Recording

me and and a bunch of my friends just started an alternative rock band...we dont have alot of money for recording...we dont want something top of the line that cost like $5000....we just want something desent that will do the job rite...we dont have any recording equipment at all...can some one help us?? :(
 

drummert2k

New member
if you lived anywhere near PA i could hook you up at the studio my band record. its a really really good quality recording and its only 50 bucks a song including the set up, mixing and mastering
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
DesiPIMPnLuvinIt":1uz6zetx said:
me and and a bunch of my friends just started an alternative rock band...we dont have alot of money for recording...we dont want something top of the line that cost like $5000....we just want something desent that will do the job rite...we dont have any recording equipment at all...can some one help us?? :(
$5000 will definitely not get you a "top of the line" recording. I suggest practicing, playing gigs for at least a year, and spending as much as you all can save in that time on your CD. It will be worth it to spend good money if you're gonna spend any at all. If you want to just make a homemade demo to get you some gigs, go to guitar center and buy a recording software package (ask the sales guy whats best for you that's within your budget), some decent mics and a 4 channel mixer that you can hook to your computer. All of that will cost $500-$600 and you will always have that gear. Also read Chris Vrenna's Modern Drummer articles on home recording. You should be able to make a demo in your bedroom that will get you into some clubs and you will be able to record new tunes as you get them written.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
Also, in another thread, originaldrummachine suggested the freeware recording program "Audacity". I've used it before, and it's pretty good. With that, all you need is some mics (SM 57's are good all around) and a mixer you can plug into the computer. If you can divide up and record only a couple members at a time (bass& drums, then layer guitars, vocals, etc over that) it will be easier to dial everything in and make it sound better. And maybe try doing it in separate rooms so you don't have bass guitar bleeding into the drum mics. Also use a click if you have one. If you're good at playing to a click, and you know your parts inside out, you can record by yourself to a click. It's harder, but you get better isolation that way, and it's easier to mix.
 
drummert2k":9sc9nzim said:
if you lived anywhere near PA i could hook you up at the studio my band record. its a really really good quality recording and its only 50 bucks a song including the set up, mixing and mastering
Yea..i live in Pittsburgh...do u live near Pittsburgh at all???
 

DrummerByron

New member
SmellsLikeIan":2ro3ko1c said:
Also, in another thread, originaldrummachine suggested the freeware recording program "Audacity". I've used it before, and it's pretty good. With that, all you need is some mics (SM 57's are good all around) and a mixer you can plug into the computer. If you can divide up and record only a couple members at a time (bass& drums, then layer guitars, vocals, etc over that) it will be easier to dial everything in and make it sound better. And maybe try doing it in separate rooms so you don't have bass guitar bleeding into the drum mics. Also use a click if you have one. If you're good at playing to a click, and you know your parts inside out, you can record by yourself to a click. It's harder, but you get better isolation that way, and it's easier to mix.
Yeah, a home recording is the best bet, but if you are set on a studio you can usually find a studio that will offer packages for time, CD duplication and packaging for a reasonable price. My band Pop Destruction got a package deal for $1300 for 10 hours + mixing and an engineer with 50 CDs duplicated. We designed the cover art and sent out for the packaging that ran about $500 for 200 CD covers and 150 more CDs (this was back in ’96). Nowadays it’s much cheaper to get CDs duplicated and packaged.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
You have to start small. Pick your best 3 or 4 songs and go to a studio and make a live demo. This should mean lots of practice so as to not waste valuable studio time. Usually if you do it this way, you can go back and re-track the vocals. Smaller studios will charge $400-$600 for a job like that. If you can find an engineer that likes your music, they may actually work with you a little more to help you get more out of your recording.

If you go this route, pay careful attention to everything in the studio (control room, mic placement, effects, production) and ask questions when possible. It's almost like you're paying for a recording and a lesson on how to record. It's a great experience (especially if you can find someone to work WITH you).
My .02
 

Rockula!

New member
I did not gather what city you are in but here's what I did here in Dallas a couple of times
There is a community college in DFW called "Cedar Valley"
They have a recording course
Those people have to do a demo for their class project
I happened to know someone that was taking the course but all you have to do is go to daid school and post a flyer saing "Band available for recording projects"
Of course, it will be a student project but those places always have great equipment
Cost of each demo that I have done this way ?
0 dollars! (except for the cost of CDs that I dubbed from the session)

Pretty much any type of school that has recording classes will be happy to let you offer your services to their students
 
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