I'm going to be open for a little bit

Susanboy

New member
I'm a 17 year old drummer, and recently I've been looking for bands I can play with and start gigging a little bit. I'm scared as hell. My worst fear is that they won't take me serriously. Or that they will and I'll suck. I know I want music to be the rest of my life, but I am so scared. I've never told anyone about this.

I know I can't go in the music world and be the town's drummer for a crappy guitarist and a guy who just got a bass, but I'm so scared that once I get with musicians who know what they're doing, and do it very well, that they'll laugh me out of the place.

I might be asking advice, or maybe I just needed to tell someone.
 

drummert2k

New member
first off, even if you're a little hesitant, you have to go into every audition with 100% confidence. not cocky, just confident. you're mind is in the right place. the only way to get over being worried about getting new gigs is to just go out and do it. you'll have some horrible experiences and you'll have some great ones.

and if someone wont audition you or take you because they dont take you serious, as long as you put yourself out there in a professional manner but still easy to talk to and get along with, then dont even let that get to you. theres 17 year olds out there that play circles around some 65 year olds. you might be young but that doesnt mean you cant do your job in the band.

just put your name out as much as possible. try to jam and audition with everyone you can. if you get with someone who enjoyed playing with you, then you're name will come up in conversations with other musicians. and then maybe they will hore you and so on.

but just be confident, but not cocky.
 

MrBojengles

New member
heres what my book says haha :).

The gig section 7 156
some cities have active club scenes withe live music. if you are hoping to play in some of thes clubs, and get to know the musicians who play there. Get the word out that you are interested in joining a band that plays a similar style of music. the musicians in one band may very well know of other musicians who are forming a band and are looking for a drummer.
If you cant find a band to join, considerstarting your own. Again, talk to musicians who are already playing. Let them know you are putting a group together and ask them if they know any musicians looking for a band to join.
Some clubs let musicians sit in during late night sets. if there is such a situation in your town, take advantage of it. the way to get hired is to let as many people as possible hear you play, and sitting in is a great way to promote yourself.
Hanging out in music stores (other than gc haha just joking) can also help you find people to play with.
Some music stores have bulletin boards on which musicians can post notices. you might find a notice from a band looking for a drummer, and you can also post your own notice. have some buisness cards printed ip. your card should include your name, instrument, phone #, and email, and would be a good idea to list the styles of music you play.

i hoped that helped :D. then again i have only been drumming 2 months. but have lots of talented friends who have had stories during lunch time :) about giging.
 

Rockula!

New member
Being a drummer means that the odds are in your favor
The better drummer you become, the better odds of you being able to dictate what kind of situation you want to be in as well as the type of people you deal with

Try to jam with as many other musicians as possible
This does'nt even have to mean that you have to join their band
This doesn't even mean that you have to play metal with your friend from math class and then play country with the guy who plays acoustic in your other class etc...
It just means that
Especially in the beginning stages of getting bands
If the drummer sucks then the band sucks
And it usually sucks bad

This is not to scare you
It is more to tell you that worrying about getting together with that band that is going to make it big is not as important as developing your skills to dictate your own path when you become a miserable adult worried about rent or food like the rest of us

Once you gain a reputation for instantly improving any band you get into then you can use that platform to search for players that truly see eye to eye with whatever type of music you think will make you happy
It doesn't matter what type of music

There is an 18 year old kid that works in the drum department that is just waiting to graduate before his band can go tour
He even has a drum company sponsorship (not the free one, the one where you pay cost)
It doesn't matter that he is playing the most steriotypical pop punk boyband exploitation music (it really pisses him off when I call him "girl pants")
It matters that he busted his ass to be the very best pop punk drummer that he could possibly be and played in some crappy ass band on the way there
He was always looking for the next bigger band and always playing gigs
Now his band headlines the local all ages venue bringing in 800 to 1000 people
They go on tour just after they graduate high school
I can't wait to hear how hard real touring is going to be on him

Don't listen to people who tell you that you can't do what you want to do as long as your motives are not solely based on fame and money
If that does happen to you then congratulations

The worst thing you can do is to play shit that doesn't make you happy or to settle for mediocrity
The key to being happy is dictating your own terms
All of the above are achieved by being the best and mort versatile musician that you can be for the type of music that you wanna play
 

Alcyon

New member
Amen, Rockula.

