most durable snare heads

Karl Fabricius

New member
Hi. I'm basically seeking the most durable snare head out there as the ones i've been using (most recently evans hydraulics) never seem to make it thru more than one pracrice session. Remo Emperor X's claim to be super hard wearing but what about the remo black max ebony? I just want one that'll last never mind about sound. Didn't Evans used to do a super hard wearing one, aramid fibre? Any guidance greatly appreciated.
 

LadyThunder

New member
I'm an extremely hard hitter, especially on my snare, and am constantly on the search for the most durable snare head. My favorites that i've used are the Aquarian High Energy as well as the Remo Powerstroke 3. The High Energy will definately give you the durability you're looking for hands down, but you get a lot of high-pitched overtones on a steel or brass snare (fyi - haven't tried this head on the maple snare yet). Just slap a moon gel on there and it takes care of the problem, also depends on the tone you're trying to get out of it, and tuning preferences, etc.

As far as the Powerstroke 3 goes, they don't last as long, but I am about to try out the Powerstroke 4 which is a 2-ply version of the 3. I love the deep dry puchy tone I get out of the Powerstroke 3 though just not the durability. I'll have to make another post once I try out the 4 and let you know...

happy skin huntin'.....
 
hey man...well im using a Remo coated Ambassador with the heavy hitter dot in the middle?.....man its lasted sooo dman long....and im in a metal band...so u can imagine how hard i hit...lol...trust me on this one


-Greg


Tama,Sabian,DW pedals,Remo,Aquarian Super Kick II
 

PaulZILLA

New member
Aquarian are the stuff. the High Energy rules. especialy on maple snares. and birch for that matter. almosst as good on ash. metal ring. but the Aquarian Powerhouse Kevlar is super strong. super good soundingafterall it IS kevlar. the same stuff they make bulletproof vests from
 
Lets see...
all of the mentioned heads are durable...
as far as sound goes, those clear heads that have been mentioned, sound like a cardboard box, think recording from the seventies....
but, what i want to ask is, if your head is only lasting one practice....are you getting dents in the head?
this used to happen to me, but, what it is....is not seating the head properly, and, i always (TRY) to do any head changes the night before, tune it a little tighter than you would play it, than, let it sit.....this should make a big difference on your heads life...
 

Brazilian Drummer

New member
Karl Fabricius":1ctvzdl7 said:
Hi. I'm basically seeking the most durable snare head out there as the ones i've been using (most recently evans hydraulics) never seem to make it thru more than one pracrice session. Remo Emperor X's claim to be super hard wearing but what about the remo black max ebony? I just want one that'll last never mind about sound. Didn't Evans used to do a super hard wearing one, aramid fibre? Any guidance greatly appreciated.
the black max is a marching snare head, that one for shure will last you way more than the others.. the flam head will last even longer and you can get it coated... the problem is that the head is realy thick and sound lip crap if you play with drumset sticks, and you might not get a good tention on the head using a conventional snare. there are soem people that use teh falam snareside heads as a batter head on the snares.. like chad sexton from 311, and I use it sometimes to on my stell snare, but they dont last long if you are a heavy hitter.


now your problem with heads not lasting might not be just the heads fould.. it can be the way you are tuning them, bent rims or bad berin edges on your snare
 

amontholdDrums

New member
hmm.. well to be honest.. you cant be a really great drummer with out worrying about the sound.. its not respectable.. if your drums sound like shit.. no one will listen.

i recommend learning proper tuning techniques and proper hitting techniques.. you dont have to go all nerdy about it.. but study it enough that you sound good and you can play much much longer.. hitting hard is cool. but its a waste of money and energy when you can do the same thing by just learning proper technique.. thats my say
 

RogersDrummer

New member
If you want an extreamly durable snare head, i suggest the Remo Fiberskyn FA Batter. Very durable, and it produces a nice warm natural sound
 

mlumpkin13

New member
I prefer the Remo Ambassador Coated heads on my snare. I hit hard and I play alot of shows and got through about 2 a year, and they sound good all the way up until they break.
 

mikelvan

New member
In my experience the remo powerstroke 3 and pinstrip are the most durable.. however in my early years of playing i would damage heads more often. over the last 10 years i can use a single ply head and apply the same force needed to get the sound i am looking for and not damage the heads. they will last for months.

i believe the key to making heads last is in the wrists...
 

Multibomber

New member
I just don't like changing heads often and I can get a Hydrp to last 6 months on my snare and sound as good as the day I got it. It gives your snare a nice, compressed sound.
 

The Heel

New member
I've used the Evans Genera HD Dry Snare Batter Drumhead for a few years and havent really had problems breaking my snare head.

Sure you could get a kevlar head... but if you need to get a kevlar head just to avoid breaking heads... you're doing something wrong.
 

golfchance

New member
I would say it could be your technique. Do you have the snare tilted toward you too much? If so, you're essentially "stabbing" it every time you hit it, so of course it will break quickly. Try flattening the drum out a bit so a larger portion of the stick tip is coming into contact with the head.

If you're hitting really hard just for the sake of getting more volume, then try using rim shots (if you aren't already). The sound will be naturally louder. And rim shots will be easier to do with the drum in a flatter position.
 

JohnRobMHIM

New member
Yeah, I think it's got to be your tuning or your technique, because I play with a lot of drummers that hit VERY hard (I tour in a hardcore/metal band) and I've never seen or heard of a drummer going through heads as quickly as you apparently do. I go through cymbals like it's nothing, but that IS because of my technique. (although it doesn't look cool if you play with correct cymbal technique =p)

Kevlar heads are durable, but they sound like crap if you don't tune them high, and if you tune them too high you can break your drum =O (I used to march, I've seen it happen)
 

dougthedrummer

New member
snare heads only lasting 1 practice?..what are you playing with an axe?To me it sounds like bad technique,or.I know some pretty hard hitters and there heads last at least a few shows.
 
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