Need help to mic drums??

cgaffka

New member
Hey everyone!
I'm completely new to this mic your drums thing... Just wondering if anybody can tell me a good way to do this like what equipment I need and possibly how to set it up? Not looking for the greatest best ever sound.. just trying to get a little louder, yet not totally spend all my cash.

Thanks a lot everyone for your help I appreciate it!

-Chirs
 

Spydr2000

New member
cgaffka":26zvaw7r said:
Hey everyone!
I'm completely new to this mic your drums thing... Just wondering if anybody can tell me a good way to do this like what equipment I need and possibly how to set it up? Not looking for the greatest best ever sound.. just trying to get a little louder, yet not totally spend all my cash.

Thanks a lot everyone for your help I appreciate it!

-Chirs
Well first thing is getting the right mic's. The most common are shure 57's and a AKG bass drum mic (not sure of the model). I talked to a sound guy recently and he said Audix drum mic packs are by far great mic's.

Now getting a good sound this takes alot of know how. Mic placement is keyand EQ ing. I would get horrible over tones and my sound man would move the mic a hair and it was completely gone. I never used a true bass drum mic but I used a shure 58 1" from impact of the beater with it slightly angled. This was my soundmans doing.. but I can't complain I had one of the best sounding bass drums.

Next is noise gating... a quad gate or possibly 2 of these units are needed. These clean up all those nasty overtones that the mic picks up. This is the unit that makes the toms sound muffled with attack. The othe thing you will need is some kind of reverb unit. You want a nice sounding reverb for getting that fat sound.

This will get you started.. there are other things you can add like separate equalizers for each drum, gated compressors, over head mic's
 

devilspain

New member
hey cgaffka. first just want to know what purpose are you mic'in your kit up for?? little louder for the practising ?? playing live?? recording??.


if you practising. depends on a few things where? for a start. if its a small room im sure its loud enough. acoustics can be crap in small rooms. the bigger the place you practise the easier it is on the ears. i dont recommend mic'in up for practises unless you can't hear your bass over .. say alot cymbal noise. id get ear plugs they help you hear your sound better.

but if you really want to still mic up id say go for this. they decent quality for the price of the set.
CAD PRO-7 7-Piece Drum Microphone Pack. they get some good rap and they cheap. check out musicians friend.

If you are going into the live sound best bet would be SURE SM57's they are a dynamic microphone used for picking up dynamic sound like bangs and crashes and instruments(ps you can use it for vocals but the SM58 is more for vocals but take the spherical filter off and its practically an SM57). i would use 57 for all your toms and snare. even on the bass. like spydr2000 said the AKG D112 is a great mic, but theres nothing wrong with the sure PG52,56.
im sure spydr2000 got a lovely sound of the sm58 mic'in his bass but the microphone wasnt designed for that use id try a 57 instead. at the batter end and then a usual kick drum mic like the PG56. etc. you'll get the attack and reasonance.

or keeping it simple just get 2 really good over head condenser mics. great for a quick recording but not so cheap.

if you recording try to go to a good reliable studio and pay them cash would be easier and more professional.

untop of gettin your mics you either need an audio interface - like an Mbox 2 and a mixer of a digi 002 and a mixer or a presonus firepod which has 8 mic inputs. they more for recording yourself.

or get a cheap PA system including 2 speakers and a mixing unit with at least 4mic input - preferably 8.

thats about it. if you have any other questions feel free to ask.

oh forgot when you mic up a snare and bass drum use low to the ground mic stands not the normal vocal mics they deadly to place on the kit and can get in the way of you playing. make sure all your mics are around 1-2" from the head. so they dont vibrate so much then touch the head. for bass drum placement if the bass drum is ported then place on inside around the mid section of the drum. if unported place it about 5" from the bass drum skin. i find these give me the best results on my kit but maybe not for others. try experimenting for the sweetspot sound.

good luck.
 

trstn

New member
I have some expierience (15 years ;) ) with life engineering. I think I am one of the few people who dislike AKG D11x eggs in the basedrum. Well I'd only used them for a more 'open' miking when it comes to Jazz and other more "acustical" styles, or drummers who refuse to cut a hole in the kick's reso ...
But for the optimal kick/bassboost my combination is a SM 91 simply laid into the kick and a EVoice PL/EL 20 put just a little bit into drum at a reso hole.

As it comes to SM 57 in kicks, they are quite challanging to filter if you work with, lets say, more potent PAs. But they absolutly are the best choice for toms and snare. But also I had little chance to check out other products. One should always have an open mind, but not for AKG Dxxx mics .. :)

For overheads and hats I used the small Neumann condensor mics (forgot the name, just "get me the neumanns, please"), too expensive for a private setup for my taste. I own 2 cheap nady condensors, they do their job.

I have no real expierience with recording, but a SM58 laid into the basedrum does it for me if it comes to recording a rehearsal. I use my both condensors in a 45 degree angel in the middle of the room, one pointing to the git the other to the base, standing a meter away from my drums. So 3 mics for quite usable session recordings.

