Jazz/Fusion drumming..

GypoDrummer

New member
Ok, so I'm a bit of a rock/metal drummer..
as much as I love it, I wanna be the best I can be..

I've noticed a lot of people talking about Fusion drumming,
What is it? (if that's a relevant question).
What bands or drummers play fusion?
What are the basic concepts of fusion drumming?

Another thing I want to do is to get into the school jazz band..
this means learning some swing beats and such..
I can read music but not well..

any websites that could help me with any of this?
I need to know some stuff about Jazz drumming
and are there any bands that I could listen to that would help me with this?

Thanks for the help! :wink:
 

Metaldrummer89

New member
my favorite fusion cd's are greg howe's extraction and gentle hearts albums. dennis chambers is on drums. get dennis's outbreak album too. and for more of a jazzier feel you can get any of the chad wackerman, dave weckl, and ndugu chambers albums. Tribal Tech is also great for practicing jazz.
 

ChrisNichols

New member
I'm pretty sure fusion drumming is just what it says, where you blend a few different styles of drumming together to make your own sound. I'd call myself a fusion drummer, as I'm mainly a rock drummer but have a definite bluesy element and I'm starting to incorporate some jazzy stuff.

And as for jazz drumming...that's a whole nother ball game in itself. I went to a jazz festival a couple months ago, watched a few bands over the weekend, and I gotta tell you, I could have gone JUST for the drummers. They were unreal. I only know a few bits and pieces but I'm also interested in learning more. You hardly hear jazzy drumming in popular music anymore, it's a pity.

A good example of a jazz drummer who played a rock band is Ginger Baker, and without him, I'm confident that drumming would never have been the same. Ian Paice also uses a lot of jazz inflections and chops. So I'd say those are a couple guys who'd be pretty good to study.
 

drumur

New member
basically "Jazz-Rock"

It dates back to Miles, Tony Williams Lifetime, Mahavishnua Orchestra...
and Weather Report, Chick Corea-"Return to Forever" and "Electric Band," George Duke, Yan Hammer, Stanley Clarke "Schooldays," Michal Urbaniak (check out Fusion III), the Yellowjackets, Jeff Beck "Wired" and "Blow by Blow" etc,etc etc...

I shedded to all of these records when I was in High School.
 

Homki890

New member
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work. However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force. Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved. Bands like Earth, Wind and Fire came to the front, and the age of Funk lived. Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.

Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.

Some of my favorite Fusion bands include: Weather Report, Spyro Gyra, Chick Corea's Quartet album, Chick Corea's Elektric Band, The Dave Weckl Band

Fusion drumming is a hard thing to wrap around. You just have to listen to really understand it. There is a lot talk about groove, and really, the funkiest and most hip grooves ceom from Fusion music. Tell you one thing though, there is a hell of a lot of independence in Fusion Drumming.

Homki890
 

mattsmith

New member
Homki890":161enh59 said:
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work. However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force. Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved. Bands like Earth, Wind and Fire came to the front, and the age of Funk lived. Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.

Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.

Some of my favorite Fusion bands include: Weather Report, Spyro Gyra, Chick Corea's Quartet album, Chick Corea's Elektric Band, The Dave Weckl Band






Fusion drumming is a hard thing to wrap around. You just have to listen to really understand it. There is a lot talk about groove, and really, the funkiest and most hip grooves ceom from Fusion music. Tell you one thing though, there is a hell of a lot of independence in Fusion Drumming.

Homki890




OK Point by point.

1.
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz.
When fusion started to take on a foothold, and develop past a crossover genre, there was absolutely no original bebop anywhere to be found. Dizzy Gillespie had moved into the hard bop and Afro Cuban camp years before. Monk was playing pop tunes. By that time hard bop had moved past sub genre status and become the dominant force, but had been strongly influenced by the collective improv elements of avant garde jazz, which was actually the dominating force in 1960s jazz, beginning with Ornette Coleman's gigs at the Five Spot in 1959, and ending with the death of Coltrane in 1967, and by no coincidence at all Miles Davis's In a Silent Way moved his rhythmic and harmonic intentions away from his avant garde influenced hard bop and started to play around with extended rock jams with jazz musicians that same year. Although Dave Brubeck was still quite popular, the music you consider cool jazz here was long since gone, although pure hard bop like Art Blakey and Cannonball Adderly especially was around.

2. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work.
The swing era wasn't on its way out. It had been dead gone and essentially buried by 1947, although there was a minor big band revival that started in the mid 1960s and lasted through the 70s that was popular with high school and college music students. Art Blakey wasn't starting to get work then, since the Jazz Messengers had already been around for over 15 years.

3.
However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force.
AC/DC released their first album in 1975. They were formed in 1973. They weren't hitting the musical world with anything since they had yet to exist.

4.Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved.
Well some of this is correct or pretty close. Miles Davis befriended Sly Stone but never joined his band. The music known as funk was already pretty fully developed by that time. The actual evolution occured during the first hard bop era of the 50s, when Horace Silver actually coined the term funky.

5.
Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.
I think a lot of people would take issue with you calling Spyro Gyra a fusion band. They were actually forerunners of the smooth jazz sub genre that was hated by hardcore fusion musicians, and gave birth to the devil incarnate Kenny G. It was pretty much a commercial hack job created by radio men, and muzak manufacturers.

6.
Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.
Much of what you say here is true, but fusion had far more to do with music than merely groove. Part of Mile Davis's original vision was to create a lot of modern electric harmonic dissonance that was influenced by electric classical composers like Stockhausen. Now the smooth jazz guys DID rebel against that part and simplified their sound while attempting to create an infectious groove.

But interestingly enough, the harmonic dissonance angle started by the fusion pioneers influenced the sampling you now hear in hip hop music, where there is far more dissonance than there used to be.

Yeah man, it's a tough subject to always grasp, and sorry about digging in. But this is a subject that's always interested me.
 

drumur

New member
I was reminiscing how when Mahavishnua Orchestra "Inner Mounting Flame" first came out I bought it.
In high School we had a band that played "Meeting of the Spirits" and "Dance of Maya" at the battle of the Bands...i think I was 16 yrs old. Our bass player ended up being Ahmad Jamal's permanent Bass Player.

I was playing along with Early "Return to Forever", Stanley Clarke 'Schooldays", Michal Urbaniak (check out Fusion III),

Spyro Gyra has many elements of fusion in their style. They are definitely not smooth jazz though there may be some songs that can fit into that category.
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
mattsmith":2c2webd1 said:
Homki890":2c2webd1 said:
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work. However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force. Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved. Bands like Earth, Wind and Fire came to the front, and the age of Funk lived. Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.

Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.

Some of my favorite Fusion bands include: Weather Report, Spyro Gyra, Chick Corea's Quartet album, Chick Corea's Elektric Band, The Dave Weckl Band






Fusion drumming is a hard thing to wrap around. You just have to listen to really understand it. There is a lot talk about groove, and really, the funkiest and most hip grooves ceom from Fusion music. Tell you one thing though, there is a hell of a lot of independence in Fusion Drumming.

Homki890




OK Point by point.

1.
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz.
When fusion started to take on a foothold, and develop past a crossover genre, there was absolutely no original bebop anywhere to be found. Dizzy Gillespie had moved into the hard bop and Afro Cuban camp years before. Monk was playing pop tunes. By that time hard bop had moved past sub genre status and become the dominant force, but had been strongly influenced by the collective improv elements of avant garde jazz, which was actually the dominating force in 1960s jazz, beginning with Ornette Coleman's gigs at the Five Spot in 1959, and ending with the death of Coltrane in 1967, and by no coincidence at all Miles Davis's In a Silent Way moved his rhythmic and harmonic intentions away from his avant garde influenced hard bop and started to play around with extended rock jams with jazz musicians that same year. Although Dave Brubeck was still quite popular, the music you consider cool jazz here was long since gone, although pure hard bop like Art Blakey and Cannonball Adderly especially was around.

2. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work.
The swing era wasn't on its way out. It had been dead gone and essentially buried by 1947, although there was a minor big band revival that started in the mid 1960s and lasted through the 70s that was popular with high school and college music students. Art Blakey wasn't starting to get work then, since the Jazz Messengers had already been around for over 15 years.

3.
However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force.
AC/DC released their first album in 1975. They were formed in 1973. They weren't hitting the musical world with anything since they had yet to exist.

4.Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved.
Well some of this is correct or pretty close. Miles Davis befriended Sly Stone but never joined his band. The music known as funk was already pretty fully developed by that time. The actual evolution occured during the first hard bop era of the 50s, when Horace Silver actually coined the term funky.

5.
Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.
I think a lot of people would take issue with you calling Spyro Gyra a fusion band. They were actually forerunners of the smooth jazz sub genre that was hated by hardcore fusion musicians, and gave birth to the devil incarnate Kenny G. It was pretty much a commercial hack job created by radio men, and muzak manufacturers.

6.
Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.
Much of what you say here is true, but fusion had far more to do with music than merely groove. Part of Mile Davis's original vision was to create a lot of modern electric harmonic dissonance that was influenced by electric classical composers like Stockhausen. Now the smooth jazz guys DID rebel against that part and simplified their sound while attempting to create an infectious groove.

But interestingly enough, the harmonic dissonance angle started by the fusion pioneers influenced the sampling you now hear in hip hop music, where there is far more dissonance than there used to be.

Yeah man, it's a tough subject to always grasp, and sorry about digging in. But this is a subject that's always interested me.
<b>Thanks to both of you for this combined great post. No disrespect to Homki890 because he put forth a valiant effort. </b>
 

Metaldrummer89

New member
Lancelot Frosty":60whdyns said:
I've been listening to Greg Howe's Extraction.
Dennis Chambers does very well.
it's my favorite of his, howe's, or wooten's albums. you should get the gentle hearts DVD, they play a good hour and fourty-five minites worth from both albums. i dk how to send it to you but if you know how i'll be glad to. just hit me up in a pm.
 

mattsmith

New member
rufus4dagruv":qffg0sg4 said:
mattsmith":qffg0sg4 said:
Homki890":qffg0sg4 said:
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work. However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force. Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved. Bands like Earth, Wind and Fire came to the front, and the age of Funk lived. Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.

Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.

Some of my favorite Fusion bands include: Weather Report, Spyro Gyra, Chick Corea's Quartet album, Chick Corea's Elektric Band, The Dave Weckl Band






Fusion drumming is a hard thing to wrap around. You just have to listen to really understand it. There is a lot talk about groove, and really, the funkiest and most hip grooves ceom from Fusion music. Tell you one thing though, there is a hell of a lot of independence in Fusion Drumming.

Homki890




OK Point by point.

1.
When Fusion came onto the Scene, there were three dominating forms of Jazz. Bebop, the sub genre Hard Bop, and Cool Jazz.
When fusion started to take on a foothold, and develop past a crossover genre, there was absolutely no original bebop anywhere to be found. Dizzy Gillespie had moved into the hard bop and Afro Cuban camp years before. Monk was playing pop tunes. By that time hard bop had moved past sub genre status and become the dominant force, but had been strongly influenced by the collective improv elements of avant garde jazz, which was actually the dominating force in 1960s jazz, beginning with Ornette Coleman's gigs at the Five Spot in 1959, and ending with the death of Coltrane in 1967, and by no coincidence at all Miles Davis's In a Silent Way moved his rhythmic and harmonic intentions away from his avant garde influenced hard bop and started to play around with extended rock jams with jazz musicians that same year. Although Dave Brubeck was still quite popular, the music you consider cool jazz here was long since gone, although pure hard bop like Art Blakey and Cannonball Adderly especially was around.

