inebriated musicianship

jonev17

New member
i have a limit with alcohol. 3-4 beers and i'm feeling good. anything more than five and my foot is all over the place. love a smoke before playing though!
 

TheLoneGunman

New member
To me alcohol and drugs are to music what steroids are to baseball.

I don't drink before during or after a gig cause my wife won't let me, and I can't lie to her face good enough to get away with it. As far as my band mates are concerned as long as we getting enough shows and we're making enough money; go have fun. But I'm not going to baby sit you or drive you home or load your gear or pick you up the next morning when left your car at the bar and you just woke up at some sluts house. I won't drive you to the doctor to get that rash looked at either.

I don't know maybe I'm a bit harsh, but that's just me.
 

Mr.Smash

New member
If my band has a show that we're excited about playing. We do a shot before we go on, I dunno It's tradition. And I only get stoned and do rudiments, exercises. Occasionally I'll play a bunch of songs I know well.
 

SINISTER

New member
I always give 110% while playing so drugs/and drinking are out of the question before a show, after a few beers are always nice :lol:
 

Eddie Money

New member
Wow, I just saw this thread. I played the drums for a couple of weeks just keeping a beat, and we were usually drinking. Then I went to a Dead show and dropped quite an outrageous amount of LSD. I played the drums for six hours and learned more than I did in the couple of weeks I had been playing. Whenever I play now it doesn't matter if I'm drunk or high, I still perform the same. I like playing a little stoned, because I tend to slow down and make the music more intense rather than just heavier.
 
TheLoneGunman":12rpcyeh said:
drugs and alcohol negatively affect your performance
I think if anything can be taken from this thread is that there are many that would disagree. I, however, agree with you.
i'm totally cool with those that disagree. i'm probably not in a band with them.

at the end of the day, science would prove everyone that's not me wrong.
 

Dmgodd

New member
I used to manage a bar, so my tolerance is a little higher than most, but I can say that (from the mngr/owner standpoint) it doesn't really make a difference whether you drink or not. I actually liked my bands to have fun on stage. The crowd feeds off of your energy, remember. What I usually do, and will tonight, is drink beer with a shitload of salt and lime, over ice. It takes longer to drink, and it waters itself down. I typically have 3 of these in a night, and am totally cool to drive home, after tear-down. I also find that if I don't drink a little, my skills tend to be mildly robotic. Most importantly, no judging. I don't care if you drink or not, but you'd better not let me hear you speaking ill of my choices. Peas.
 

Nick Cetrone

New member
oh snap, never thought i would see this here.


i dont get "drunk" before the gig...buzzed...hell yes.3 beers gets me loose but alows me to remain focused.

practice, maybe A beer.

i'll smoke while having practice depending what were doing that day. set rehersal, why not succumb to your muscle memory. wrtiting, rarely. revisions, hell no.

and dont trip and jam if you plan on getting something done.....like playing a song. while looking down at my drumset i had an experience where the snare seemed like it was by my ankles and my hi hats were to tall. i was seeing everything on my kit (that was normal) in a very strange perspective. but i had a few experiences where an open jam went great.


ITS ALL PREFERENCE AND THE SETTING.
make the right decision for yourself.

but if a band-mate asks you to ease up, do so. hear them out, because they will usually have a good reason.
 

Dmgodd

New member
I used to manage a bar, so my tolerance is a little higher than most, but I can say that (from the mngr/owner standpoint) it doesn't really make a difference whether you drink or not. I actually liked my bands to have fun on stage. The crowd feeds off of your energy, remember. What I usually do, and will tonight, is drink beer with a shitload of salt and lime, over ice. It takes longer to drink, and it waters itself down. I typically have 3 of these in a night, and am totally cool to drive home, after tear-down. I also find that if I don't drink a little, my skills tend to be mildly robotic. Most importantly, no judging. I don't care if you drink or not, but you'd better not let me hear you speaking ill of my choices. Peas.
 

kplante069

New member
It all comes done to your situation. I can drink alot when I want to but I won't do so before a set. I've known guys who play great right up until they fall off their stool. when I played out alot I would have a few beers before playing ( always keeping myself in check). When I got on stage I always had a beer and a big water. In my case I was always more worried about the bass player than me.
 

Sudz

New member
Being that my band only gets to practice twice a week at the very most and most of our songs are structurally complicated (let alone 6 minutes+ long) I have to be on the ball during our live shows. I tend to have a beer or two but not for any other reason than I like beer.
 

Exzilibus

New member
I'm a metal drummer and stay VERY active when I play so I never drink/smoke before I play. To me its the same thing as someone chugging a 6-pack before running on a treadmill and that combination never really works out very well.

Besides the physical effect on my body...drinking/smoking DOES get me more into the music but it also makes me sloppy. Nothing beats a clear head for my drumming.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
Thursday night we were rehearsing with a fill-in bass player (our lucky asshole bass player is on vacation in Europe somewhere until Monday). This guy is a well known older local player with a great reputation as a bad ass bassist. He has so far proven himself, as he's learned 30 songs in about a week. We've rehearsed twice, and we all feel confident that he will do great tonight.

But during rehearsal Thursday, I drank about a half to 2/3rds of a pint of Kentucky Deluxe. And smoked a couple of bowls. Substitute bass player stayed stone cold sober.

The next day he comes over to my house to hang out for a while and tells me I'm the first drummer who actually sounded better after a few drinks. This guy has been playing with all kinds of people for 30+ years. He actually told me I sounded as good or better at the end of the night after a half pint or more of whiskey. I can't actually remember how much I drank during rehearsal, as I then went to the bar down the street (yes, I had a ride) to watch my brother play and drank the rest of the bottle with his band.
 

Atmerrill

New member
Qbs":3205us2h said:
I'm always sober during a gig and I insist on the rest of my band to be sober as well - I believe that people don't pay us to see how we screw up after a few beers ;]
Thank-you. I agree 200%. There's nothing worse than getting on stage with someone who goes from drink to drunk. I tell folks we're not there for a party - with me, it's biz. You show up on time (and you better be early!), you practice your parts at home , and you be ready to play straight and give the folks a good show. That to me is musicianship.

Sounds kind of hardass I'm sure (and I do sympathize with folks who battle stage fright, I really do), but there's too much competition for good paying, repeat gigs to have an evening screwed by someone on stage who can't play on account of being in the cups or stoned. Some screw-ups are not reversable. I'd just rather not deal with it. Party on your time, not mine.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
I don't get drunk at gigs, but I do drink a few. As I've stated in a similar thread (or maybe this same one, it is 10 pages long now) the band I play in and the places we play call for us to "lead the party" so to speak. I don't kid myself-a big part of my job is to help bars sell alcohol. It would seem hypocritical to me to be saying "drink up everybody" and not have some myself. Of course, not everyone is in the same situation as I am, especially you Atmerrill, being a jazz player. There are a lot more people that go to actually watch/hear your show instead of just getting hammered and finding a cute girl to go home with. I envy you in that respect. Its not the same for me at the moment.

And I absolutely agree with you on your view of practice. I've always felt that individual band members should do as much as they can to learn their parts at home first instead of everyone wasting each others time while a member or two struggles to catch up to the rest at a rehearsal. Wasting each others time like that is a real quick way to kill a band before it plays its first gig.
 
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