I Just started Drumming. Advice would help me a lot.

MeekaFlow

New member
Im new to the site, and new into the drumming industry. I just started drumming about 3 months ago. I'v played the piano for about 7 years and have decided it's time to take up a new insturment. Its always been something iv wanted to do and now i am. I have a sonor Kit i got from a local church for free. I bought cybals online, and stands. i have 2 crash cybols a 14 and a 16 inch. high hats of course. I havn't yet started lessons. Im still looking for a teacher. I'v been watching drum lessons on youtube to learn since i dont have a teacher yet. Any advice for a beginner??????
 

kErmit vOn zOmbie

New member
You've been playing piano long enough you should have a good ear for drum parts. Get AC/DC's If you want blood CD as well as Led Zeppelin 1 & 2. Play along to them daily for 6 months that should get you going.
 

guilty_verdict

New member
Learn rudiments- all the different paradiddles, inversions etc. are really good.
Time exercises- playing quater notes for 4 bars, then eighth notes, eighth note triplets, 16th notes, 16th note triplets, then back to start.
Singles/doubles exercises are good for developing cordination- Play an 8th note hand pattern- one bar in single stroke, one in double- RL RL RL RL / RR LL RR LL
then work through the following foot patterns-
B= bass
H= hi-hat

1) B B B B

2) H H
B B B B

3) H H
B B B B

4) H H H H
B B

5) H H H H
B B

Also, here's a hand work out that's good for building wrist strength- (upper case letters indicate accents)

Rrrr Rrrr Rrrr Rrrr / rrRr rrRr rrRr rrRr / RRRR RRRR RRRR RRRR / Llll Llll Llll Llll / llLl llLl llLl llLl / LLLL LLLL LLLL LLLL
 

PD

New member
Start with learning rudiments (as mentioned) and then progress with rudiment expansion moving rudiments around the kit and using them in grooves.
four limb independance getting limbs working independantly of each other.
also linear grooves are good to practice.

hope this helps
 

WesNyle

New member
I never took a lesson or any thing like that. Im decent BUT I wish I got lessons. Since you've played piano for so long you will already have a feel for music, as in reading sheets, styles, beats and so forth. You will learn fast.
 

drumsforlife

New member
As mentioined before, your prior music experience should help you out as far as timing and where certain things go in a measure. I'm assuming since you've played piano for a number of years you've played music with others. You've got the basic format of songs down, ie verse, chorus, verse, chorus, bridge, verse, last chorus...that sort of thing. (If anything, you know how to format songs, at least you know the classic sonata form, right?) Now taking lessons is a plus. As already mentioned, learn some rudiments. They are to drums what scales are to the piano. After learning the rudiments, (at least a few) your work isn't done. Learn how to apply them to the kit. Prime example, I'm sure since you practiced scales on the piano, you started to recognize in certain passages that are fast or tricky, it may be a scale going up or down. Since you see that it's a scale, you just play the scale. That kind of recognition helps a lot. You can apply the "scales for drums" into songs via fills or solos...an example would be playing paradiddles starting on snare and circling around the toms for a fill. My favorite is the Swiss Army triplet applied the same way. Listening to others playing the drums on popular cds and tracks is also a big help. Hearing other drummers' licks can help build your own drum "vocabulary" so to speak. Then you can go beyond just copying and put your own spin on it to make the lick yours.

As far as practicing goes, it may seem long and drawn out, but I noticed some exercises mentioned in here, they are all good. But I'd go a step farther with that and which ever hand is your week hand, (if you're a righty, then it would be your left hand, and vice versa) and double up on the exercise playing the passage twice on your weak hand, and once on your dominant. Go to vic firth's website. They have a pdf file of all the rudiments, and how they might be applied.

Above all else, HAVE FUN WITH IT! Drums are awesome, the best, most creative instrument to play IMO. Drum on!
 

