Jazz drumming - left hand problem

FunkyDrummer

New member
I've recently begun to start getting into jazz... I've seen a few videos etc and I think I've got the hang of the basic swing pattern on the ride, 2 & 4 w/foot on the hi hat and a very gentle bass drum on all quater notes... what bothers me is my left hand - I can't get those nice off beat notes. Can you recomend some practice for that? Thanks
 

Homki890

New member
Yes, because I have been working on this very issue for the past month. There is a must-have book called Syncopation, by Ted Reed. It is a snare book, but can be used for drum set in the following manner.

Play the Swing time with the RH, LF, RF. The standard Jazz Time. Now, take the patterns in the book, and play them on the left hand. Take them slow, because they can get tricky. If you like, I will make a video demonstrating. If you like.

Homki890
 

Homki890

New member
Ok, since people have been asking, I'll make the video. I'll start....NOW!!

*goes to make movie*

Homki890
 

Johnny Cat

New member
Also check out "Progressive Independence" by Ron Spagnardi (RIP). Excellent book starting with the very basics of jazz and working your way up to incorporating all four limbs.
 

reggaebeats07

New member
you may also want to get "the art of bop druming" by John Riley. Masterstudies and Masterstudies 2 by Joe Morello are both good books also
 

tamaman

New member
"Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer" book by Mr. Jim Chapin. This book was written over 50 years ago and is still a must have for every drummer.
 

Chad Scott

New member
one thing I do is to single out the snare hits alone...just hearing and playing the snare hits until they become comforitable to me then I add the rest..
Over and over work seems to help me..I have been working on stick tricks..The only way to get them consistently is to do thousands & thousands of them--while puting them in a groove! good luck!
 

Justino

New member
I have been playing jazz music a lot in the past five years or so but I really didn't see that much of a change in my playing until I decided that I was willing to do whatever it was going to take to get me to the next level. Go get this book by Gary Chester called "The New Breed", the book is insane and I must warn you there were a few times when I was like screw this this is too hard and it ain't gonna help but keep on it brothas!! I was told about this book by my old drum teacher who was fortunate enough to play in a gig with DAVE WECKL and my teacher asked Dave what he was studying to stretch himself musically and this was the book that DAVE WECKL said to try. The book really has a high demand on your reading, coordination, time, feel while at the same time challenging you to be as creative as you can be (but the book wont do you much good if you can't read). My suggestion, learn to read first then get this book if you want to be a good jazz drummer.
Justino
 

phee

New member
I recommend finding a copy of the 4-2-1 Triplet Grid. It is a marching snare exercise. It will improve your syncopation like you could never imagine. It will help you understand swing, because everything in swing is a triplet feel. But the exercise is pretty hard, especially if you don't have marching experience.
 

Homki890

New member
phee":2tk09vrr said:
I recommend finding a copy of the 4-2-1 Triplet Grid. It is a marching snare exercise. It will improve your syncopation like you could never imagine. It will help you understand swing, because everything in swing is a triplet feel. But the exercise is pretty hard, especially if you don't have marching experience.
I know this drill. I play it from time to time. It is quite tricky if one does not have stick control and some chops. I say, play a Shopping Spree set to Flam Accents for about 20 minutes. You will see some improvement, I guarentee it.

I am working on securing a camera I can use that I DON'T have to convert the movie files. The intention is there, just hang on, I'll get it out.

Homki890
 

Dale

New member
FunkyDrummer":bekf20do said:
I've recently begun to start getting into jazz... I've seen a few videos etc and I think I've got the hang of the basic swing pattern on the ride, 2 & 4 w/foot on the hi hat and a very gentle bass drum on all quater notes... what bothers me is my left hand - I can't get those nice off beat notes. Can you recomend some practice for that? Thanks
The books that people have mentioned in this thread are all good. I recomend a teacher if you can afford it. There are also some good DVD's out now. Try the Ed Soph DVD. It is excellent. Also the Peter Erskine DVDs, Everything is timekeeping parts 1 & 2.

I also highly recomend both the brush DVD and book by Ed Thigpen.

And I highly recomend you listen to Count Basie. Especially with Jo Jones on drums. Man, that band could swing!

It is great to work out on exercises, but there is no substitute to that + lots of listening. Try to immerse yourself in the style and feel what swinging is like.

Trio recordings are great for this because it is easier to hear the drummer. Bill Evans with Paul Motian, Oscar Peterson with Ed Thigpen, the Ray Brown Trio with Jeff Hamilton etc.
 

paraddl

New member
It's all about the trips! Triplets with the left hand my friends. For starters, go with a quarter note ride pattern with a 2 / 4 with your hi-hat foot. Work 8th note triplets with your left hand against this pattern while counting 1 tuh tuh, 2 tuh tuh, 3 tuh tuh, 4 tuh tuh...(basic 8th trip counting method). When it's smooth and easy for you - get back into your swing ride - the trips of the ride will begin to lock with the trips (some of them specifically...1, 2, the tuh of 2, 3, 4 and the tuh of 4)
Now find a book with triplets in it! Read these passages with your left hand against your swing ride and your getting there. I (and many instructors) would recommend Jim Chapins books !!!
 

TrunJun

New member
Another good book you could go through to develope your left hand (and not just for swing either, but for all types of music) is Podemski's drum method. Go through all the excersizes only using your left hand, slowly at first then picking up speed as you learn the excersize... I wouldnt be half the drummer I am today if it wasnt for my practice pad and good ol' Podemski
 
A

Anonymous

Guest
get the Jim Chapin book "Advance Techniques for the Modern drummer...", I think its a much better book than syncopation for developing that swing style. Syncopation should be on had for every drummer, but Chapin set up the best book for learning swing and taking it to an advanced level.
 

Homki890

New member
I disagree. Chapin's book is a wonderful utility. I don't personally own it, but I have read through it, and it is a great tool. However, with Syncopation, you have a MULTITUDE of patterns, covering EVERYTHING. And, with Syncopation, you are able to use all styles. Wand to work up Jazz? Fine! How about Samba? Go ahead! Funk? No problem! Syncopation is, in my opinion, higher, because of the diversity it offers. Chapins mainly centers around swing and Jazz. Syncopation can cover it all.

Homki890
 
Top