Learning on cheap or good...

Is it better to start on a cheap or good drumset?

  • Cheap

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • Expensive/ Good

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    0
  • Poll closed .

falcon.champs

New member
Is it better to start out on a good drumset that will last or start on a cheap one just to learn and then when you are better get a better one?
 

devilspain

New member
well i would say go expensive/good means you dont need to buy later. :D when you get good.

im usually a get it and then the fad wears off and dont care anymore sort of person i wanted rollar blades got them didnt use them after a week. so i asked for a drum kit my rents thot shit here goes again he'll want it we'll get and the fad will wear off. anyways they said if you still interested in a year we'll get you a kit. 1 year down i get my kit lol. great now ive got good and want a better kit. typical lol so i say if you really want a drum kit to wait a year for it and then get good. get a semi decent kit buy mid priced then you cant go wrong. you can gig with a mid priced kit. :D

now im saving for a semi pro mapex saturn and lookin forward to playing a great kit again.
 

Vetis

New member
Personally, I started playing on a really crappy set, and I am glad that I did. There were times that I had wanted to quit, so had I done so , and had bought an expensive kit, I would have been out money.

My thinking: Start cheap, go expensive if you stay with it.
 

drumobsessed

New member
I started on a cheap drumset. I recommend it because good drummers can still sound good on a cheap kit. I find it easier to sound good on a good kit and harder on a cheap kit.
 

thunderkiss65

New member
I don't think it matters much in the beginning. I learned on no kit! I played air drums for years before I got a kit and then when I finally did get one it was actually 2 really cheap kits that I bought for $50 each and put together to make a 9 piece with all the covering ripped off and spray painted black. The toms were mounted with snare drum stands and I had 1 crash 14" cymbal right in the middle of the 4 rack toms. After a couple of years my dad was able to afford to buy me a nice Remo kit like Vinnie Pauls with the big power toms. I really appreciated that kit too. I think playing on that crappy kit gave me more incentive to learn. To all the beginners out there, don't get so caught up in the image of having a nice shiney new pro level kit while you are learning. Just concentrate on learning! The industry already ruins young musicians with this whole vanity thing and most of the so-called pros out there on the modern rock scene have all the pro gear and then you go and see them live and they can't really play very well. This is more often the case than not. Nowadays you can get a pretty decent beginner kit for a few hundred dollars.
 

Shalaq

New member
If you're a beginner, you don't know what you want. You'll spend something like 3K$ on a standard high end kit and it will turn out later that this is completely different sounding from what you want to sound.
Start with a simple, quality entry level kit- maybe not one of those budget kits with crappy hardware, but still something you won't regret you buy and you'll be happy playing.
 

grimey mike

New member
devilspain":29561e2r said:
im usually a get it and then the fad wears off and dont care anymore sort of person i wanted rollar blades got them didnt use them after a week. so i asked for a drum kit my rents thot shit here goes again he'll want it we'll get and the fad will wear off. anyways they said if you still interested in a year we'll get you a kit. 1 year down i get my kit lol.
haha! thats just what happened! my parents were just like its a fad! but this the only thing i have ever stuck with! we had a well old pearl in the garage that someone gave us, so i started on that... even thought it had no snare.. or bass pedal... or hi hat! prolly the most important bits! but i just improvised and then got a ludwig rocker for a christmas present ages ago now... recently i have brought (cus i finally got a job!) and peace custom kit, which im really happy with... but i am glad i didnt start with a real good kit. i went to a carl palmer clinic a while ago and he was saying his parents brought him parts every year or so, so he started on a snare, and just played that for ages which really works cus he is amazing at snare tricks! i think work with the little you got a improvise untill you think you deserve something better!
 

loop

New member
cheap doesn't mean 'not good' so I think you should buy something inexpensive and good at the same time. As Shalaq said - an entry level kit with some good hardware and maybe some B8 cymbals will work great for you for the first year or two.
 
its best to start on a cheap kit for obvious reasons. were not all made of money!!! i see this as the parents normally do.... most kids go through a phase where they wanna be a rockstar and learn guitar or drums or w/e n expect it to all just happen in their sleep. they loose interest sooner or later n the drum kit ends up sitting there. buy a cheap one, let them prove themselves that this is what they want to do and are willing to put the time n effort into it. thats how i started. n at the beginning of this year i felt like it was obvious this was for me after 4 years of drumming and i now have a double bass custom.
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
I started on an old beat up Ludwig kit that was my Uncle's. He moved to Cali and left it for me. I used to beat on it in the garage with pens for a year before my parents finally bought me sticks.

