considered the best to have (as opposed to flanged or "power" hoops). Die cast hoops are stonger, flex a lot less and give a much more even tension across the head when tuning. I didn't use to believe they made that much of a difference until I replace some powerhoops on a snare with die cast hoops. I noticed a big difference.

Hope this helps!
Thanks for the info. What kind of difference did it make? Big difference in the sound? In which way?
 

Groove

New member
FelterSkelter":dojy1ead said:
Groove":dojy1ead said:
Die cast hoops are considered the best to have (as opposed to flanged or "power" hoops). Die cast hoops are stonger, flex a lot less and give a much more even tension across the head when tuning. I didn't use to believe they made that much of a difference until I replace some powerhoops on a snare with die cast hoops. I noticed a big difference.

Hope this helps!
Thanks for the info. What kind of difference did it make? Big difference in the sound? In which way?
Whether it makes a "big" difference or any difference at all is really just an opinion. But in my opinion, they do make a pretty big difference. They do make it easiser to tune - at least to me.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Groove":3vdgvdgl said:
FelterSkelter":3vdgvdgl said:
Groove":3vdgvdgl said:
Die cast hoops are considered the best to have (as opposed to flanged or "power" hoops). Die cast hoops are stonger, flex a lot less and give a much more even tension across the head when tuning. I didn't use to believe they made that much of a difference until I replace some powerhoops on a snare with die cast hoops. I noticed a big difference.

Hope this helps!
Thanks for the info. What kind of difference did it make? Big difference in the sound? In which way?
Whether it makes a "big" difference or any difference at all is really just an opinion. But in my opinion, they do make a pretty big difference. They do make it easiser to tune - at least to me.
I was told that a heavier hoop would increase sustain ( I'm sure it's a negligible difference). Do the die cast hoops STAY in tune better as well?

I'm just wondering this all because I'm always looking for ways to upgrade my set and hardware without buying a new setup all together. Thanks for your help. I know that there is little to TALK about when it comes to sound.
 

RogersDrummer

New member
Personally, I like maple wood hoops the most. They really open up the tonal possibilities of the drum.

As far as Die-cast and tripple-flange hoops go, I think the main difference that you can notice, is there's alot less conflicting overtones with die-cast, then there are with tripple-flange. But, that all depends on how you tune it. Die-cast hoops seem to be easier to tune with.

Die-cast hoops come in different metal types. It seems, the less the metal wieghs, the less it chokes the drum. Zinc die-cast hoops are the lightest i believe.

The best thing to do is just to hear for yourself. Opinions on this matter tend to vary alot.

Rob
 

dtran09

New member
RogersDrummer":217b4kpm said:
Personally, I like maple wood hoops the most. They really open up the tonal possibilities of the drum.

As far as Die-cast and tripple-flange hoops go, I think the main difference that you can notice, is there's alot less conflicting overtones with die-cast, then there are with tripple-flange. But, that all depends on how you tune it. Die-cast hoops seem to be easier to tune with.

Die-cast hoops come in different metal types. It seems, the less the metal wieghs, the less it chokes the drum. Zinc die-cast hoops are the lightest i believe.

The best thing to do is just to hear for yourself. Opinions on this matter tend to vary alot.

Rob
Oh yeah, forgot about wood hoops. :roll: I have heard even better things about those. Don't know how they slipped my mind.
 

Rockula!

New member
Toms are not much of a necessity for me but I am spoiled on die cast hoops on my snares
All 3 of my snares have them and I am hooked
Being that I use 85% rimshots when I play, the die cast hoop has been incredibly important in developing my style
There's nothing like smacking that stick straight across a die cast hoop and hearing that CRACK!!!!!
Does that mean I am addicted to crack?

No one has ever been at one of my gigs and said "Gee, I wish I could hear the snare"
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Thanks again for the info all. I've played on wood hoops and really liked them as well.
I guess from here on out I'll have to experiment.
 

skitch

New member
Groove":3rz5n1rj said:
Die cast hoops are considered the best to have (as opposed to flanged or "power" hoops). Die cast hoops are stonger, flex a lot less and give a much more even tension across the head when tuning. I didn't use to believe they made that much of a difference until I replace some powerhoops on a snare with die cast hoops. I noticed a big difference.

