kick pedal tension

wolfsburg6674

New member
how tight do you prefer your spring? i personally prefer as tight as possible...i know if i can feel the beater hitting my foot i can play tight triplets when i want to....also...has anyone used the dualist pedal? the one that strikes on the down stroke and the upstroke of your pedal? ive been thinkin about buyin one but its kinda like cheating...depends on how it sounds i guess...let me know
 

anavrinIV

New member
i have my springs pretty tight...i changed my pedal setup today though so im still getting used to them but ive always had the springs tight.

as for the duallist, from everything i hear you basically have to use the heel/toe technique to make the double beaters work so its not even worth it because if you can do heel/toe on a regular pedal you dont need the dualist, and if you get the dualist but cant do heel/toe its just a very expensive pedal. deal? not at all.
 

Shalaq

New member
Duallist double is a cheater pedal because it performs when the pedal board goes up. It's better to use heel toe technique or the Vruk technique with the Vruk foot plate, because it teaches you the motions of your foot and it is simply not cheating :)

As for the spring tension- I have my spring tight all the way. I use an Iron Cobra pedal and it is just a feeling that the tension on these pedals is not so big when cranked all the way. But I want to seriously work on heel down technique so I'll loosen them up.
 

anavrinIV

New member
Shalaq":2vgdbc5q said:
As for the spring tension- I have my spring tight all the way. I use an Iron Cobra pedal and it is just a feeling that the tension on these pedals is not so big when cranked all the way. But I want to seriously work on heel down technique so I'll loosen them up.
i have cobras and ive found that its much easier to do heel/toe with the spring tension all the way up, especially if youre trying to do a quick 32nd note double hit. with the springs loose you dont get the rebound needed to get the second hit, at least for my feet.
 

Qbs

New member
my springs are loose/medium-loose :)
than again I don't play any extraordinary stuff with my feet :)
 

TrunJun

New member
Ok ok ok, I had to throw in my two pennies...

The theory of spring tension is very simple. People cant just play a bass drum roll with normal techniques anymore... its rather squeamish and pathetic I think, but anyways noobies, heres the deal...

Spring tension has a lot to do with your playstyle. Playing faster (on a sloppyness level) is easier to control because the beats are at a much faster tempo. It takes more control to slow it down and get your notes correctly (bands to see demonstrating the "fast slop" bass drum - Cephalic Carnage, Summon [especially the No Thoughts from the Sky cd]). Joey Jordison (overrated yes) who is semi fast used to use a very very high tension on his Cobras in the old days and achieved decent speeds. I would assume masters such as Derek Roddy who play on Axis pedals have the tension relatively High as well. Having a higher tension can also mean less control when attempting to play lower tempo tunes. For instance, I would assume Matt McDonough's tension on his pedals are at a medium-esq tension. Morgan Rose's tension is probably not that High either.

But either way, a lot of it is just how comfortable you are with your feet. Heel-toe technique is alright, but seriously, dont resort to cheap tricks to achieve something that will sound better when you practice it up (single/double strokes on your bass drum). Take the time to screw with your drumset and dont be a panzy :p
 

prl_drmer_08

New member
As of right now I have my spring tension between loose and tight. I play fast, aggressive double bass patterns. I haven't really figured out how tight I need both springs to be to get the best rebound and speed out of the pedals. I'm going to try and crank them up when I get home tonight. From what I've read on here, everyone that plays intense 32nd patterns and things have their spring tension cranked up for the best rebound and all. If anyone can give me any kind of advise, I would greatly appreciate it. :)
 

BillRayDrums

New member
I have a very simple way to set up any DW 5000 pedal for my foot-

Spring tight as possible and beater angle thrown all the way back.

When we play the bass drum, there is usually a limit to the angle it flies back. Why have that limit? Do you limit the stick height of your hands to 45?? No, because that's where the power lies, in that secondary 45? position. Same with your bass drum foot.

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal and have some energy stored up; my foot being on the pedal will take it's angle to 45? but guess what? I have another whole realm of travel "behind" the forward motion that the beater travels in.

In other words, I use every bit of energy that is stored in that spring. As a result, I am constantly breaking springs and have to keep a good stock of extras on hand.

So....that's my whole bag on that. :)
 

anavrinIV

New member
BillRayDrums":la0mh7be said:
I have a very simple way to set up any DW 5000 pedal for my foot-

Spring tight as possible and beater angle thrown all the way back.

When we play the bass drum, there is usually a limit to the angle it flies back. Why have that limit? Do you limit the stick height of your hands to 45?? No, because that's where the power lies, in that secondary 45? position. Same with your bass drum foot.