One of the best things about being a drummer is that we cross all genres and we're almost always in demand. Check out craigslist in your city and there's tons of bands looking for drummers.
 

funkengrooven

New member
Go for it, man!
Know your limitations, but don't be afraid to have a crack at the bands you want to be in. You never know what will happen.
It's not always about how good you are. Sometimes the band is looking for a solid drummer that gets on with the rest of the band. Band chemistry is sometimes more important than ability. A good attitude is a very important asset.
 

Rockula!

New member
Oh yeah
Pay attention to business
The guy who is deepest into the business of the band has the most power
Just ask Gene an Paul
 

hovis21

New member
This may sound a little un-musician like...but then I'm looking at it from a slightly different angle.

My advice is to treat it like an interview for a job. It's a two way street, and as such, you should look at it as a chance to see if YOU like the job before you get offered it or before you accept it.

Don't take this the wrong way, it isn't meant to sound patronising. You may have been through tons of job interviews in your life already, i've no clue.

If you are confident in your ability then you can't go wrong. A jam session or an audition for a band is a chance for everyone to see if it gels. You might like it, others may not - and vice versa. Don't feel that you should be any more nervous or apprehensive than anyone else. You're all there to see if if works out.

If you do the best that you can and people don't take you seriously then walk away with your head high and tell yourself that it is their problem. As long as you act decently then you have nothing wo worry about. Learn from it and move on to the next audition/idea.

You might surprise some people, you never know. Just don't doubt your ability, be humble if people point out valid flaws and you'll be fine.

Tom
 

funkengrooven

New member
Tom's got some good points there.

Also, as in a job interview, don't be afraid to ask questions straight up, so you have all your facts straight. That way, you don't say yes to something that seems good on the surface, but doesn't work out further down the track. You need to know what's in it for you as well - you don't want to get screwed over. If they can't give you a straight answer then it's not worth doing.

I learnt this the hard way - I said yes to a covers band that seemed to have a lot of gigs lined up, but after a few weeks of rehearsing like crazy and no gigs, I started to get suspicious. To cut a long story short, it turned out that the first gig wasn't for another month. And the next one wasn't for another two months after that! Definitely not what I signed up for. I was out of there pretty quickly. It could have been a lot less messy if I'd asked the right questions way back at the audition.
 

Susanboy

New member
All right, thanks guys. I've got a couple guys e mailing me with offers, and I've decided that if they don't want me because I'm 17, screw 'em. I have plenty of time to become really good, and I'm never going to unless I play as much as I can. I know I want to get some kind of degree in music. I've started composing some stuff, but my true love is still drums.
 

mattsmith

New member
Susanboy":1r9htssr said:
I'm a 17 year old drummer, and recently I've been looking for bands I can play with and start gigging a little bit. I'm scared as hell. My worst fear is that they won't take me serriously. Or that they will and I'll suck. I know I want music to be the rest of my life, but I am so scared. I've never told anyone about this.

I know I can't go in the music world and be the town's drummer for a crappy guitarist and a guy who just got a bass, but I'm so scared that once I get with musicians who know what they're doing, and do it very well, that they'll laugh me out of the place.

I might be asking advice, or maybe I just needed to tell someone.
I'm 17 too, but I do know one thing. We have to play with people better than us or we won't get better, and of course most of them are going to be older. Over the past year or so, I've basically adopted the attitude of if I bomb with older guys what are they going to do, take away my birthday?

In jazz there is this traditional form of mentorship where the older guy lectures the younger guy as a way of passing on the wisdom, and that's cool to me even if it gets a little ugly, as long as the guy knows what he's doing. Already I've been cussed out by some really talented musicians. I don't care. Most of what they said was true. And don't forget they got cussed out by older guys when they were young. So it's a kind of a ritual that everybody goes through, and you just take it as that. You can be the reincarnation of Bonham, but you're still gonna be hazed by the older guys.

What I think makes it worse are the guys our age who think they shouldn't put up with it because of how that wrecks their self esteem. I think that's dumb and a big waste of time. I mean come on, we're 17. How much self esteem are we entitled to? We haven't done anything yet, have families, bought houses. I think once you drop this part of it for awhile stuff gets a lot better.

