Playing different in the studio

phil-drummer

New member
ive drummed on tracks in studio a couple o times and everytime the sound dude says " right....go! " i start playing and i realise ive gotta hit every note right and i end up playin really tense and crooked and screwing up and havin to start from where i went wrong.

is there any advice that you can please hurl my way because its frustrating listen to the demos back and thinking " that part sounds really shit "
 

drumsforlife

New member
Sometimes we're our own worst critics. Try not to think about the fact that you're wanting to get every note right. That's just beating your head against a brick wall. Instead, do the take expecting to have another go at it. It should actually take stress off of you because you get no second chances whenever you play live.
 

phil-drummer

New member
drumsforlife":3vcnmu26 said:
Sometimes we're our own worst critics. Try not to think about the fact that you're wanting to get every note right. That's just beating your head against a brick wall. Instead, do the take expecting to have another go at it. It should actually take stress off of you because you get no second chances whenever you play live.
cheers man , but i think you can get away with quite a bit live, e.g. dropping a stick , breaking sticks etc. n the sound isnt as clear. but yeh keep the adivce coming
 

drumsforlife

New member
Well, I forgot to mention this earlier but I'm telling you from experience. Don't put so much emphasis on getting all the notes exactly the way YOU want them to sound. It's a futile battle. I'm not meaning to say that you can't ever get things to sound like you want, I'm just saying don't focus on that at first. The idea is to trick yourself into playing the best you can. If you're thinking about all this stuff, it will cloud up your mind. You'll get tense and the take won't be as good. I've been a recording engineer on a lot of projects, and I'm a producer/dj/board op at a radio station. I tell the folks who come in to voice track commercials for their businesses the same thing. I say, "It doesn't have to be exactly right the first time. We have all afternoon to get this." Most of the time, the first take is air-able because they don't even know I'm recording them in. They think they're practicing. It''s amazing what you can catch when somebody is oblivious to the fact that they're being recorded. Some people even enjoy themselves. And that's the main thing. You're in the studio! Enjoy yourself! I know it's money, but if you think yourself into a corner, you're going to play like that. And it's going to sound like that on your demo.
 

phil-drummer

New member
alright cool man. the main worry is stamina, i can play all my bands stuff fine its just wen live there more adenaline so i dont hav to worry bout my legs stiffin up. but i shall take all you adivse into considerating cuz its awesome, cheers man .

keep it coming tho . i wanna lern more :D
 

drumsforlife

New member
Ok. The way I usually approach tracking drums, whether I'm the drummer, or if I'm the engineer, is somewhat of a hybrid aproach. There's two ways to record. You can take a "live band" approach and have the whole band set up and record them just like they'd be playing a show. And then there's layering, where you'd have each individual member come in and record their part separately. Like I said I take a hybrid approach, which would mean that I use a mix of both methods. The first bit of the session I use the live band approach. I get tracks on all the instruments, whether or not we'll end up using them in the final mix. Then I have each individual member come in and track by themselves. That way, say the bassist hits a wrong note from the first part of the session during the live band section, he/she can "fix" that one note on playback. Sometimes during the layering session, I end up using the entire track in the final mix. Sometimes it's a hybrid of the two. It's a toss up. The main thing being I end up making them sound their best.
 

SGarrett

New member
drumsforlife":371333pn said:
Well, I forgot to mention this earlier but I'm telling you from experience. Don't put so much emphasis on getting all the notes exactly the way YOU want them to sound. It's a futile battle. I'm not meaning to say that you can't ever get things to sound like you want, I'm just saying don't focus on that at first. The idea is to trick yourself into playing the best you can. If you're thinking about all this stuff, it will cloud up your mind. You'll get tense and the take won't be as good. I've been a recording engineer on a lot of projects, and I'm a producer/dj/board op at a radio station. I tell the folks who come in to voice track commercials for their businesses the same thing. I say, "It doesn't have to be exactly right the first time. We have all afternoon to get this." Most of the time, the first take is air-able because they don't even know I'm recording them in. They think they're practicing. It''s amazing what you can catch when somebody is oblivious to the fact that they're being recorded. Some people even enjoy themselves. And that's the main thing. You're in the studio! Enjoy yourself! I know it's money, but if you think yourself into a corner, you're going to play like that. And it's going to sound like that on your demo.
Great advice. That's the exact problem I'm having right now. I reach over, hit record, and then feel the pressure to perform. I'm pretty much fine when I'm looking through glass at an engineer but there's this new kind of pressure being my own engineer. Not to threadjack but, if you have time could you take a listen to the song I posted in the Show Us Your Band forum, titled "Session Vets." and give me some honest feedback?
 

Timekeep69

New member
In my recording experience I've noticed that things that I didn't feel sounded right were missed competely by everyone else so I don't stress about it. If it's somethig that stands out, fix it. If no one notices it and it screams out to you, if you have time, fix it. If you know it wasn't what you planned but still sounds ok, move on.
 

drumsforlife

New member
Timekeep69":lmaj6kcw said:
In my recording experience I've noticed that things that I didn't feel sounded right were missed competely by everyone else so I don't stress about it. If it's somethig that stands out, fix it. If no one notices it and it screams out to you, if you have time, fix it. If you know it wasn't what you planned but still sounds ok, move on.
Exactly man! You seemed to take what I wanted to say and say it better. Nice!
 

stump

New member
Relax and remember why you are playing! To have fun and make music with your friends for people to hear and enjoy. Yes we are our own worst critics but realize that we all have our own styles and bring something to music that no one else brings and that we are not perfect. Enjoy the experience and realize that if there is a blurb or 2 that they can be fixed in a snap. You will play much better! Peace on ya!
 

dwtoast72

New member
done a good bit of recording and this is what helped me when I was having the exact issue; usually what we've done in the past was record guitar to a click, then bass, the kit, then vox. If you're doing a few of days worth of recording, then burn a rough copy of the guitar tracks. Take it home and play to it, get real comfy with it. Cause it ain't the same as playing with your bro across from you staring him right in the eye when it comes down to that 11/16 change up, or that transition area, you know what I mean? That guitar track will never change. Get up the next day for recording and knock it out; first time go (an army thing).
 

BillRayDrums

New member
You should always play like you do in the living room (or other relaxed "home base"). When I was with Ike Turner we'd do these shows with 75,000 people and that was the first thing he'd say was "Play like we do in the living room....play for ourselves, and the people will listen".

That's the best musical advice I've ever gotten.

Just go in and play like you do when no one's watching.
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Sometimes missing notes or making mistakes can be a blessing when you listen back. Whether or not they make for a bad take, they may inspire you to play something differently or not at all.
 
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