I like to let my foot rest on the pedal and have some energy stored up; my foot being on the pedal will take it's angle to 45? but guess what? I have another whole realm of travel "behind" the forward motion that the beater travels in.

In other words, I use every bit of energy that is stored in that spring. As a result, I am constantly breaking springs and have to keep a good stock of extras on hand.

So....that's my whole bag on that. :)
i personally couldnt do that.

first off, i dont need that much power to get a good sound out of my bass drum...bruce lees one inch punch can equal a full force punch from the average person. im not saying that i play with the same amount of power but if i need an extra boost i can make it.

second, the rebound of the beater when its already that far back would kill my foot. on my old pdp pedals i couldnt adjust the beater angle and when i played doubles the beaters would pound on the top of my foot...it gets quite painful after a fairly short period of time.

but, i cant speak for the 5000 pedal. maybe it requires more than i know.
 

thefats

New member
i play with mine at about a 6 on a scale of 1-10 and ass for the heal toe thing i play heel up so i havent tryed that. i don't have any problems playing 32nd note on the kick with out a roll but thats me. for the first 8 months all i did was work on my right foot so i got some speed and force down there....
 

Shalaq

New member
prl_drmer_08":2ry7oeg5 said:
As of right now I have my spring tension between loose and tight. I play fast, aggressive double bass patterns. I haven't really figured out how tight I need both springs to be to get the best rebound and speed out of the pedals. I'm going to try and crank them up when I get home tonight. From what I've read on here, everyone that plays intense 32nd patterns and things have their spring tension cranked up for the best rebound and all. If anyone can give me any kind of advise, I would greatly appreciate it. :)
To be precise, rebound comes from the head. It is only the problem of how the pedal is designed that the springs are usefull. As it is very difficult to get your foot off the pedal instantly after the impact(thus releasingthe pressure on the pedal and allowing the rebound from the head) the spring has to drive the beater backwards. The key in foot technique is to learn to release the beater not by using the spring tension but by using the energy created when the beater strikes the head- thus mastering the free stroke on the kick.
Ideally, you should be able to play with a pedal that has no springs at all, as you would depend only on the rebound. But it extremely hard, because of the way the pedals were, are and probably will be designed in the future.
 

Rob the Drummer

New member
I like to tension my pedal medium for a couple reasons. If the pedal is too loose, obviously you don't get the rebound you want. If you have the pedal too tight, you get too much rebound.

I've had problems playing on my friends Iron cobras because he has them really tight and the length of the shaft long, so when you play, you get smacked in the shin with the back of the beater. OUCH. With proper foot technique, you should be able to play your best with a medium tension imo. You get just the right amount of transfer of power and feel. Use the Pearl Eliminators, they rock! :D
 

loop

New member
Rob the Drummer":3sw0z3ck said:
With proper foot technique, you should be able to play your best with a medium tension imo.

I think it's all personal preference. If you always play with a high spring tension you'll get used to it and gain control of the pedal :)


Rob the Drummer":3sw0z3ck said:
Use the Pearl Eliminators, they rock! :D

true 8)
 

skitch

New member
I tune my pedal sprigs to A# - just kidding! How many of you ran to grab your tuner? I would say medium loose; I prefer feel over speed!
 

matt

New member
TrunJun":2eupp73d said:
Ok ok ok, I had to throw in my two pennies...

The theory of spring tension is very simple. People cant just play a bass drum roll with normal techniques anymore... its rather squeamish and pathetic I think, but anyways noobies, heres the deal...

Spring tension has a lot to do with your playstyle. Playing faster (on a sloppyness level) is easier to control because the beats are at a much faster tempo. It takes more control to slow it down and get your notes correctly (bands to see demonstrating the "fast slop" bass drum - Cephalic Carnage, Summon [especially the No Thoughts from the Sky cd]). Joey Jordison (overrated yes) who is semi fast used to use a very very high tension on his Cobras in the old days and achieved decent speeds. I would assume masters such as Derek Roddy who play on Axis pedals have the tension relatively High as well. Having a higher tension can also mean less control when attempting to play lower tempo tunes. For instance, I would assume Matt McDonough's tension on his pedals are at a medium-esq tension. Morgan Rose's tension is probably not that High either.

But either way, a lot of it is just how comfortable you are with your feet. Heel-toe technique is alright, but seriously, dont resort to cheap tricks to achieve something that will sound better when you practice it up (single/double strokes on your bass drum). Take the time to screw with your drumset and dont be a panzy :p

psh i bet the drummer of cephalic carnage could totally pwn u :p


now back to the topic
i have mine............medium tight
i do lots of ridiculously fast bassdrum work
then like slowish beats (for death metal) like the main thrash beat slayer and cannibal corpse do
 
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