When I started taking private lessons in Jr. High, My parents helped me get a used Pearl kit; nothing fantastic, but in much better shape than my old kit, and it was a 5 piece. I remember my renewed enthusiasm when I started playing on the "nice new" kit. Kept that through high school and college.

When I got outta college, I bought a vintage Premier that was my main kit for a while. I gigged regularly with it with various jazz and bluegrass projects. I started playing with a reggae band and then we started playing a ton, so I bought a Gretsch Renown Maple that is very nice and sounds great, but it didn't cost a ton of money.

What I'm saying is, the kits I used were out of necessity and financial standing. If you're new to drumming, and you think purchasing a nice kit right of the bat will help keep you motivated, then go for it, but I don't think it's a necessity. Just my $0.02. Thanks.
 

devilspain

New member
btw the way im not saying start off buy a top line kit. im just sayin if you think its fad go with a cheaper option but there's many budget ranged kits out there for about $500 or about £300 which would be easier to tune and sound alot better than a total beginners kit. no one agree?? buy a mid priced budget kit you'll get more than yuor moneys worth.
 

zen_drummer

New member
Things sure have changed since I was a kid in the 1960's!

Back then, the difference between entry level kits and pro kits was HUGE! The entry level brands were made by companies with names like Whitehall, Tempo, Audition, Norma, Kent and Silvertone. The stuff was really awful with thin luan mahogany shells and really rough pine reinforcement rings with bearing edges that could give you splinters!

The Pro Kits were from Rogers, Slingerland, Ludwig, Gretsch & Camco. That was all you could get!

A 5 Piece entry level kit was 199.00 bucks and a Pro Level Kit was $499.00.

Now, here's the interesting part... An entry level kit today is 300 bucks at Guitar Center and it KILLS the stuff we learned on! (although, I admit the new entry kits are nowhere NEAR as good as the mid pricepoint stuff in quality)

So, If you're just getting started... Spend 300 bucks on an entry level kit, 1000 bucks on lessons (20 bucks a week for a year), and see where you're at!

I will bet you that if we took two absolute beginners that have the real desire to play yet have never played at all, and we give one of the players a 1300 mid level kit, and give the other player a 300 dollar kit and lessons for a year, we'll end up with the player that took the lessons being the better drummer in a year. So the real question is... how badly do you want to play, and how good would you like to be? Money doesn't grow on trees, and if you're just getting started, lessons will do you more noticable good than better drums.

I've had LOTS of drum kits in my life, but the dollars my parents spent on lessons have been of value every time I sit down at the kit. Your first drum kit, no matter how good it is, is an expense. Lessons are an investment . They offer a benefit that will pay dividends for the rest of your life!

My advice? Buy a used kit, buy entry level or borrow a kit from a friend that has quit playing... Spend the money you save on lessons.
 

RSmith

New member
Well, I started out on coffee cans myself. My folks would do everything NOT to buy a drumset, one year they got me a beat up 67 Ford LTD but I still pounded on the Folgers till finally I did managed to save up a few hundred dollars and ended up getting a clear blue Zickos set for 300 bucks and then added cymbals later.

I did self taught myself playing drums by listening to the masters of rock, but looking back taking lessons and learning to read music probaly would have made me a better drummer today. But back in our heyday of the 80s, I certainly blaze the whole stage today with a wild drumming style drumming.

Either with a cheap drums or expensive drumset it depends on the drummer himself to make it sound better or worse. I had a beginner's Yamaha that held up quite well in the 15 years that I had it. My latest A DW set, certainly sounds the best out of all the drumsets I had.
 

quikstang2

New member
I'd say start with a lower range kit. You can get low end stuff that will last and sound good.

