Metronome....

danne87

New member
hey folks.

My band is going to record a song for a tribute CD to the finnish punk band Zlaskhinx soon.
My concern is if I should play with a metronome or not. I've never used a metronome for recordning before and everything has worked out well before. But last time we recorded I kinda screwed up a song and we heard it first when we started recordning bass guitar (untight rolls speeded the song up and it sounded stupid).

When I play with a metronome I always loose the beat somewhere. So recording with a metronome would take some serious time (cost alot of money). While playing without isn't as tight and is risky.

Though this song we will do is 2min long and d-beat all the way hehe :p I just felt like vent out my dissapointment towards myself when it comes to practice with metronome. What do you think? Metronome = a must for production or an overrated thing that takes away the natural live feeling?

laters
 
You should use a metrenome when you record but also find out if you and your bass player can record at the same time. Or at least have you record and have your bass player play.
 

Kris

New member
So let me see if I got this straight...your going to record a punk tribute album and your worried about a click. I think the whole idea of punk was to buck the system and coloring out side the lines...I think if you play by the rules on this one you might lose the ansgt animosity and raw live feeling that is supposed to be there...not saying that it can't be done, but should it be done?
Some things you need to step outside the box on and I think that this is one of them in order to do justice to the style. Roll with the scratch tracks on the bass/guitar and let it fly man....play the feel!
 

Quinn

New member
Great recordings have been made and are still being made without a click track. Also, as Kris points out, Punk would seem to be the genre where DIY and giving the middle finger to established industry practices is most appropriate! I agree with him - do it without the click.

However, if you want to become a better drummer, I highly recommend you start practicing with a click regularly. The decision not to use a click should be an artistic decision and not a decision that is forced on you because your sense of time is too erratic to stay with it.

Anyway, good luck on the recording!
 

SGarrett

New member
Save some serious frustration and never try to track with a click unless you're already used to practicing with one.
 

Alan_

New member
I've recently been doing the same songs with and without a click in the band project we've been recording for far too long. it's been the longest recording process EVER, but I really don't mind, as we've been using our album as the guinea pig to get the studio flawless. the weird thing is that there's really not too much difference between the click and the nonclick recordings as far as the drums go, but the guitar and bass sound MUCH more fluid and relaxed on the faster songs when there's no click track and MUCH more together on the slower ones when there is.

but hell, you're covering a punk song, right? you don't want it to sound like someone could have programmed it on a drum machine. years of listening to machines have made everyone super paranoid about the tempo budging even a millimeter, but sometimes I think it really makes a song when some sections are a hair more "up" or "down" than others. it's all about having the self-awareness to know when it's happening. If I were you, I'd practice with a metronome a bunch before ever heading to the studio, and then let things take their course without one in the studio. or, as I said above, track it with AND without the click and see which one feels and sounds better to everyone.
 

dedrummervanrolf

New member
what alan and scott said man! Don't record with a click unless you're totally comfortable with it and NEED to have a supersteady pace throughout the song.

I usually record with a click, though not to control the space between every note I play, but to keep the same tempo throughout the song. The play in space between every note is what makes it sound like a human being instead of a computer.
 

danne87

New member
Thanks for the great replies guys! All of them are good.

I totally forgot to mention that we are recording this tribute song AND 3 of our own new songs. These new songs have the same tempo through them all, and therefor I'm afraid I will do like last time I mentioned: Think that it sounds good, but later when we are recording guitars we hear that it's impossible to make it sound good with other instruments than drums hehe. We are only doing drums in the studio not bass(we record guitars at home in our own studio).

cheers
 

titaniumSS

New member
I use metronome on all my recordings. Didn't the first time, then tried it out for the first time and it just "clicked" with me lol yes it was a pun but also I picked it up quickly. I demand metronome for my recordings now, just because I'm OCD with drums and NEED to have it to make sure everything is perfectly in time. I'm good with time but I want everything absolutely flawless.
 

SGarrett

New member
I get paid to replace drum tracks that are flawless...programmed drums. :)

Humans should have slight fluctuations in their timing. That's what gives music it's life. Good meter is extremely important, but don't get carried away to perfectionist levels with it. :)
 

randomdrum

New member
It's not a must - maybe practice with one so you know you're staying in the right sort of tempo, but record without to allow for those 'human' nuances in playing. If you want to record punk you should avoid clicks unless totally necessary, in my opinion, because punk music is all about the energy, and recording to click can take that away.
 

titaniumSS

New member
SGarrett":2z4vpf8v said:
I get paid to replace drum tracks that are flawless...programmed drums. :)

Humans should have slight fluctuations in their timing. That's what gives music it's life. Good meter is extremely important, but don't get carried away to perfectionist levels with it. :)

You're just worried you won't have a job anymore :lol: not but I try and get them as perfect as possible but it's human nature to have a little error. We use triggers and drumagog and manual input to adjust things according to the metronome on the track.
 

danne87

New member
The recording went very well. I counted the songs in with a click and then continued without. I played really tight and with just a slight tempo change here and there.