What you don't have to put up with are the older hacks who think they know even more than guys who can really play. IMO a bad player is bad regardless of age, and interestingly enough these are the guys who are the most hypercritical. But they're only acting out their own frustrations on you. I just block them out. If they keep going, I give them my opinion of the situation. Chances are good that the others in the band know this guy's story anyway, and will respect you more if you defend yourself against foolishness like that.

Worse are the older belligerent frauds with no talent at all, who are essentially idiots who just happen to be older than you. IMO you can lay them out as quickly as anyone else does. They make no contribution to music.

Finally if you lead the band and booked the gig, and you have older guys in your group, you and no one else is in charge. If they don't like your direction they can take another gig. Now suggestions are one thing, but never take abuse on your own project.

My 2c
 

Susanboy

New member
mattsmith":31i5q782 said:
Susanboy":31i5q782 said:
I'm a 17 year old drummer, and recently I've been looking for bands I can play with and start gigging a little bit. I'm scared as hell. My worst fear is that they won't take me serriously. Or that they will and I'll suck. I know I want music to be the rest of my life, but I am so scared. I've never told anyone about this.

I know I can't go in the music world and be the town's drummer for a crappy guitarist and a guy who just got a bass, but I'm so scared that once I get with musicians who know what they're doing, and do it very well, that they'll laugh me out of the place.

I might be asking advice, or maybe I just needed to tell someone.
I'm 17 too, but I do know one thing. We have to play with people better than us or we won't get better, and of course most of them are going to be older. Over the past year or so, I've basically adopted the attitude of if I bomb with older guys what are they going to do, take away my birthday?

In jazz there is this traditional form of mentorship where the older guy lectures the younger guy as a way of passing on the wisdom, and that's cool to me even if it gets a little ugly, as long as the guy knows what he's doing. Already I've been cussed out by some really talented musicians. I don't care. Most of what they said was true. And don't forget they got cussed out by older guys when they were young. So it's a kind of a ritual that everybody goes through, and you just take it as that. You can be the reincarnation of Bonham, but you're still gonna be hazed by the older guys.

What I think makes it worse are the guys our age who think they shouldn't put up with it because of how that wrecks their self esteem. I think that's dumb and a big waste of time. I mean come on, we're 17. How much self esteem are we entitled to? We haven't done anything yet, have families, bought houses. I think once you drop this part of it for awhile stuff gets a lot better.

What you don't have to put up with are the older hacks who think they know even more than guys who can really play. IMO a bad player is bad regardless of age, and interestingly enough these are the guys who are the most hypercritical. But they're only acting out their own frustrations on you. I just block them out. If they keep going, I give them my opinion of the situation. Chances are good that the others in the band know this guy's story anyway, and will respect you more if you defend yourself against foolishness like that.

Worse are the older belligerent frauds with no talent at all, who are essentially idiots who just happen to be older than you. IMO you can lay them out as quickly as anyone else does. They make no contribution to music.

Finally if you lead the band and booked the gig, and you have older guys in your group, you and no one else is in charge. If they don't like your direction they can take another gig. Now suggestions are one thing, but never take abuse on your own project.

My 2c
Thanks, it really helps to know I'm not the only one. I really want to make this my life, and this has helped me. I've posted some ads and gotten very positive responses. A lot of people in my area are looking for a drummer, and really don't give a shit about age. This topic has really helped me. Thanks everyone
 

Gaddabout

New member
mattsmith":wr8dm3ey said:
I'm 17 too, but I do know one thing. We have to play with people better than us or we won't get better.
That's the smartest thing I've ever heard a 17-year-old say (or write). It's exactly right. You live the results good or bad, but you'll never have the confidence to play with great musicians unless you play with great musicians. At 17, you can afford to live down a bad rep. There's plenty of time to recover. Better yet, keep it simple and just groove and they'll sing your praises. The one thing that will really draw criticism is if you go in with the mind set that you have to prove you belong. Just go in and try in fit in with them and they'll end up loving you. That's (almost) universally true of any musical setting (unless you're trying out for Zappa).