Homki890

New member
Make sure you are holding the stick correctly. Too many a time I have cringed watching a drummer at a local show hold the stick like it's a wet noodle and they don't like it. I'll try to describe what proper grip is in written form.

MATCHED:
In matched grip, the stick is held the same way in both hands. Have your right hand extended close to you, like you are going to shake someone's hand, but the palm is facing your face, so you can see what's going to happen. The hand should be parallel to the ground. Now, take your stick and hold it against your palm. There are three major lines on your hand, creases if you will. There should be one that starts kind of between your second and third finger, or somewhere in that area, and goes all the way down your hand to the fleshy part below your pinky finger. Find this line. Now, lay the stick down on that line, so that it is mostly, if not covered completely. If placed correctly, the stick should be at around a 30-degree angle to the base of your hand, which is still parallel to the ground. If you can't find the line, then the stick should lay from the base of the index finger to about an inch from the base of the pinky. There should be around an inch to an inch and a half of the butt end of the stick is sticking out below the hand. This allows for the proper fulcrum and good natural rebound of the stick.

Now, slowly close your hand around the stick. The thumb should rest on the direct side of the stick, the fingers curl around, not too tightly but not too loose. A comfy grip is all that is needed. With the hand closed, Rotate your wrist so that you are looking directly at your thumb. Here is a reference point to check your work. There should be LITTLE TO NO GAP in the crotch of your thumb. If there is a gap large enough to stick your finger through, it's too big, the stick is held too loosely, and you need to close the hand up a bit. Now, in this position, turn the wrist over until the back of your hand is flat. This is another reference point. A flat back of the hand is too far turned, and you'll be staining yourself. The first position we were at is called Thumb On Top. This on we are at now is called Thumb On Side. You can easily see why, because while staring at the thumb, it appears on top, and with a flat back hand, the thumb appears on the side. In between these two positions is the ideal Set Up. Repeat the sequence for the left hand.

Now, that all may seem like a lot, but this will give you the best position and working from here will give you maximum benefit. However, if you can't find the line, or are a bit confused, here is a quick way to get into a good matched grip.

Hold your right hand out in front of you, fist closed, thumb up and extended, like you are giving the thumbs-up sign. Take your stick, and stick it into your hand, wit about an inch to inch and a half stick out from the bottom. Thumb should be on top, the fingers closed around it tightly. Now, the fine tuning. There will be quite a gap in the crotch of your thumb. Close this by sliding your thumb down the stick, allowing the fingers to retract slightly. Once the gap is closed, loosen the grip by very little, and turn the hand over to the Ideal Set Up. Repeat the sequence for the left hand

That's Matched Grip. It sounds more complicated than it is actually. Just read through it, and you'll soon see how easy it really is. I cannot stress enough the importance of proper grip. One, it will allow you to play with proper technique and will serve you well in years of drumming to come. Two, you won't look awful playing drums and will garner respect from fellow drummers. Three, proper grip will enable you to play faster, longer and harder with the same effort it would take from someone else to play with bad grip and technique and just playing 8th notes.

You wouldn't believe how many times I had to do this at home while typing this to make sure that I was getting everything right. I actually hope this post kind of becomes a standard text in how to attain a good matched grip, since I've seen nothing else like it. I hope you learn something, and that I've made it understandable!

Homki890
 

Brother_Bong

New member
Oh yeah, do yourself a favor and try to learn how to play open handed as well as traditional. This can open up all sorts of interesting things.
 

drumgroovy

New member
Do not ignore your left foot. Work it.

And I don't mean double pedalling. Unless you're really into metal, which I'm sure you're not. You can't play the devil's music from a kit you got from a church. :p Haha, just kidding.

Double pedalling is a good addition to spice up grooves, but I recommend it further down the road. Someone that uses double pedals for grooves and not blasting is Tony Royster Jr., who is pretty popular. Google that guy.