2. The Swing are was on the move out, and greats like Art Blakey were starting to get work.
The swing era wasn't on its way out. It had been dead gone and essentially buried by 1947, although there was a minor big band revival that started in the mid 1960s and lasted through the 70s that was popular with high school and college music students. Art Blakey wasn't starting to get work then, since the Jazz Messengers had already been around for over 15 years.

3.
However, during the times, Rock was evolving into what we now call Classic Rock. Bands such as AC/DC were hitting the musical world with blunt force.
AC/DC released their first album in 1975. They were formed in 1973. They weren't hitting the musical world with anything since they had yet to exist.

4.Most jazz artists shifted away from the scene, but Miles Davis realized that with Rock on the rise, Jazz's life was on the line. He went to join, I think, Sly and the Family Stone, though I could be wrong. Funk evolved.
Well some of this is correct or pretty close. Miles Davis befriended Sly Stone but never joined his band. The music known as funk was already pretty fully developed by that time. The actual evolution occured during the first hard bop era of the 50s, when Horace Silver actually coined the term funky.

5.
Then, sometime in the late 70's, early 80's, rock, funk and jazz started to meld as one. The best examples of the time are Weather Report and Spyro Gyra. "Birdland" is the classic Fusion example, and Fusion music is still going strong today.
I think a lot of people would take issue with you calling Spyro Gyra a fusion band. They were actually forerunners of the smooth jazz sub genre that was hated by hardcore fusion musicians, and gave birth to the devil incarnate Kenny G. It was pretty much a commercial hack job created by radio men, and muzak manufacturers.

6.
Fusion Drumming is, from a simple standpoint, a meld of many styles to create a new groove. Rarely will Fusion music sound similar, because of the range of styles Fusion has to choose from. From a more sophisticated view, Fusion is about the perfection of the groove. I guess a simple way to understand would be to say Fusion is Rock with Jazz Improv.
Much of what you say here is true, but fusion had far more to do with music than merely groove. Part of Mile Davis's original vision was to create a lot of modern electric harmonic dissonance that was influenced by electric classical composers like Stockhausen. Now the smooth jazz guys DID rebel against that part and simplified their sound while attempting to create an infectious groove.

But interestingly enough, the harmonic dissonance angle started by the fusion pioneers influenced the sampling you now hear in hip hop music, where there is far more dissonance than there used to be.

Yeah man, it's a tough subject to always grasp, and sorry about digging in. But this is a subject that's always interested me.
<b>Thanks to both of you for this combined great post. No disrespect to Homki890 because he put forth a valiant effort. </b>
I agree, Homki is very knowledgable.

We only completely disagree about Spro Gyra. Someone on another post said they also believed they were fusion although some of their songs may not have been. Problem is the songs are all their hits. The original Spyro Gyra was really part of a genre called crossover, a form of music that crosses jazz with POP music, not rock. Other crossover artists included Grover Washington, Tom Scott and George Benson. And yeah almost all of these guys influenced a new generation of musicians who fell under the category smooth jazz.

Spyro Gyra is especially obvious since their leader, the saxophonist Jay Beckenstein went to great lengths in old magazine interviews not to call his music fusion but crossover. He even made the distinction between the two himself as he explained how his music was meant to sell and have commercial hooks. His exact words were to have a sound smoother than fusion so it would sell. SG's big hits like Morning Dance certainly are crossover with little evidence of fusion at all.
 

Homki890

New member
Ok, looks back to his History of Jazz notes.....

...

....


Nope. I still have the three styles of jazz listed there. At that time, The Duke and Louis Armstrong were STILL gigging and touring. Benny Goodman played more symphonic/concert band stuff now. Swing are did not die out in the 1940s. Remember, when Gillespie and Parker started having their sessions after hours at Hinton's Playhouse, it was somewhat after WWII. And they had to wait for at least a 2-3 year recording ban on most artists (didn't write down the exact reason, probably should have). And when they first hit the scene, most hated it. You couldn't dance to it. It would take a longer time for Be Bop to take hold.

