I'm recording tomorrow

lexington

New member
So, i've spent most of today (being unemployed unfortunately) fine tuning my drums, making sure they're all sounding decent and polishing my cymbals (a lot of time on my hands...) my set up is pretty weird, i've got a crash on my left hand side and on my right hand side (sat behind the kit) i've got a ride, another crash and a china cymbal. We're recording at my friends studio, and I just spoke to him on the phone, and he wants to use three over heads. That's all well and good, but won't that mess up the panning?
hmm i'm not sure. i've only recorded drums once before, but been in the studio recording bass/guitar and vocals, so i know a little bit. i'm no producer so maybe i should leave him to it? but i do want my drums to sound sick...
any comments/suggestions?
 

SGarrett

New member
Placement is everything with mic'ing. :)

Don't forget to retune your drums once you get in the drum cave because it'll have different acoustics than your room.
 

lexington

New member
i went up to our practice space and tuned them there cos thats where they're stored :) yeah, i've thought about it and i'll probably persuade him to just use two over heads, all the better for panning.
 

Sudz

New member
If panning is your concern, I'd guess he'd use 2 mics for overhead left and right with the 3rd being a direct mic on the ride. This would keep your stereo left right pan intact while allow the engineer to place the ride wherever you want it in the mix. It's a pretty common technique in studios from what I've seen.
 

SGarrett

New member
My suggestion is this, ask questions but don't make demands. Odds are strongly in favor of an experienced engineer knowing what they're doing. Maybe he's doing Left/Center/Right. Maybe he's using one as a room mic'. My point being, ask him why he's using three overheads don't just assume he doesn't know what he's doing. :)

Practice spot, room, where ever they are they aren't in the studio and the studio will have different acoustics. If it's a big room it's going to be really "live" with a lot of natural (and tuned) reverberation but a small room will be really "dry" with little to no reverberation. What sounds great in your practice spot might sound flat in the studio and vice versa. It shouldn't take too long to fine tune your drums to the room, just get there a little early.
 

randomdrum

New member
We used 2 room mics and 2 overheads when we did our last album, and a close mic on the ride. Worked really well.
 

lexington

New member
the dude who recorded me is the guitarist in my band. we recorded in our practice space. things worked out in the end, we only used two over heads. it was a long day!
 

Llama_Dude

New member
drummerduba":3bdtuz4k said:
What do you get from using Room Mics?


Cheers
Duba
Abiance and reverb. they're called room mics becuase they're used to capture the natural echo of the room
 

Alan_

New member
there was one record I played on (Lovetron -Across the Grand Charade) where the reverb was provided by 3 neumann U-87's placed in a stairwell adjoining the (large) drum room: one at the base of the stairwell, one in the middle, and one up at the top...The room was deadened down a little bit with some burlap sacks on the wall, but it was still live. best reverb I've ever heard. huge freaking room.
 

randomdrum

New member
drummerduba":1k2lvi65 said:
What do you get from using Room Mics?


Cheers
Duba
Just more sound, more possibilites. For a lot of the songs we cut out the room mics from quieter bits, then when it kicked in brought them back. Added a little je ne sais quoi to the drum sound. It made it sound bigger but not in a supremely noticeable way, just added to the overall sound.
 
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