For now, just use it to work the hi-hats. Try using it to keep the tempo as well, as a metronome. That'll not only tighten your playing, it'll teach your brain to 'detach' the various limbs for harder fills. Ok, let's not confuse you now, just work your left foot on the hi-hat, slowly at first.

Play more to songs that have open and closed hats. Also helps to listen to more groovy stuff like Funk, R&B and some hair metal... lol.
 

MeekaFlow

New member
thanks everyone for the advice so far its really helping me out. and im workin on things are comin along better. And yeah i like to play like metal core stuff but its christian metal core so its cool. my left wrist started to hurt the other day i dont know why. im holding my sticks right and everything too. how long does this stuff take to learn the basics? i guess i wouldn't really know the basics till i learned what they are. well keep the advice coming its really good! thanks
 

astev13

New member
MeekaFlow":28u4k88l said:
thanks everyone for the advice so far its really helping me out. and im workin on things are comin along better. And yeah i like to play like metal core stuff but its christian metal core so its cool. my left wrist started to hurt the other day i dont know why. im holding my sticks right and everything too. how long does this stuff take to learn the basics? i guess i wouldn't really know the basics till i learned what they are. well keep the advice coming its really good! thanks
well, it takes at long as it takes you to learn the basics(if that made any sence) practice them slowly and you'll see how fast u will learn them....and sometimes pain comes with certain instruments...im sure your not used to moving your arm like that but keep with the rudiments and excersises and your pain will go away
 

jacky217

New member
guilty_verdict":5p2yjm9x said:
Learn rudiments- all the different paradiddles, inversions etc. are really good.
Time exercises- playing quater notes for 4 bars, then eighth notes, eighth note triplets, 16th notes, 16th note triplets, then back to start.
Singles/doubles exercises are good for developing cordination- Play an 8th note hand pattern- one bar in single stroke, one in double- RL RL RL RL / RR LL RR LL
then work through the following foot patterns-
B= bass
H= hi-hat

1) B B B B

2) H H
B B B B

3) H H
B B B B

4) H H H H
B B

5) H H H H
B B

Also, here's a hand work out that's good for building wrist strength- (upper case letters indicate accents)

Rrrr Rrrr Rrrr Rrrr / rrRr rrRr rrRr rrRr / RRRR RRRR RRRR RRRR / Llll Llll Llll Llll / llLl llLl llLl llLl / LLLL LLLL LLLL LLLL
These are really good tips, and once u have the feel of some of them just move your hands around the kit and get an ear for what the pattern is and don't focus on the noise you make. Look up "Linear Patterns" on youtube and such and you can see what i mean.
 

MeekaFlow

New member
I have another question. Right now my kit is sitting in the garage, and thats where i play it. Is it cool to keep it outside like that? I know you can mess up a piano with a bunch of heat, and i was just woundering if weather it being cold or hot mess up my drums?
 

dave lynch

New member
There are so many tips out there..I wish I had all the answers..I can only say this...Be selective on your teacher if other than yourself and by all means do not worry about what folks that don't play say that are negitive..What I mean by that is, you're not gonna be able to do all the things that the pros do at 1st..You'll have friends that want you to be able to play stuff that you're not able to and they'll teez ya a tad..You're not out to impress them at 1st, but you will be suprised how folks will back ya too..I spent so much time trying to play like this guy, then that guy and then what's his name and then..well you get the point..You'll have a style that you like and that's ok so go for it, but do learn drumming..you'll be on a faster track to being a star if you learn the basics 1st..Timming is #1..Don't do what I did..I tried to be a star in one day and it cost me alot of valuable time...We all go through the pain and frustration which will never end...Oh and also RELAX..that was and still is something I need to work on..Good Luck My friend and Best Wishes to Ya !!
 

phil-drummer

New member
buys lots of sticks, you'll undersand why when u run out.

also , id probly say browsing youtube from " drums " it'l come up with plenty of ppl playin drums on lots of levels and u mite see sumthin u like and even lern a trick or two,
 
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