Songs will be up in a month maybe. cheers
 

eml

New member
Cool! The former members of the Zlaskhinks live/lived not far from where I live! :) Perhaps you know Norppa (singer)?
 

danne87

New member
Haha cool man. I don't know the guys. They just asked if we wanted to cover them and we said yes :p But we really like their music though, raw punk.
 

iminaband

New member
Hey man, I don't mean to sound like a downer here or whatever... But, as a drummer you should learn how to play to a click. You never know when the need might arise... You can still have lots of emotion and feeling when you are using a click.. When I record with one, I don't think about the timing perse... I hear the click as a groove, almost like a kick and a snare.. And use the "groove" to get in the pocket. Sounds a bit more natural.. But you should practice with a click everyonce in a while anyways to improve your overall timing... I know many pros that don't use clicks live, but they only let the tempo fluctuate a few bpm.. Knowing that the energy from the crowd may dictate how fast they play, they don't go over board. Cause sometimes, you wont feel much energy from the crowd and you will tend to play a lot slower as well.. AND if nothing else, when the band says, COME ON MAN, THAT SONG WAS WAY TOO SLOW.. You can tell them that you were on the click and watch them be like ... OH...

It's always great when the drummer is right haha....


PS another good reason to record with a click is that if anything needs to be moved or redone, the click acts like a grid in the editing and you can usually fix things with a slide of a mouse.. Much less true with a live recording...

DC
 

Rob Crisp

New member
iminaband":2nd9tucz said:
Hey man, I don't mean to sound like a downer here or whatever... But, as a drummer you should learn how to play to a click. You never know when the need might arise... You can still have lots of emotion and feeling when you are using a click.. When I record with one, I don't think about the timing perse... I hear the click as a groove, almost like a kick and a snare.. And use the "groove" to get in the pocket. Sounds a bit more natural.. But you should practice with a click everyonce in a while anyways to improve your overall timing... I know many pros that don't use clicks live, but they only let the tempo fluctuate a few bpm.. Knowing that the energy from the crowd may dictate how fast they play, they don't go over board. Cause sometimes, you wont feel much energy from the crowd and you will tend to play a lot slower as well.. AND if nothing else, when the band says, COME ON MAN, THAT SONG WAS WAY TOO SLOW.. You can tell them that you were on the click and watch them be like ... OH...

It's always great when the drummer is right haha....


PS another good reason to record with a click is that if anything needs to be moved or redone, the click acts like a grid in the editing and you can usually fix things with a slide of a mouse.. Much less true with a live recording...

DC
You're dead right. Most studios now want you to play to a click for many reasons. For us playing with a click is essential for our sequenced parts to fit properly with the song.

Not to mention, learning to play with a click will just make you a better time keeper when you don't have one.
 

randomdrum

New member
Rob Crisp":1sx7w9bz said:
iminaband":1sx7w9bz said:
Hey man, I don't mean to sound like a downer here or whatever... But, as a drummer you should learn how to play to a click. You never know when the need might arise... You can still have lots of emotion and feeling when you are using a click.. When I record with one, I don't think about the timing perse... I hear the click as a groove, almost like a kick and a snare.. And use the "groove" to get in the pocket. Sounds a bit more natural.. But you should practice with a click everyonce in a while anyways to improve your overall timing... I know many pros that don't use clicks live, but they only let the tempo fluctuate a few bpm.. Knowing that the energy from the crowd may dictate how fast they play, they don't go over board. Cause sometimes, you wont feel much energy from the crowd and you will tend to play a lot slower as well.. AND if nothing else, when the band says, COME ON MAN, THAT SONG WAS WAY TOO SLOW.. You can tell them that you were on the click and watch them be like ... OH...

It's always great when the drummer is right haha....


PS another good reason to record with a click is that if anything needs to be moved or redone, the click acts like a grid in the editing and you can usually fix things with a slide of a mouse.. Much less true with a live recording...

DC
You're dead right. Most studios now want you to play to a click for many reasons. For us playing with a click is essential for our sequenced parts to fit properly with the song.

Not to mention, learning to play with a click will just make you a better time keeper when you don't have one.
Yeah deffo, makes you notice stuff in songs recorded without a click - I don't think it's always necessary to do but it's definitely a necessary skill if you want to be a serious drummer.
 
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