Cool Jazz was popular as long as there were Beatnicks around. The Beat's took hold of Cool Jazz and Be Bop. So, at least through out the 60's, Cool Jazz was fairly popular. More soon the West Coast than East coast (There were actually two terms, Cool Jazz and West Coast Jazz).

I'm probably wrong about AC/DC. I don't like Classic Rock, and really never took the time to figure out dates and times.

True, the funk/fusion thing is largely merged together. Wayne Shorter played some mean, gritty stuff. His Album JuJu has elements of both Hard Bop, Funk, and Fusion.

Spyro's more recent stuff seems to going towards Smooth Jazz. Their earlier records have some hefty Fusion tones though. "Incognito," "Conversations," "Summer Strut," and "Heliopolis" are some of the best Fusion songs out there. I stand by saying Spryo is Fusion. And I have ut most respect for Kenny G. Hate his music, but he does hold the world record for longest note held. About an Hour and 30 minutes I think.

The Music is always the most important factor in playing. That's just a "duh" answer. Anywhere you go, if you ask someone from ANY kind of band, what is the most important aspect of your band's style, I guarantee you, music will be said. When talking about what set's styles apart from each other, you have to look deeper. With Fusion, its the Groove. Fusion has such a unique sound because of their take on how a groove should be played. And it's also something I really can't describe. Playing with some fusion artist can give you that feel. It's my favorite style to play man.

Homki890
 

break the prism

New member
The style of fusion drumming came about along the time of Miles Davis' Bitches Brew with Lenny White, Billy Cobham, and Jack DeJohnette. These three pretty much laid a foundation for jazz fusion rhythmic styles.
Cobham furthered this style with John McLaughlin's Mahavishnu Orchestra
White went on to play for Chick Corea's Return to Forever, another notable fusion group.
DeJohnette played with a jazz-rock/fusion band called Compost and now plays with a fusion group called Trio Beyond.

Weather Report is also a very important group in the development of fusion, formed by former bandmates of Miles Davis. Peter Erskine, Leon Chancler, Don Alias, and Alex Acuna were all drumemrs in Weather Report at some time.

Other examples of jazz fusion drumming are Bill Bruford (King Crimson/Yes/Earthworks), and Dave Weckl (Chick Corea's Akoustic Band/Elektric Band)

Fusion drumming differs from traditional jazz drumming because of its mixture of rock, blues, and jazz styles. The kick drum is a lot more prominent than in traditional jazz, and many times beats are not built off swung notes. Many of the beats used, especially in earlier fusion, were linear patterns.

I, myself, am more of a rock drummer that borrowed heavily from traditional jazz and early linear funk drumming.
 

drumur

New member
Weather Report is also a very important group in the development of fusion, formed by former bandmates of Miles Davis. Peter Erskine, Leon Chancler, Don Alias, and Alex Acuna were all drumemrs in Weather Report at some time.
Let's not forget drummers Ishmael Wilburn(Black Market), Narada Michael Walden, Omar Hakim (Domino Theory), I think even Chester Thompson
 

mattsmith

New member
Homki890":jymrztv5 said:
Ok, looks back to his History of Jazz notes.....

Nope. I still have the three styles of jazz listed there. At that time, The Duke and Louis Armstrong were STILL gigging and touring. Benny Goodman played more symphonic/concert band stuff now. Swing are did not die out in the 1940s. Remember, when Gillespie and Parker started having their sessions after hours at Hinton's Playhouse, it was somewhat after WWII. And they had to wait for at least a 2-3 year recording ban on most artists (didn't write down the exact reason, probably should have). And when they first hit the scene, most hated it. You couldn't dance to it. It would take a longer time for Be Bop to take hold.

Cool Jazz was popular as long as there were Beatnicks around. The Beat's took hold of Cool Jazz and Be Bop. So, at least through out the 60's, Cool Jazz was fairly popular. More soon the West Coast than East coast (There were actually two terms, Cool Jazz and West Coast Jazz).

