Polyrhythms

LeJayk

New member
I've spoke to a tutor at college about them, who also acts an occasional theory. I can't seem to get my head around them at all though. Been listening to Meshuggah alot on my tutors advice to try and understand through music instead of words, but it just confuses me more. I know Tomas Haake uses alot of manipulation of bars, which may or may not be the same thing. Its just a complete blank area for me =[

Anyone wanna try and explain it in laymans terms? Also, how would you go about practicing to actually play them?
 

SHOGUNWARRIOR32

New member
LeJayk":3e8w9t74 said:
I've spoke to a tutor at college about them, who also acts an occasional theory. I can't seem to get my head around them at all though. Been listening to Meshuggah alot on my tutors advice to try and understand through music instead of words, but it just confuses me more. I know Tomas Haake uses alot of manipulation of bars, which may or may not be the same thing. Its just a complete blank area for me =[

Anyone wanna try and explain it in laymans terms? Also, how would you go about practicing to actually play them?
Can you repeat the part of the stuff that talks all about the things?





Shogun
 

LeJayk

New member
You know..the things? :)

Ok. Sorry for the waffle. Drummer trait ;)

Polyrhythms. Someone to explain them. In a way that doesnt make my head hurt. A youtube video would help even better. Something.

The things?
 

christopherabruce

New member
I've worked through Peter Magadini's Musician's Guide to Polyrhythms, available at petermagadini.com/ . It's best to have an experienced teacher work through it with you.

Manipulation of bars sounds more like polymetric modulation, and is covered in Jack DeJohnette's The Art of Modern Drumming- jackdejohnette.com/pop_up/artofmod.html .

Hope this helps.

Christopher


LeJayk":q6eux9d2 said:
I've spoke to a tutor at college about them, who also acts an occasional theory. I can't seem to get my head around them at all though. Been listening to Meshuggah alot on my tutors advice to try and understand through music instead of words, but it just confuses me more. I know Tomas Haake uses alot of manipulation of bars, which may or may not be the same thing. Its just a complete blank area for me =[

Anyone wanna try and explain it in laymans terms? Also, how would you go about practicing to actually play them?
 

okjohne

New member
A good(modern) example is Giambi by Tool. The bass drum pattern follows a different "one" than the main rythem of the tune. The bass drum badabaduh badabaduh: 1st ba landing on a different beat every time until comming around and landing on one. At the same time the hands are syncing on 4/4 or 3/4 or if you're Steve Gadd 13/16. 3 on 4 is the easiest. Play 1 2 3 4 on your BD and play a simple rythem on your HH and SD in 3/4 after 4 bars of the 3/4 rythem on the SD & HH you will land back on 1 with your bass drum and you will be playing a polyrythem.

Hope that helps.

Johne
 

bapudi

New member
LeJayk":1n8xlxxi said:
I've spoke to a tutor at college about them, who also acts an occasional theory. I can't seem to get my head around them at all though. Been listening to Meshuggah alot on my tutors advice to try and understand through music instead of words, but it just confuses me more. I know Tomas Haake uses alot of manipulation of bars, which may or may not be the same thing. Its just a complete blank area for me =[

Anyone wanna try and explain it in laymans terms? Also, how would you go about practicing to actually play them?

watch any lil drum video from bill bruford.

the Polyrhythm king
 

break the prism

New member
polyrhythms are simply multiple rhythms played at once. on drums it can be counting 4 with your feet and maybe 5 with your hands. it takes some coordination.

the most elementary polyrhythm weould be the "walk the fat dog" polyrhythm of west african drumming. it's like a hemiola, but with a syncopated "3" over 2
 

B-RAD52

New member
for 3 against 2, i do
"pass the butter"
.R......R.......R
.L............L
or
.L.......L.......L
.R............R

for 4 against 3, i do
"wats da price of butter"
.R......R..........R......R
.L...........L..........L
or
.L.......L..........L.......L
.R...........R.........R

these have worked for me, and this is what my teachers taught me here. hope that helps you.
 

drumur

New member
I am not sure what you guys are referring to...
Are you talking about something like when you play a 6 over 4 like in latin music. It's like playing a double paradiddle over 4 but the groove sounds like it's in 6.

....1..2..3..4..5..6

....1....2....3....4
 

B-RAD52

New member
drumur":2d2893ld said:
I am not sure what you guys are referring to...
Are you talking about something like when you play a 6 over 4 like in latin music. It's like playing a double paradiddle over 4 but the groove sounds like it's in 6.

....1..2..3..4..5..6

....1....2....3....4
what you just put, is also 3 over 2
 

rlrrll

New member
At MI, we used to sing "Pass the butter!" to demonstrate a 3 against 2 polyrhytym. Played Flam- right - left - right.
Rhythmically, it' a dotted 8th note played with both hands on beat 1, a right on the"a of 1", a left on 2, and another right on "e" of two. Sing it -- Pass The But -ter. Works every time!

Listen to any Frank Zappa for an education in polyrhythems. Terry Bozzio's "Drums and the Ostinado' cd or video is a good one too.

TC
 

drumur

New member
Actually, I was talking about 1/8 note triplets played as a Double paradiddle with your left hand on the snare and your right hand on the bell, Hi-hat or cowbell. It ends up being 12 beats(of the 1/8 notes in triplets) per one bar of 4.
It's a pretty common latin groove of 6 against 4.
 

B-RAD52

New member
drumur":qkzluzh0 said:
Actually, I was talking about 1/8 note triplets played as a Double paradiddle with your left hand on the snare and your right hand on the bell, Hi-hat or cowbell. It ends up being 12 beats(of the 1/8 notes in triplets) per one bar of 4.
It's a pretty common latin groove of 6 against 4.
that is still just two groupings of 3 over 2
 
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