moon gel on snare in recording

phil-drummer

New member
will this make my snare sound quiet and timid wen recorded in a studio ? would it be better if i took it off all together,

soem help would be apreciated
 

m

New member
no, it won't do that. They dampen the ring and overtones, so it'll sound drier and more crisp, but not dead or quiet.
Still, you may want to experiment and hone your tones during the recording process, so you should definitely try different things.

I see in your pics you have 4 moongels rather far from the edge on your snare.
Maybe start with one, if you have to have any at all, and position it closer to the edge. See how you like that tone. I've recorded recently with one moongel, half hanging over the hoop so that only a portion of it was barely touching the edge of the head. That was for a snare with a very pronounced ring. Otherwise, you may not need them at all.

Where are you recording? A decent engineer will probably want to give a little advice or will at least voice his opinion while prepping your kit for the sessions.
 

phil-drummer

New member
im recording at my college studio , it wont be any thing special and will have the traditional demo low budget sound. but cheers for advice , i will be sure to experiment with my moon gel placing
 

MikeRowland

New member
Moongel is great in certain situations. You should consider a few things, though. How many mics will you have capturing the snare sound, including overheads? Overhead mics will help you with the body of the sound, whereas your snare mic picks up mostly attack, so you will capture some ring there. My guess is that if you are recording on a budget, you will not have overheads, so you may need to adjust the dampening of your drum. You should also determine if the 'ring' is coming from the head or the shell. A drum's natural overtones generally disappear in a mix, but a tuning issue certainly should be addressed. I have discovered that most head doctoring is a result of a tuning issue. However, there are cases where some sort of dampening is required. My suggestion: after miking the drums, record them for a minute or so with a guitarist playing a scratch part, then see if the ringing cuts through. Then, as stated above, start small, toward the edge or the head, as that is where the overtones come from. Good luck.
 

manicdrums

New member
We don' need no stinkin' dampin'!
But seriously, I try to use a minimum of actual damping. While I find Moongel very useful for finding and eradicating overtones on toms, I am not a huge fan of it on snare.

I normally cut a small (3") strip of an old drum head, and tape one to the edge, just to 'tame' any overtones. if you use a small piece of tape at each end of the strip, then tape it as close to the hoop as possible, in a place where you don't actually HIT the drum, it should control the tones without killing the drum.
 

LadyThunder

New member
I use them on my snare for recording. I usually use one or two halfway between the rim and the head. Of course my shell is 6.5 x 14 Brass so I use these to get rid of the massive ringing. This didn't deaden the snare though, it was still very much alive. I always make sure to use just enough to get rid of the ring, but not the presence. There's a fine line between the two, and finding it makes me happy :D . Mic placement was top and bottom of snare as well as overheads. Moongels rock my world...
 

RSmith

New member
Moongels do help on my recordings. With a DW Snare, before moongels, it sounded very loud with a bit of a ring, it sounded like I was pounding on the china cymbal. So I added one strip of Moongel to the edge of the snare and the ringing was cut down. I also add about two of them on the tom toms and they do make the drums sound much better.
 

anavrinIV

New member
i use one moongel on my snare and it cuts down all of the ring that i have, unless im playing some funk in which case i just let it ring. i hate moongels on toms because everytime ive played another guys kit live (except for the last time) it had moongels on all the toms and the sound didnt come through in the video i took. and as much time as it takes me to get my toms to resonate perfectly, im not going to mask that with muffling.
 

lowdrummer

New member
I jus got out of the studio and I used a moon gel on my snare, it didnt weaken the sound or anything, it just takes that little high pitched ring at the end of each hit out, not all the ring just that little bit.
 

skitch

New member
m":7wd8jo7w said:
no, it won't do that. They dampen the ring and overtones, so it'll sound drier and more crisp, but not dead or quiet.
Still, you may want to experiment and hone your tones during the recording process, so you should definitely try different things.

I see in your pics you have 4 moongels rather far from the edge on your snare.
Maybe start with one, if you have to have any at all, and position it closer to the edge. See how you like that tone. I've recorded recently with one moongel, half hanging over the hoop so that only a portion of it was barely touching the edge of the head. That was for a snare with a very pronounced ring. Otherwise, you may not need them at all.

Where are you recording? A decent engineer will probably want to give a little advice or will at least voice his opinion while prepping your kit for the sessions.
I second this as most drummers who don't have alot of studio experience can't beleive how their drums sound processed once everything else is completed. That little bit of ring you hear may be what makes the snare drum shine on that track! And it is difficultm though, not impossible to add that ambience back once it is removed.

Mike

http://www.mikemccraw.com
http://www.dominoretroplate.com

http://www.youtube.com/drummermikemccraw
http://www.myspace.com/drummermikemccraw
 
Top