Homki890

OK man,

This isn't a contest, and the history notes are cool, but with respect you should take them down a little better. I learned jazz history from my old man, who's one of the most famous jazz historians of his generation, and a probable contributor to the very textbook used by your instructor. I know for sure that your particular university uses the Baker's Dictionary for Music. Go to the contributors page and find Tom Smith. That's my dad and one of the main jazz history contributors for those big blue books in your music library.

Look man, The Glenn Miller and Tommy Dorsey bands still gig and tour now. Would you also use THAT analogy to make your case for swing music still going strong, when it's obvious that for the exception of a brief popularity subculture of a retro swing genre in the late 1990s that swing hasn't gone strong for a very long time? And what does Parker and Gillespie playing at MINTONS (not Hintons) have to do with this swing point you continue to try to make, when their playing at MINTONS was the beginning of BEBOP, and had nothing at all to do with swing.

And so you know, the recording ban was about the music union getting a royalties for records being played on jukeboxes. Unions banned all instrumental music from being played in the USA, since instrumental was the dominant musical form at the time. The only music allowed to be recorded was vocal music. People got used to vocals, it became the dominant sound, and its been that way ever since. Since the dominant instrumental music at the time was swing, this would be proof positive that swing had certainly been killed off for the most part. When swing was at its height in 1939, it accounted for 70% of all record sales. In 1947 it accounted for less than 15%, while pop vocal music accounted for over 50%. These are facts man.

The beatnik generation was a glamorized subculture essentially limited to a few metrpolitan areas. It was never that big, nor was it the prime listening base for cool jazz. That distinction belonged to college students. Yet they had long since abandoned cool jazz for folk music and jam rock by the time fusion rolled around. And yep, Dave Brubeck's version of west coast jazz (a cousin of cool jazz/not entirely the same thing) was still popular, but it was primarily based on the popularity of one song Take Five.

I respect your enthusiasm man, but your facts remain a little out of place, especially in relation to the question of how all this led to fusion.
 

Homki890

New member
Ok, yeah, just checked 'em against a friend of mine. Lol, I'm wrong. My bad. I think I was coming off a hangover when I wrote the notes. And we don't use that book, we use the History Of Jazz movie by Ken Burns. All ten volumes, notes on. Was probably tired and half asleep. Like, if you asked me anything about Billie Holiday, can't tell you much, I fell asleep during that section.

But I still love fusion, and that Spyro is a fusion band.

and I did have Minton's. Thought it was an "h".

Homki890 *runs away with his tail inbewteen his legs*

And who's your dad?
 

Lancelot Frosty

New member
Metaldrummer89":1bq79tqu said:
Lancelot Frosty":1bq79tqu said:
I've been listening to Greg Howe's Extraction.
Dennis Chambers does very well.
it's my favorite of his, howe's, or wooten's albums. you should get the gentle hearts DVD, they play a good hour and fourty-five minites worth from both albums. i dk how to send it to you but if you know how i'll be glad to. just hit me up in a pm.
Thanks for the offer dude, but it's fine by me.
I'll take a look around, see if I can find it. :)
Thanks again. :D
Gentle Hearts is his other album, right? I've only got Extraction.
 

DGFITZ

New member
Funny thing happened to me, I was told and am still being told that I am a Fusion drummer. Ha,Ha,
I started out playing country for my older brothers, blues for my neighbors, rock for my band, jazz
for my grandfather and uncles, and lithurgical for the worship houses, and just nearly everthing else,
and I was raised down in Jenkins County,Georgia, just a country hick. To me, it was learn the gig, play,
get paid. I just hunkered down and learned the parts I needed too, and did like every style that I played,
but of course I did have favorites, but not to the extent I avoided all others.Fusion, well, to me it was a fad
like Doo Wop or Disco or any other vein, I just learned my parts. Got paid of course.
 
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