The people that make it in this business are fearless. I used to wonder how Vinnie Colaiuta could pull off all those crazy licks in studio situations or in live situations. I would never try those even after years of shedding in the practice room. The reality is he stuck his nose in with the best players in LA in the 70s and made mistakes trying those, and by the time he got to the center stage, he had no fear. He'd already made the mistakes, and now he's a flawless drummer playing crazy stuff any time he's inspired to play it.
 

writheindecay

New member
Rockula!":nlahi2gy said:
Being a drummer means that the odds are in your favor
The better drummer you become, the better odds of you being able to dictate what kind of situation you want to be in as well as the type of people you deal with

Try to jam with as many other musicians as possible
This does'nt even have to mean that you have to join their band
This doesn't even mean that you have to play metal with your friend from math class and then play country with the guy who plays acoustic in your other class etc...
It just means that
Especially in the beginning stages of getting bands
If the drummer sucks then the band sucks
And it usually sucks bad

This is not to scare you
It is more to tell you that worrying about getting together with that band that is going to make it big is not as important as developing your skills to dictate your own path when you become a miserable adult worried about rent or food like the rest of us

Once you gain a reputation for instantly improving any band you get into then you can use that platform to search for players that truly see eye to eye with whatever type of music you think will make you happy
It doesn't matter what type of music

There is an 18 year old kid that works in the drum department that is just waiting to graduate before his band can go tour
He even has a drum company sponsorship (not the free one, the one where you pay cost)
It doesn't matter that he is playing the most steriotypical pop punk boyband exploitation music (it really pisses him off when I call him "girl pants")
It matters that he busted his ass to be the very best pop punk drummer that he could possibly be and played in some crappy ass band on the way there
He was always looking for the next bigger band and always playing gigs
Now his band headlines the local all ages venue bringing in 800 to 1000 people
They go on tour just after they graduate high school
I can't wait to hear how hard real touring is going to be on him

Don't listen to people who tell you that you can't do what you want to do as long as your motives are not solely based on fame and money
If that does happen to you then congratulations

The worst thing you can do is to play shit that doesn't make you happy or to settle for mediocrity
The key to being happy is dictating your own terms
All of the above are achieved by being the best and mort versatile musician that you can be for the type of music that you wanna play
whats his bands name?
 

wombat_drums

New member
we all get scared sometimes mate. just go in there. do what you do and have fun. know your limitations and how you play and give your best. just be confindent and you'll probably surprise yourself. good luck matey :D
 

Bluestonered

New member
Susanboy":240d2jwq said:
All right, thanks guys. I've got a couple guys e mailing me with offers, and I've decided that if they don't want me because I'm 17, screw 'em. I have plenty of time to become really good, and I'm never going to unless I play as much as I can. I know I want to get some kind of degree in music. I've started composing some stuff, but my true love is still drums.
I'll just add.... You'll never know, if your never give it a go!![/b

Trust me, your playing will naturally improve once you start jamming with other human beings. I think you need to like the music your playing too. If the tunes just are too boring for you or you are embarrassed by them then it wont work not that you cant play them, but just mightn't want to! Maybe meet up with the prospective band at a pub first and have a couple of beers and talk music, (or if your underage, the local Macca's??) get to know each other. See if they can supply you with a cd of their music so you can have a listen and play along at home before meeting them in the rehearsal room... you should be able to decide if you want to progress any further. Just be honest to them and to yourself and you'll gain more respect from them. If they seem like a bunch of wankers then say "I'll be straightup and honest with you guys, the band is good (you can lie here), but it isn't quite my style. Im sure you'll find a good drummer that would suit your music abit more. But Im more a funk drummer [for example only] (you can lie here aswell, even if punk is your thing but the band isn't put it back on you so as not to blow their ego's)

everyone has different tastes..... i went 4 years between gigs cause i could find the right thing for me. Now Im having the time of my life. All good things come to those that wait!


GOOD LUCK DUDE!
 

mattsmith

New member
Gaddabout":v3hnqsf2 said:
At 17, you can afford to live down a bad rep.
Actually I wish that was entirely true but it isn't. A lot of us are looking at educations just over the hill. If we bail just a little right now, bye, bye top school scholarship.

Strangely while I was living in Romania I saw the flip side to having too many playing opportunities. There small paying gigs are everywhere, and you can start as soon as you have a pulse. Yes a lot of good young players get incredible amounts of experience early on, but they become hardened and set in their ways before they develop the actual skills or acquire the actual education to play correctly. What happens is that even gifted players never improve because of it.

Very weird.
 

SmellsLikeIan

New member
writheindecay":b28fqn4w said:
hmm. havent heard them yet. il look em up on myspace. i might wanna get these guys in the ridglea if they draw so well.
Damn, if you're looking for people to book in the Ridglea.............
 
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