As said before you need to think about for what purpose you need your mics. I propose you go with a more cheaper approach. A SM 91 is quite expensive. I have seen quite cheap drummic sets to buy, I'd go with them.
When I need to record for demos I go to a PA company and lend some mics and a small mixerto record halflife to 8 Track HD.

HTH
first post (yay!)
trstn
 

cgaffka

New member
wow... alot more to it then i would have ever thought.. Well we practice in a very large ware house.. and im hardly over my guitarists and bass amps. Also when we do anything live.. they gotta go way down just so u can hear drums. Wed like to find a way not to have to do tht. So im basically seeing just buy the mic package and some sort of pa?
 

m

New member
trstn":pg6wjw86 said:
I have some expierience (15 years ;) ) with life engineering. I think I am one of the few people who dislike AKG D11x eggs in the basedrum.
I guess I'm the other one!
 

Mitchell_2004

New member
As of right Now I use CAD Mics.. They do the job for me anyway.. And they Are cheap, I purchased 8 mics for less than 300.. I cant comment on how they sound against AKG d112 Kick mics, or any Shure's.. Since I dont have any to try out.. :( But They will work for recording :) Just mess around with Placement, and more placement.. :)
 

The Alien Drummer

New member
First off- This is no easy, minor task. That's why bands pay the sound guys more money than they each make. It takes alot of money and know how to pull it off.

If you can't get above the guitar players volume then they need to quit being ignorant and turn down some. If it's not possible to get through their thick heads then there are other solutions. Often times I run just kick and click through my in-ears. I can hear my snare fine, just always seems to be the kick that gets lost. I use the Shure in-ears that reduce the volume of everything to a tolerable level. So for me the basic is to run the headphone output of my Roland SPD-s that my kick triggers into my clickstation and then use the headphone output of it. Live I use my own monitor feed into my in-ears and blend everything just how I want it.

As far as the PA aspect:

I used AKG D112s for 20 years with great success. I recently bought the Audix pack with the D6 kick mic and the ADX90 tom mics and they are great! I use a sennheiser e603 on the snare and keep 4 SM58s around for the just in case stuff.
I run my toms and kick through a 4 channel gate using my boards inserts. I keep the snare(s) live. My kick is triggered, but when I run sound for other people I run the kick through a 15 band EQ. I use a reverb unit for the toms and snare but keep the kick dry. All that runs through about 8000 watts of crown macrotech and crest power.

Again, probably $12,000 into my BASIC set-up. Not even close to my dream set up. The outside show we played this weekend the guy had $250,000 in his stage/lights/PA.

Hope that helps, here's the Audix link.

http://www.musiciansfriend.com/product/Audix-Custom-4Piece-Drum-Microphone-Package?sku=270642
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
I use a D-112 on my kick (I'm considering adding an SM91 and running 2 kick mics, I heard a guy doing that recently and it sounded AMAZING) an SM57 on my snare, an Audix f10 on my rack tom, audix f12 on my floor tom, and 2 audix condensers (one over the hats, the other over the ride). This setup works well in small or large clubs, but it is about $500 worth of mics. You can get a pretty decent sound with one of the Audix or CAD kits, and they cost about half that. So has anyone else heard of using a D-112 and SM91 at the same time? If so what did you think? I personally thought it brought out the BOOM a little more (maybe not so desirable in really fast metal, but in a rock setting, I liked it.)
 

The Alien Drummer

New member
In a live situation I think proper EQ could accomplish the same thing with 1 mic, as oppposed to 2.

The only downside to the AKG D112s are that after time the 4k boost starts wear off. Again this can be cured with EQ.

Don't forget to gate your kick! This will allow you a lot more headroom to play with the punch and overall sound with out having to worry about any feedback.

Another BIG point. Any mic desigend for the kick drum will give a good sound. But if you don't have a good board, processing, speakers, amplifiers or qualiy power (AC) it's still going to sound like crap out front. There are SOOOOOO many variables that it can get mind boggling! That's why a good sound man is worth the money!
 

Raider05

New member
Anyone have any experience/knowledge with Sennheiser 604 clip-on mics?

I have mics and a PA for all my drums now, but find the toms mics to be a pain with their size etc. It means I have to place some of my cymbals higher in the air than I would like, in order to clear the mics and cables over the toms.

I recently played a club and the house sound guy used the Sennheiser 604 clip-on's on the toms, and they worked great. As a result, I'm thinking about getting some. Any input?

http://www.sweetwater.com/store/detail/E604/
 

The Alien Drummer

New member
I use the 603s, they're basically the same, but I only use it on my snare(s). My toms I use the TINY audix ones listed in the link in my post above. You can't even see them off stage! And they're very affordable.
 

screamkevin

New member
I agree with Alien, tell your guitarists and bassist to turn down.

Personally, I use a Shure Beta 52, which is the industry standard, on my kicks, and Shure Beta 56s on my snare and toms. Great mics, and not nearly as intrusive as SM-57s. (That's always been the one complaint I had about 57s, you can't get them out of the way.)
 
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