I started with school equiment and my first set was used (turns out it's really rare vintage Premier stuff) and I didn't even know there were "good" and "bad" drums back then.

All in all, I'd say if you're looking to get into it, talk to drummers who have been playing for a while, who understand the fincancial situation and who understand that you may quit in a year or so....and who aren't obligated to push the drums they're sponsored by.
 

deep-illusions

New member
Well when I started playin in Mexico, I played on a rather good set made by Pearl.
Then moved to CA and had to change to a very cheap set. The sound quality was really abvoious however it did serve its purpose of practice...now what i've done (since I dont have as much money) I buy individually and upgrade my own set. I find it better since I get the sound I want with the quality I want.
If you are goin to have a gig though its always bttr to buy the good sets though, dont buy a cheap one that will break in the middle of a song...
 

phoenix7289

New member
I personally, say start cheap. I mainly started out with a Tama Swingstar Kit(still use), with an 18" Zildjian Planet Z Crash Ride(still use), and old Swingstar hi-hat stand with Planet Z Hi-hats that I do not have anymore.... It has been almost 4 years now that I've had the set, and I gotta say, it's good, however I have done some replacements, that are good ideas if you want to know the downside to low-quality.

Replaced my HP-10 Kick pedal with a friend's Tama Iron Cobra Jr for $25 instead of $60. ^_^ He uses a double kick DW 7000, not bad at all!

Also just for Christmas, I got a Tama Iron Cobra HH-905 Hi-hat stand, which I must say, is AWESOME, considering I was getting it to replace what used to be my friend's before I traded to him my old stand. He gave me a CODA stand and hi-hats(which I still have).

I had also gotten from him, a 16" CODA Crash, and a CODA Boom stand. The crash didn't sound amazing, nor terrible, but it met it's end when it started cracking more and more. So I replaced it and it's stand with a 16" Sabian Vault Crash and a Tama Roadpro Boom stand. Both of which work much better.

In terms of the lessons, I took about 4-5 months worth, however I dropped my teacher because he was a MAJOR monotone. So I could not stand it anymore. >.>

So yes, start big, if you keep interested, as I have and many others, THEN start adding on stuff and putting forth more cash for the really nice stuff.
 

WhiteOleander

New member
haha I believe a good drummer can sound good on any set, not just a huge expensive one.. generally id say go for something simple and affordable, yet good enough to last you a long time once you become a decent drummer, so you dont just throw it away immediately and spend another load of money on a new set
 

RetardeDrummer666

New member
i say good all the way....i started out on a bad one(CB....300$) and i regret it, becuase when i started to get ok, i relized it sounded like shit, not me, my drums...and i can't affor a new one...so get a good one to start out with...
 
I agree with everyone that said go cheap, and then when you know you're going to stick with it and you've gotten reasonably good, shell out the money on a good kit.
 

l_e_i_g_h

New member
Well said. :D

Another option for those who are agonizing whether or not to buy a kit...and which kit to buy...you can always go to the option of not buying at all....just buy what you need.

i.e.

1.) if your a beginner and want to take lessons...your might just need a practice pad and a metronome.

2.) If your already in the know and need to gig around town, maybe a snare, pedal, and some cymbals would help if you know that the venues you would be playing at would have a "house kit"

3.) Buying nice pillows for practice. :)

Anyway...those are just some. I guess it's always up to the person spending the money. Sometimes you learn your lesson (and find out that you spent too much on something that didn't evolve the way you did).

Lastly...talk to people who's (musical) opinion you trust. Remember...that kit your planning to buy may be perfect for that drummer you admire...but wouldn't be so beneficial to your playing.

Shalaq":v79gc4m9 said:
If you're a beginner, you don't know what you want. You'll spend something like 3K$ on a standard high end kit and it will turn out later that this is completely different sounding from what you want to sound.
Start with a simple, quality entry level kit- maybe not one of those budget kits with crappy hardware, but still something you won't regret you buy and you'll be happy playing.
 
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