Joining a band with a WAY different style...

vahnn

New member
I've been off the kit for almost a year, just started playing again these last couple months since i found these forums. They're great, aren't they?

But i'll be joining an indie folk/country band and playing with them within the month... I'm used to playing in hardcore bands (music like The Chariot, The Bled, Norma Jean, Dillinger Escape Plan, Underoath), and i'm wondering if anyone has any tips for me as far as a kit setup goes.

I currently play a 4-piece (i do have an extra tom for the kit laying around), with Zildjian 13" ZBT hats (yes, from a starter cymbal pack, HAHA), a 16" and 19" A Custom Projection crashes, 21" Zildjian Avedis ride(? that's the only thing on the cymbal, and the Zildjian logo), with an Iron Cobra double kick.

I want to get a couple splashes and maybe a wood block for sure. Is there anything else anyone would suggest? I was also thinking of learning to play with brushes, and maybe those 'bundle' sticks i've seen.

Thanks for any advice or suggestions!

And here's the site, if you wanna check it out to see what i'm getting myself into: http://www.myspace.com/riesage
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Forget all that- just start learning to "speak" in that idiom and groove as such. Your creativity and the music will help you figure out what's needed.

I use a 4pc as well, crash, ride, hats, and a cowbell. Lately I've found the need for a tambourine. It's a nice addition.
 

zerodogma

New member
Just do what you do... get a feel for the music and the band members and take it from there. The most important thing is to have fun and enjoy what you do......

Peace and beer!
 

screamkevin

New member
My advice is to keep your mind open. I went from playing in a hard rock band to drumming for a Phish-style jam band a few years back, and it was so refreshing!! Not that I'm a big jam-band guy, but it took my playing in a whole new direction, and got me out of the rut that I had been in. So enjoy every moment of it.

You may want to just invest in some percussion items just in case, woodblock, cowbell and tambourine are all good ideas, some shakers probably wouldn't be a bad thing either. Every drummer should have a set of dowel sticks (Hot Rods) in their bag, along with brushes and a set of mallets.

Good luck with the gig, man, and keep us updated!!
 

drumbeast420

New member
I kind of had the same situation. I have played Jam, HEAVY metal, jazz, etc... I got a call from a friend who was playing bass with a female folk Americana type singer/songwriter. He said he was hesitant to call because he didn't think it would be my style. He was right, but I am always up for playing so I did it. Well, I have been with her for a year now and we have had a lot of fun. I think each musician can bring their own thing to a project and also be mindful of what it is. It actually help me focus on a lot of things I had not focused on in a long time. Basic beats, playing as controlled as possible while not holding back, and things like that. As far as equipment I found that a jingle hat (tambourine that attaches on top of the hats) and rods (bundle things) are very handy. I typically use a 4 piece (kick, snare, one rack, and floor tom) with a ride two crashes and hats. One thing I had to get use to was peoples reaction to me setting up my drums. They think folk and are not so sure drums belong. I think it is common for people to think all drummers are bashers and it is going to be way too loud. We played one gig early on where I was told the drums were fine, but the guitar and bass needed to be turned down. Haha. I gave them shit for quite a while about that. Have fun man. Bring your own thing to it, but be respectful of what they originally set out to be.
 

stump

New member
Alot of good advice from these guys! Just roll with it and have fun. I play a 4-pc kit and love it. Stick with what you know and have fun. Peace on ya!
 

Rob the Drummer

New member
If you are playing country, remember to keep it simple and tasteful. Country has a great groove too. Even though a lot of people overlook that aspect of country.
 

vahnn

New member
drumbeast420":5oxei3nn said:
I kind of had the same situation. I have played Jam, HEAVY metal, jazz, etc... I got a call from a friend who was playing bass with a female folk Americana type singer/songwriter. He said he was hesitant to call because he didn't think it would be my style. He was right, but I am always up for playing so I did it. Well, I have been with her for a year now and we have had a lot of fun. I think each musician can bring their own thing to a project and also be mindful of what it is. It actually help me focus on a lot of things I had not focused on in a long time. Basic beats, playing as controlled as possible while not holding back, and things like that. As far as equipment I found that a jingle hat (tambourine that attaches on top of the hats) and rods (bundle things) are very handy. I typically use a 4 piece (kick, snare, one rack, and floor tom) with a ride two crashes and hats. One thing I had to get use to was peoples reaction to me setting up my drums. They think folk and are not so sure drums belong. I think it is common for people to think all drummers are bashers and it is going to be way too loud. We played one gig early on where I was told the drums were fine, but the guitar and bass needed to be turned down. Haha. I gave them shit for quite a while about that. Have fun man. Bring your own thing to it, but be respectful of what they originally set out to be.
lots of great, great stuff, thanks.

and thanks to everyone for replying!

the only reason i tolerate country is because the sweet grooves. it's so fun to just jam to, haha.
 

wormdance13

New member
I've had a similar experience recently, going from a hardcore/tech/spazz whatever-core band (which I still do) to playing with an alt/country singer/songwriter.

You definitely have to sit back a bit and try not to overplay. I think playing for the song is the most important thing a drummer can do. Too many times I've seen bands ruined by drummers overplaying and trying to show off their chops.

A cliche, I know but...

Sit back and play for the song man!
 

Potatoe Snack

New member
get a cowbell and tamborine...because why not? theres honestly not too much fun you can have with those in a hardcore band so use them when you can!
 
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