My Epiphany

VR4Drummer

New member
so, about four months ago I found myself on a plateau, a place where I felt like I had hit a wall, and where my drumming wasn't progressing the way I wanted it to anymore. I was listening to my favorite bands (Saosin, Thrice, Thursday) and trying to figure out what it is that separates those drummers from myself, and than it hit me like a brick...CONTROL. I realized that I couldn't do single stroke roll fills. dropped double and quadruples, and double bass fills as fast or clean as those guys. So I literally put down all my books and practiced nothing but single stroke rolls with marching sticks, dropped double and quadruple fill combinations, and double bass control exercises and nothing else. I worked on nothing but my control, and I didn't even play my drums for three months straight, I just played on my practice pad (sitting on top of my snare) and my double bass pedal attached to my Gibraltar kick practice pad with a metronome of course. I also bought and started using my NSD Powerball like every nite...and I COMPLETELY BROKE THROUGH MY WALL. I don't even sound like the same drummer...I was busy trying to learn all of this technique and doing all of these rudiment exercises and I was completely ignoring what I now think is the most important part of rock drumming...stick control and foot control. You can try to play the most advanced, syncopated, off time beat, but everything is going to sound like sh*t if the control isn't there. Everything I play sounds so much cleaner now and I can do Alex Rodriguez single stroke roll fills hit for hit. I just was wondering if anyone else has had any epiphanies like this that have really gotten them through a stale period in their drumming, because I would love to hear about it.
 

Rockula!

New member
Throughout he 90's, I was convinced that I could get a band together with me as a front man
I can play a decent guitar and can sing so I thought I'd get out front
It failed miserably
My biggest problem was finding a drummer because most were not able to play the parts I had written
The ones who were good enough seemed to be in several bands at once and couldn't give me the time of day
Then I switched back to the drums
The band I formed in 2000 was THE band that I was going to finally "make it" with
Well, the bass player got married, bought a house and refused to tour
I came back to Texas in '05 and have been trying to get my self together
That's when a friend of mine suggested that, since I can write all of my own material then why not truly go solo

I had no idea how to accomplish this task until he showed me the Rolands SPDS
Next thing I know, I am able to have the complete band and the only person I have to worry aboout is me

Once I started thinking in the directions that the SPDS afforded me, I became completely liberated
The music that I thought as kinda cool all of the sudden became amazing
Partly because I had complete control and partly because of the novel approach to prformance
Now there are no limits to what I can imagine, just limitations on how I can perform it
Yea, I have heard quite a few comments about it being a "novelty act" but then again I love novelty acts

After 20 years of looking to "male it" as a huge rich rock star, I have realised that I'm more interested in doing things my way than allowing others to slow me down or hold me back (as well as my own un-realistic expectation of other musicians)

It all happened when my friend turned me on to one piece of equipment
 

FelterSkelter

New member
Rockula!":tglhk527 said:
Throughout he 90's, I was convinced that I could get a band together with me as a front man
I can play a decent guitar and can sing so I thought I'd get out front
It failed miserably
My biggest problem was finding a drummer because most were not able to play the parts I had written
The ones who were good enough seemed to be in several bands at once and couldn't give me the time of day
Then I switched back to the drums
The band I formed in 2000 was THE band that I was going to finally "make it" with
Well, the bass player got married, bought a house and refused to tour
I came back to Texas in '05 and have been trying to get my self together
That's when a friend of mine suggested that, since I can write all of my own material then why not truly go solo

I had no idea how to accomplish this task until he showed me the Rolands SPDS
Next thing I know, I am able to have the complete band and the only person I have to worry aboout is me

Once I started thinking in the directions that the SPDS afforded me, I became completely liberated
The music that I thought as kinda cool all of the sudden became amazing
Partly because I had complete control and partly because of the novel approach to prformance
Now there are no limits to what I can imagine, just limitations on how I can perform it
Yea, I have heard quite a few comments about it being a "novelty act" but then again I love novelty acts

After 20 years of looking to "male it" as a huge rich rock star, I have realised that I'm more interested in doing things my way than allowing others to slow me down or hold me back (as well as my own un-realistic expectation of other musicians)

It all happened when my friend turned me on to one piece of equipment
Rock on with your bad self Rockula! I must say I love the age I'm living in, where the possibilities and accessabilities for solo recording are infinite. I am part of a solid rhythm section, however, getting a band going is a lot of work. After several trial runs at that approach, we realized we had all the means to make the recordings ourselves and play all the instruments..... Plus it's easier to make decisions with two people rather than three or four.
 

Damagedrummer

New member
I had an eye-opener too awhile ago...I'm always thinking ahead when it comes to drumming. My mind is far ahead of my body. Like I hear all these great bands and want to play the same things, but my body just can't handle it, due lack of technique, speed or experience or whatever. That sometimes pisses my off very much to the point, where I let it all go and just stop practising and just go play with my fav rocktunes or whatever just to blow off steam. That's when I came to realise that I will never become the drummer that I want to be, because their will always be better drummers, and I will always be pissed about the things I can't play. But at such moments it's good to look back and see what you've accomplished and how much better you've became. And be proud of it. Then I get all reloaded and ready to go practise some shit I can't play without getting mad :p But every time I get mad because of such things I remember that it's all about the fun, and that I love playing drums. That for me helped alot, and it's just all about the whole spirit of playing the instrument and becoming one with the music. That's more important than any technique to me..
 
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