Reinforcement rings on shells

dammow

New member
i think they were fitted years ago to strengthen the shell and to keep the drum round on a steam bent shell, but also i thing the're supposed to give a deeper sound than normal too. they are an option with some custom drum makers also.
 

dammow

New member
i think so. but im not 100% sure. i think PJ (the guy who makes drums?)would be the one to ask.
 

drumur

New member
Also, I believe they are used for thinner shells.

The 4 ply Pearl Masters have them but the 6 ply don't
 

Timekeep69

New member
They were originally designed to reinforce the shell to keep it from warping. Nowadays they're pretty much a gimmick.
 

joejoeplaysdrums

New member
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
 

keith bushey

New member
I wish my Mapex kit had them, reason being that thay have a much better bearing edge surface. More bearing edge surface gives the drum a fatter, focused sound, and eliminates some over ring.
 

xdoseonex

New member
Timekeep69":3iekvgwd said:
They were originally designed to reinforce the shell to keep it from warping. Nowadays they're pretty much a gimmick.
Heh, that was secretly the answer i was looking for. Thanks for confirming what i thought
 

xdoseonex

New member
joejoeplaysdrums":90o4ud3t said:
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
but what do they do and whats theyre purpose on thin shells.
 

rockon2112yyz

New member
Its like tube/valve guitar amps
Modern technology has outdated them but some still like them to get a vintage sound

Plus its just another reason for DW to keep prices high
 

Timekeep69

New member
keith bushey":2uf5yh5w said:
I wish my Mapex kit had them, reason being that thay have a much better bearing edge surface. More bearing edge surface gives the drum a fatter, focused sound, and eliminates some over ring.
Yes and no, You don't need rings to do that, a 45 degree inner edge and a roundover on the outer edge will give you that. You would only need it on a really thin shell like a 4 or 5 ply.
 

Timekeep69

New member
xdoseonex":ry065041 said:
joejoeplaysdrums":ry065041 said:
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
but what do they do and whats theyre purpose on thin shells.
A little added durability to keep the shell form warping or going out o f round.
 

xdoseonex

New member
Timekeep69":395bubj8 said:
xdoseonex":395bubj8 said:
joejoeplaysdrums":395bubj8 said:
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
but what do they do and whats theyre purpose on thin shells.
A little added durability to keep the shell form warping or going out o f round.

what are the chances of that happening to a well taken care of kit?
 

Timekeep69

New member
xdoseonex":wcgazxu3 said:
Timekeep69":wcgazxu3 said:
xdoseonex":wcgazxu3 said:
joejoeplaysdrums":wcgazxu3 said:
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
but what do they do and whats theyre purpose on thin shells.
A little added durability to keep the shell form warping or going out o f round.

what are the chances of that happening to a well taken care of kit?
Very little.

Drums go out of round due to high humidity or pressure of something being stacked on top of it (not how most people stack their drums). You really have to neglect or abuse a kit for this to happen.
 

stu

New member
If I had a pearl kit from the 50's when they were sold as CB or any of the other fifty distributors that put their name on them. They were only three or four plies of Luan I would want to have rerings if my drum was made with that crap and glues that were used back then were not always that great.
 

SGarrett

New member
joejoeplaysdrums":3l2ucr8u said:
here's the skinny on reinforcement rings. they were put in shells decades ago to keep the shells in round. they needed them ALWAYS then because of the thickness of the plys (go check out a mid 60's slingerland if you need some reference). those shells only had three plies and the plies were wicked thick by todays standards. some companies use them today either because of necessity such as really thin shells (think 4 and 5 ply shells like DW and higher end pearl) or for aesthetics, but very rarely because of sound. yes, they supposedly raise the pitch of the drum.... you probably couldn't tell the difference with your own ear. it's a very minimal raise in pitch due to the increased mass on the shell (but seriously... you couldn't tell). they also shorten the sustain or "ring" in the drum... also due to the increased mass of the shell, but the increased mass is only on the tops and bottoms of the shell - thus restricting the vibrations of the shell in a minimal way. when you're thinking about truly custom drums, i totally dig reinforcement rings. even on the thicker shells, they sound beautiful. the absolute best thing about reinforcement rings is when you put them on thicker shells (like 10 ply), you can have the bearing edges cut to "full round" and get that really smooth old school sound - minimal attack and full bodied sound. they're freakin' great.
Put two identical drums next to each other with the same heads and tuning, one with reinforcement rings and one without. You'll hear the difference. Compared to a completely different drum, you won't.
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Reinforcement rings contribute to the "cut" of the shell's resonance by offering a point in the shell that is thicker. Thicker=stiffer and adds density. Therefore, the sound has a bit more focus. But remember, thicker shells = higher pitches.
 
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