Right hand and foot stick together

azorane

New member
Hi all!

I started to play drums for 2weeks now and I'm a top beginner with many starting problems playing the drums. So that i need your help.

I've already found many exercises that helps you practice the weakest hand (my case, the left one) but I haven't found any for that "right hand and foot sticky rhythm". While doing for example a 4 time rhythm with right hand and another one with drum bass foot my right hand tends to do the same as the foot.

Sorry about my English, it's a little poor. I'll try to explain other way.

Example: (Playing on bold)

Right hand on hit hats:
1&2&3&4 | 1&2&3&4 | etc...

And I want the right foot to do this:
1&2&3&4 | 1&2&3&4 | etc...

Any exercise that could help me to cut the damn line connected between my hand and foot?

Many thanks to you all!

Raul
 

kylevater

New member
its just going to take, you guessed it, time and practice
its very key to learn that very early on, which you are very smart for doing
it will come over time as you get further down the drumming path
what i did was to make sure my high hat is always going at the same note, while i just concentrate on the snare and bass
once you can get your mind off keeping the high hat going, itll be easy
 

cableman26

New member
Hey brother welcome. This is a problem we all face. Do you have a metronome? If not get one, they are gold. Start out slowly I'm talking maybe 70 Beats Per Minute, with your right hand do quarter notes as you described. Then with your feet do para-diddles. RLRR LRLL. You may not play a double pedal, but this will help to establish foot independence. I'm no pro, but that's what helps me. It's hard at first but you get it.
 

azorane

New member
:) I didn't guess it! I know it! I know I must give some time to it and go slow. It's a fact that sometimes it's frustrating to see that line (invisible) connected between the parts of my body, but that's the natural evolution.

I have a metronome on my computer but didn't used it a lot. I've been playing random musics from my play list just for fun. But I'll start seriously this week.

Tks for the advices

:D
 

kylevater

New member
playing to a song can be a very good way to get that seperation of your limb coordination
divide the song into small sections, in maybe 10 second sections, unless it switches the beat completely
just play each part until you get it
 

stephenchong

New member
I'm not very good in drums but here's my advice though.

For that pattern, why dont you try doing 1&2 (for the leg) together with 1 &2 (for the hands) first ? After you master that little part you add on to the whole pattern.

The point is, cut down parts that are difficult and tackle them one at a time. Then add all the difficult parts together and you'll master the pattern. This goes for any patterns, at least that how i learn them. Take a whole lot of patience. Good luck ! :)
 

stephenchong

New member
stephenchong":1cfkk07x said:
I'm not very good in drums but here's my advice though.

For that pattern, why dont you try doing 1&2 (for the leg) together with 1 &2 (for the hands) first ? After you master that little part you add on to the whole pattern.

The point is, cut down parts that are difficult and tackle them one at a time. Then add all the difficult parts together and you'll master the pattern. This goes for any patterns, at least that how i learn them. Take a whole lot of patience. Good luck ! :)
Oh crap my bold is screwed. What i meant was for the leg, [1&2 (all bold)]. For the hands, [1&2 (only ur 1,2 is bold)]
Whoops !
 

dav_4550

New member
I am a lefty and when I started playing I had the same problem, but one day my brain magically understood what signals it needed to send through my body to make my foot do what I had been trying to do all along, then it seemed so easy that I couldn't imagine not being able to do it. so just keep trying and one day you will surprise yourself
 

frnk_hggns

New member
I'm still pretty much a beginner too, but the way i worked on this is just concentrating on keeping the beat
on your right hand steady. I started out really slow first with the beat, and eventually it became really easy
to do without even thinking about it.
My 2 cents.
 

Homki890

New member
Try this little exercise.

First, keep the quarter notes going on the hats steady. those won't change.

Now, for 8 measures, hit the bass drum on 1. Just one hit. Next 8 measures, hit the bass drum on the + of one (the "and"). Next 8, on beat 2, and so on down the measure. Be sure to start at a very manageable tempo, and not to strain or stress. If you feel tension start to creep up, stop, rest for a few seconds, and try again. These things take practice, and over time, it'll start to come together. Lucky for you, this is a fairly simple problem to overcome, so about a week or two weeks from now, you should have little to no trouble placing your foot on any of the beats. Now, your foot is more independent of your hands, and can play what you want them to.

Happy drumming.

Homki890
 

meddler

New member
Homki890, I have been following what you said and slowly its starting to pay off, I am occassionally slipping but for the most parts i feel full independance. Thats a real helpful exercise, cheers.
 

DrumsPlus

New member
Hey guy welcome. I worked with my son on something similar to this. What he used was this:

1234on the hats
1234 on the snare
1&2&3&4& on the base.

This helped get his foot moving and doing double along with Hat and snare beats.

hope that helps.
 

andytheyoo

New member
The way I teach other drummers when they start to have independence problems is to take the beat very slowly.

Slowly break up the beat in every count. Then slowly build up the speed. *WHILE YOUR COUNTING* This is VERY important. As you gradually keep getting faster and faster, you will notice your leg and arm starts to flow smoothly. My best advice is to take every beats slowly and then start experimenting.
 
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