Need help teaching students....

bbhuang

New member
I'm a Drum Instructor at a place called Kuching, Sarawak, Malaysia. in Asia

I have around 10+ students under me.

I think every one can play any standard beat in 30 minutes if i were to teach them how 2 drum......
But for me the hard thing is 2 teach them to follow a certain tempo or beat there are suppose 2 follow.....

normally they take around 4-8 lessons trying 2 follow the tempo o midi player that i use that give out a metronome
sound with the correct electrical tempo base on beat.

teach me how 2 over come this problem.

P.s. the thing is a lot of students stopped because of this that is around 3 out of 10.
 

trstn

New member
I let my students (1 for drums and a lot for guitar) play the beat or riff in a steady tempo and asked them stupid things about the food they ate, how's the school going and such. When I recognized that they are not disturbed by my questions and could have a conversation while playing I increased the tempo a bit until they need to concentrate on it again and start over.
After a few times I made this step by step increasing without any talking, I increased the tempo only when I saw that the student is able to play it. If it came to a "nearly too fast" tempo I encouraged to concentrate and not to stop for a bit longer. Counting out load is a good method to "force" concentration. How long these "concentration" phases are is up to the student, everyone is different. Be sure to have a relax period after concentration.

HTH
trstn
 

SGarrett

New member
I have my students play along with me. That way they can feel exactly where everything's supposed to fit and when they're not quite getting it. I ask all of them to buy even a cheap metronome and from that point it's their responsibility to work with it. I'm an extremely supportive teacher who gives loads of positive re-enforcement but I don't pamper people and I expect them to hold up their end of the bargain. I teach, they learn. If they don't want to learn they're wasting my time, their time, and either their money or their parent's money. Concentrate on the students who are eager to learn and simply replace the ones who aren't. You'll drive yourself crazy if you try to keep every student who walks through your doors. Once you start getting quality students out there, people will ask where they learned how to play and you get more new students.
 

rlrrll

New member
Make sure your students have a good understanding of what a quarter note pulse is, how it works and how to find it. It's like learning any language; if they don't get the first step,they'll struggle forever.

Try playing 8ths and 16th and have them find the 1/4 pulse. Just have them tap their sticks while you play. Then switch it up -- you play 1/4's and have them play 8th's. Once the light bulb goes off in their head, they'll have it for good.

Also, have them play along with songs that have an OBVIOUS 1/4 PULSE. "Kashmir"by Led Zeppelin, or anything by the White Stripes. Something medium tempo and easy. DON"T PLAY ALONG WITH THEM OR THEY WILL JUST FOLLOW YOU!! You won't be at there house after the lesson to guide them, so they have to get it on there own.

If possible, have them play to a song that does not have drums. Make them follow the voice or the main riff. "We're Gonna Be Friends" by the White Stripes or "That's the Way" by Zeppelin are good for this. Both are acoustic songs and are nice and slow.
"Jane Says" by Jane's Addiction is another good one.

Also, make them count "1,2,3,4" OUT LOUD!!! This is a must! They may feel crazy talking out loud, but it's the only way to internalize the pulse!

It's your job to make sure they understand this. It will make the rest of our lesson's easier.

Good luck,


RLRRLL
 

rlrrll

New member
SGarrett said:
I have my students play along with me. That way they can feel exactly where everything's supposed to fit and when they're not quite getting it. I ask all of them to buy even a cheap metronome and from that point it's their responsibility to work with it. I'm an extremely supportive teacher who gives loads of positive re-enforcement but I don't pamper people and I expect them to hold up their end of the bargain. I teach, they learn. If they don't want to learn they're wasting my time, their time, and either their money or their parent's money. Concentrate on the students who are eager to learn and simply replace the ones who aren't. You'll drive yourself crazy if you try to keep every student who walks through your doors. Once you start getting quality students out there, people will ask where they learned how to play and you get more new students.
Um, so your suggestion is to quit teaching the kid's who can't keep time with a CD right away? Forgive me if I'm wrong, but isn't that way they came to you -- to learn how to play music? If they can't play in time, shouldn't you, oh, I don't know, HELP THEM?
It's not like your teaching a college class with pre-requisites. "Not through with Time Keeping 101! Out of my class until you've done the prep work!!!!"

:roll:

"I teach, they learn" CLASSIC!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

SGarrett

New member
rlrrll":3r9jvo7o said:
SGarrett":3r9jvo7o said:
I have my students play along with me. That way they can feel exactly where everything's supposed to fit and when they're not quite getting it. I ask all of them to buy even a cheap metronome and from that point it's their responsibility to work with it. I'm an extremely supportive teacher who gives loads of positive re-enforcement but I don't pamper people and I expect them to hold up their end of the bargain. I teach, they learn. If they don't want to learn they're wasting my time, their time, and either their money or their parent's money. Concentrate on the students who are eager to learn and simply replace the ones who aren't. You'll drive yourself crazy if you try to keep every student who walks through your doors. Once you start getting quality students out there, people will ask where they learned how to play and you get more new students.
Um, so your suggestion is to quit teaching the kid's who can't keep time with a CD right away? Forgive me if I'm wrong, but isn't that way they came to you -- to learn how to play music? If they can't play in time, shouldn't you, oh, I don't know, HELP THEM?
It's not like your teaching a college class with pre-requisites. "Not through with Time Keeping 101! Out of my class until you've done the prep work!!!!"

:roll:

"I teach, they learn" CLASSIC!!!!!!!!!!!!
That's not what I said at all. Not even remotely.

What I said was, I replace them if they don't want to learn. You know, the people who never do their homework, constantly need to work on the same lessons during class time so they're not learning anything new, don't ever challenge themselves, frequently canceling lessons to do something else, etc.. I try to find what works for those people, try talking to them, try to find something to get them interested but at some point some people just aren't serious enough to want to progress. I'm not a babysitter and I have enough personal integrity to not take their or their parent's money at that point.

And yes, I understand fully well that people progress at different rates. Not what I'm talking about. Again, I'm talking about the people who just don't want to progress. So yes. I teach, they learn. That's the deal. Oddly enough all of my teachers, including my martial arts instructors, use that philosophy with remarkable success.
 

rlrrll

New member
bbhuang's post plainly stated a direct question: "How do I teach timekeeping"? He never mentioned anything about kids who don't practice, don't want to learn or wasting time. SGarrett added all of that to the conversation. Granted, SGarrett's points are all fair points, but they belong in a thread about "problem students".

Beyond that, I do agree with SGarrett about the need to cut bait on "babysitty" students. I've had enough of those too. Strangely, most of them come from Korean or Chinese families, where the parent has chosen to get the kid into music lessons without asking the kid! they ask the kid what they want to play and they either say "drums" or "guitar". They just show up like it's another class at school and try to work as little as possible.

Now, it's different with younger children or disabled students. Kids under 7 are not going to progress as fast as teens, but they can have fun and learn well enough to play. There are books and curriculum for them (KinderMusic).

I have one student who is autistic. He learns very, very slowly -- but I do see him getting something out of it and after 6 lessons so far he is picking up some of the stuff -- yet I know he will never be able to play a groove on a full kit. He does have fun playing and thats whats its really all about anyway.
 
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