Hope this helps!
Snare drum - yes diecast are great! On toms, they tend to muffle the sound out of the toms.
 

andybfrank

New member
My Gretsch kit has die cast hoops. They do kill some of the overtones and give it a more focused tone, which sounds awesome on the toms. I just made a snare drum and put triple flanged hoops on it for a more ringy sound. It rings out a lot more than the Gretsch with die cast hoops. The Gretsch snare is tuned low, like a tom and the homemade snare is tuned high.

My tastes are oppisite from the guy's above. I like the toms "muffled" a bit and the snare to ring out.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
I've recently changed my snare heads and in doing so I noticed that the Gibraltar replacement hoop on the batter side was much more solid than the ones that came with my Ludwig kit.
 

hasthespaz

New member
I heard that

Die cast- cuts overtones/some resonance
Wooden hoops- Helps natural drum tones

not sure if this is the case.. Shall i buy wooden hoops for my new kit, or stick with normal hoops?
 

satanJohn

New member
Wood hoops give a drum a very noticable fatter tone. I had a bass drum that came with metal hoops and I replaced them with wooden ones. The Metal hoops gave the drum more high end ring. The cheap bass drum sounded tinny with its stock metal hoops but sounded fine with wood. The same difference in tone holds true with snare and toms too.
You need to consider what you are going to be using the kit for and your playing style. If a nice fat tone is your main goal, wood is best; if being heard over the guitars is a concern, you would be better off with metal rims. If you are a really hard hitter and like to play rim shots, metal would be better unless you have lots of money to replace wood hoops. I have 8 ply maple hoops on all my drums and they are all suspended on RIMS mounts. My 6x12 snare sounds like an old parade drum. The RIMS mount has a lot to do with that too.
 

hasthespaz

New member
satanJohn":3cd6ycrh said:
Wood hoops give a drum a very noticable fatter tone. I had a bass drum that came with metal hoops and I replaced them with wooden ones. The Metal hoops gave the drum more high end ring. The cheap bass drum sounded tinny with its stock metal hoops but sounded fine with wood. The same difference in tone holds true with snare and toms too.
You need to consider what you are going to be using the kit for and your playing style. If a nice fat tone is your main goal, wood is best; if being heard over the guitars is a concern, you would be better off with metal rims. If you are a really hard hitter and like to play rim shots, metal would be better unless you have lots of money to replace wood hoops. I have 8 ply maple hoops on all my drums and they are all suspended on RIMS mounts. My 6x12 snare sounds like an old parade drum. The RIMS mount has a lot to do with that too.
cheers man, i would like a nice fat tone, but scared of accidental rim shots, i hit pretty hard.. i may get metal then buy wooden ones later on this year, see if i like them better
 

Gaddabout

New member
I love wood hoops, but I would never put them on a kit I would be moving a lot. You see more wood hoops these days for guys with home studios. Mic a maple tom with maple wood hoops, and you can tell a difference. In a live situation it's more of a visual, and probably not worth the cost of replacing them when it inevitably happens.

Personally, I think putting more money into die-cast hoops on an entry level kit is probably going to have more impact than putting that same money into a lower-mid-level kit with entry level hardware. Die-cast hoops (2.3 MM!) can help you achieve a pro sound from a mahogany kit.

Other things you can do with an entry level kit to make it more like a pro kit (without anyone knowing):

- Have the bearing edges recut. If you have a double-sided 45 degree cut, consider getting it rounded, or going more extreme. Often times the bearing edges on entry level kits are mediocre. Having them recut to the same measurements by a professional drum worker may immediately improve the sound and performance of your drum. The cost is generally $25 to $45, depending on the drum.

- Consider maple reinforcement rings. Pacific has used these on their low-end kits with great success. Honestly? They sound great to me. They provide a stabilizing factor to the tone.

- Upgrade your tom hardware. Turn your floor toms into hanging toms. There are all kinds of things you can do to give your toms more tone, sustain, whatever you're looking for.

- Upgrade the heads. This seems like a no-brainer, but heads are a HUGE part of any drum's sound and I see guys playing with El Cheapo heads all the time. Change batter and reso heads. Don't go cheap on these. You will be surprised at how much better your drums will sound with quality heads. If you've always had two-ply heads, try a good single-ply head. If you've always had single-play, try a good two-ply head.

- New wrap or finish! If you already like the sound of your kit, consider a new custom look for your kit. Make it look like you've spent a great deal more than you really have.

I did all of the above on an old Export kit that was my primary gigging kit for several years. I don't have any qualms with Pearl at all -- the kit was great -- but I always sort of enjoyed that people thought I was playing a custom maple kit. It was really just a mass-manufactured mahogany kit. ;)
 
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