keeping time

wicked_313

New member
can someone help me with some suggestions on how to keep my timing right

i am ok during fast songs but i hav to play a really really slow song for my school and i cant keep the timing even

help anybody :?
 

m

New member
many drummers find 'pumping' their hi-hat leg (without actually opening/closing the pedal- if you don't want it to sound) helps them 'count' or feel the time even when they're not playing notes. If your notes are spaced out pretty far from each other (as in a very slow tempo) you could pump your leg to smaller note divisions, so that you're keeping track of your own timing.

For example, if you're playing quarter notes on the cymbal to keep time, you could tap/pump your leg to eighth or sixteenth note intervals, depending on how slow the tempo is. Just keep the ball of your foot firmly planted on the hi-hat pedal, but bounce your heel up and down; I've seen tons of players do this to keep time.

mentally, you might even think of it as doubling or tripling the tempo, but spacing the hits out further. That might be one way of relating it to faster tempos, if you feel more stable and consistent with those beats. Just take that beat, count/feel it, but leave a BUNCH of notes out!
 

Fleabear

New member
I've always played to music with headphones on. I'd learn a song by listening and air drumming to it...then put the headphones on...and you're tempo and time are right there to practice! I usually break up my practice routine right in half....half just playing away and working on specific things......the other half with the headphones and whatever tunes I felt like playing to. It's a good exercise...at least for me...to play to the radio. It keeps you on your toes...since you never know what song is coming up next.
 

dave lynch

New member
m":1mg1ixso said:
many drummers find 'pumping' their hi-hat leg (without actually opening/closing the pedal- if you don't want it to sound) helps them 'count' or feel the time even when they're not playing notes. If your notes are spaced out pretty far from each other (as in a very slow tempo) you could pump your leg to smaller note divisions, so that you're keeping track of your own timing.

For example, if you're playing quarter notes on the cymbal to keep time, you could tap/pump your leg to eighth or sixteenth note intervals, depending on how slow the tempo is. Just keep the ball of your foot firmly planted on the hi-hat pedal, but bounce your heel up and down; I've seen tons of players do this to keep time.

mentally, you might even think of it as doubling or tripling the tempo, but spacing the hits out further. That might be one way of relating it to faster tempos, if you feel more stable and consistent with those beats. Just take that beat, count/feel it, but leave a BUNCH of notes out!
I agree !! You can think 8th or 16th notes in your head or any silent method and that can really help cuz you don't have to wait for such a long inerval inbetween the beats in your head.!!
 

dave lynch

New member
m":3tkqqr5c said:
many drummers find 'pumping' their hi-hat leg (without actually opening/closing the pedal- if you don't want it to sound) helps them 'count' or feel the time even when they're not playing notes. If your notes are spaced out pretty far from each other (as in a very slow tempo) you could pump your leg to smaller note divisions, so that you're keeping track of your own timing.

For example, if you're playing quarter notes on the cymbal to keep time, you could tap/pump your leg to eighth or sixteenth note intervals, depending on how slow the tempo is. Just keep the ball of your foot firmly planted on the hi-hat pedal, but bounce your heel up and down; I've seen tons of players do this to keep time.

mentally, you might even think of it as doubling or tripling the tempo, but spacing the hits out further. That might be one way of relating it to faster tempos, if you feel more stable and consistent with those beats. Just take that beat, count/feel it, but leave a BUNCH of notes out!
I AGREE !!!
 

SGarrett

New member
m":1n6gst7r said:
many drummers find 'pumping' their hi-hat leg (without actually opening/closing the pedal- if you don't want it to sound) helps them 'count' or feel the time even when they're not playing notes. If your notes are spaced out pretty far from each other (as in a very slow tempo) you could pump your leg to smaller note divisions, so that you're keeping track of your own timing.

For example, if you're playing quarter notes on the cymbal to keep time, you could tap/pump your leg to eighth or sixteenth note intervals, depending on how slow the tempo is. Just keep the ball of your foot firmly planted on the hi-hat pedal, but bounce your heel up and down; I've seen tons of players do this to keep time.

mentally, you might even think of it as doubling or tripling the tempo, but spacing the hits out further. That might be one way of relating it to faster tempos, if you feel more stable and consistent with those beats. Just take that beat, count/feel it, but leave a BUNCH of notes out!
My left heel keeps better time than I do. :lol:

Seriously though, I use the heel pump. Not only does it help me count but it gives everyone else a visual reference to where the beat is. I also use my body mechanics to help me with super slow tempos. I just tracked a song at 135bpm that had a lot of spacious half time parts, which equals out to 67.5bpm. I can sum that up in two words, deceptively difficult.
 
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