I'm a little concerned.

Carissa

New member
I recently bought a tarnished crash ride for $20, and immediately, my parents started jupming on me about how to make it look nicer. I'm quite the beginner, no where near playing in public, and I was fine with how the cymbal sounded, which is why I wasn't worried. My dad likes to fix things like he knows everything, and, well... took some 220 sandpaper, a steel brush, ["Steel brushes are made to be used on brass," he assured me] and car polish to a small part on the top of the cymbal. It came out beautiful, but as I said, I'm quite the beginner - I don't exactly know anything about how to keep a cymbal clean either. My drum instructor has told me all I need to do is wipe the cymbal down with a dry cloth every day, or buy some actual cymbal polish at the very least. I took a closer look at the work my dad did and I could see the scratch marks left by the sandpaper. This should be clear by now, but, what I'm asking is, was the work my dad put into cleaning my cymbal safe? Should I let him do the rest of it with the same procedure?
 

stump

New member
Leave it alone!! An aged cymbal can sound FANTASTIC! It doesn't matter how it looks it matters how it sounds. I personally don't polish my cymbals. I just wipe them down every so often with a cloth. They sound as good if not better than the day that I got them. Good luck to ya and keep at it!
 

PDP9000

New member
just buy some cymbal polish or you can just leave it alone cause like Stump said aged cymbals sound really good
 

Carissa

New member
Thanks all. I wanted to just leave my cymbal alone, but mostly I was just worried about what my dad did. I knew he wouldn't stop unless I was able to explain to him that it was hurting the cymbal, and I wasn't sure if it was or not.
 

k7mto

New member
Grab some sandpaper and a wire brush and head for your dad's car. When he asks you what you are doing, say "I thought I'd shine your ride up for you!". He'll get the idea.
 

screamkevin

New member
Agreed. Anything abrasive should never EVER be used on a cymbal. They are the most expensive parts of your drumkit, and also the biggest voice that you have musically. There are several outstanding products available at your local music retailer, including polishes, cleaners, and whatnot, to clean your cymbals that will not damage them. But if your dad wants to "clean" your cymbals with a wire brush ever again, grab them and RUN as fast as you can. :wink:
 

michiganice91

New member
k7mto":1l38880q said:
Grab some sandpaper and a wire brush and head for your dad's car. When he asks you what you are doing, say "I thought I'd shine your ride up for you!". He'll get the idea.
roflcopter thats great man :!:
 

xdoseonex

New member
accually, some drummers clean theyre cymbals with very very fine sandpaper. it works. some cymbals sound good aged, if its a crash ride im gonna guess its a cheaper cymbal, as the bronze cheap cymbals age they just start to sound worse, as opposed to comming into theyre own the way say a vintage zildjian would. i think you you let him clean the rest, (I wouldnt use sandpaper tho, get some brasso.) your gonna get a much brighter and better sound out of that cymbal
 

skitch

New member
Go to the hardware store and get some polish called Flitz. Leave the sandpaper and bodygrinders alone.
 

JSdrmr

New member
When I had my first set, I cracked an "18 Zildjian crash. My dad (also being quite the handyman) saw it and said "Hey, I can solder that together, it'll take minute!" So he did, then when I hit it: "THUMP!!" I learned later on that applying heat to cymbals screws them up bad, and I'm sure the natural vibrations were altered by the "fix" as well.
My general rule on cymbals: LEAVE 'EM ALONE!! I don't even polish mine and I think they stay sounding great and I fell the polishing wears them down faster. Who needs that?
 
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