Improper?

likelight2flies

New member
I've been playing for about 2 years now. I'm self taught and I often worry that I'm teaching myself improperly. My biggest concern is that I stroke the high-hats with my left hand and the snare drum with my right hand. Does that make sense? So, instead of playing with my hands crossed they are open. Lately I've been trying to get comfortable with my hands crossed. It sucks because I feel like I'm teaching myself all over again. But I was wondering am I wrong for playing how I described?
 

cableman26

New member
Dude, I wish I could play open handed. If you started cross armed you'd know how much more of the kit is open to you when you play open handed. You're aces brother I wouldn't worry about training cross handed if it were me.
 

Rockula!

New member
I have to cheat to play open handed in that I use a cable hi hat
Once I uncrossed my hands, there were a million ideas that I could pull off now that I didn't have to keep my hands away from each other
There is no way that I could do what I do if I didn't play open handed
 

likelight2flies

New member
I'm relieved to see some positive feedback! lol
My main reasons for doing it was 1) It seem's like every drummer I see plays closed handed.....for a while, I thought maybe I was secretly left handed.
2) I thought it would help me improve my skill on my ride cymbal, which I have trouble with. My first kit didn't have a ride cymbal. Just a set of crappy high-hats and a crash cymbal. By the time I got a ride cymbal, I found out I couldn't really incorporate it into my playing unless I placed it on the left side of the kit. So I had the ride cymbal on the left and the crash on the right. I still have a lot to learn. I kind of regret not taking lessons.
 

cableman26

New member
Yea, I was gonna suggest putting your ride on the left. It's where you taught yourself to keep time with your left hand instead of the right. If you feel like this is a handicapp you'll have to (slowly) retrain your right arm. But remember this there's nothing wrong with a ride cymbal on your left if your comfortable like that. I think everyone would agree that there's no right or wrong way to set up a drum kit. That's what is great about the drums, you custom fit them to yourself they can be as unique as you are. Find a setup that is comfortable to you.
 

SGarrett

New member
It's never too late to take lessons. :)

But yeah, there are a lot of killer drummers who play open. It's something I've been toying with lately.
 

OnusPro

New member
How about this:

Record yourself playing a pattern. Any pattern, open handed. If any drummer on the planet were to hear just the recording without seeing you play it, you can pretty much bet your arms that they couldn't tell if you're playing open handed or crossed-over. Such is my point. You play a pattern to achieve a result. As long as you get the desired result, does it really matter HOW you played it?

Bottom line: Do what works. I've played left handed lead for 20 years without any complaints.
 

Rockula!

New member
likelight2flies":3pzue70q said:
My first kit didn't have a ride cymbal. Just a set of crappy high-hats and a crash cymbal. By the time I got a ride cymbal, I found out I couldn't really incorporate it into my playing unless I placed it on the left side of the kit. So I had the ride cymbal on the left and the crash on the right.
When Tim Soylan played for Victim's Family, he had a hi hat and a crash
His hats were so thick that he used the top as a ride cymbal as well (he kept them far apart)
He is an open handed drummer too
 

likelight2flies

New member
Rockula!":3ealk7wx said:
likelight2flies":3ealk7wx said:
My first kit didn't have a ride cymbal. Just a set of crappy high-hats and a crash cymbal. By the time I got a ride cymbal, I found out I couldn't really incorporate it into my playing unless I placed it on the left side of the kit. So I had the ride cymbal on the left and the crash on the right.
When Tim Soylan played for Victim's Family, he had a hi hat and a crash
His hats were so thick that he used the top as a ride cymbal as well (he kept them far apart)
He is an open handed drummer too
I did something similar. I would use the top of my crash like it was a bell on a ride....which I still do just because it offers a higher pitched ping. Changes it up a little bit.

Thanks to everyone to has posted info so far. It has really helped my mental well being lol....drumming wise.
 

break the prism

New member
I taught myself open-handed, but then switched to cross. I can now do both, which really helps me out with fills and accenting syncopated or odd patterns. I wouldn't worry too much about it.
 

pasta

New member
I think most open-handed players are usually more coordinated because they're using your hands more equally. I think R foot on kick, left foot on hats, R on ride and L on hats is the ideal way to play.
 

Lancelot Frosty

New member
Stick with the open handed.
I've been tinkering with playing open.
Doesn't feel all too comfortable to me, but it opens up a lot of possibilities.
Just my opinion. :)
 

drastic

New member
I don't know his name, but the drummer from Silversun Pickups plays open handed... with a wierd cymbal configuration too... Check them out on Youtube. It looks awesome, and of course it sounds good too.
 
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