I got bored so....

metldrummer2112

New member
Last night I had nothing to do so I logged onto DML and checked out the build your own drums section. 10 minutes later I had begun taking apart the awful First Act drum set I got from Walmart when I first started playing. I decided to take it apart, remove the wrap and refinish it. I'm in the process of staining it right now. I'm also going to paint all the hardware and paint a nice red stripe through the middle of each shell.

I'll have pictures tonight or tomorrow. It's not going to look great for a couple reasons

-It was very poorly machined
-The wood just isn't up to par for natural finishes
-I'm 14 (that's a big reason)
-The wrap finish decided to take some of the wood from my snare with it
-I'm not excellent at staining

I'm just doing it for fun
 

Cheerful-Bear

New member
Heyyyyy, I'm 14 and have successfully made 1 snare, 1 octoban, and 1 tom. And I'm in the process of making 2 more snares, so age doesn't matter. I made my first snare when I was only 13. Just decided to start early so I'll be really good when I am older.
 

metldrummer2112

New member
Cheerful-Bear":ny6ebs1o said:
Heyyyyy, I'm 14 and have successfully made 1 snare, 1 octoban, and 1 tom. And I'm in the process of making 2 more snares, so age doesn't matter. I made my first snare when I was only 13. Just decided to start early so I'll be really good when I am older.
Yeah that's what I'm doing.
How do you make the drums? Do you order the parts and assemble them? That's what I'm going to do
 

Timekeep69

New member
It depends on what you want to do. I build drums professionally.

You can do it one of two ways.

1. Assembly: alot of drum suppliers will cut the shell and bearing edge and then drill the lug holes for you as long as you buy the lugs from them. A couple will even wrap the drum for you as well. All you have to do is put it all together.

2. build a drum: you can order the shell to size but cut the bearing edges, drill the holes and finish it yourself. There's a lot of room for screw ups but you actually build the drum yourself.
 

metldrummer2112

New member
Timekeep69":21n64wi2 said:
It depends on what you want to do. I build drums professionally.

You can do it one of two ways.

1. Assembly: alot of drum suppliers will cut the shell and bearing edge and then drill the lug holes for you as long as you buy the lugs from them. A couple will even wrap the drum for you as well. All you have to do is put it all together.

2. build a drum: you can order the shell to size but cut the bearing edges, drill the holes and finish it yourself. There's a lot of room for screw ups but you actually build the drum yourself.
Yeah I saw that you build for Medicine Man. You're pretty close to God on the forums :mrgreen:

But since I'm 14 and don't own or have the experience to operate any of the machinery required to drill and cut the shells I'm just gonna order everything predrilled and cut. I'd rather not have them do antyhing else since I want to do as much work as I'm capable of doing.

For instance, yesterday and today I took my old Pearl forum snare, removed the wrap and all the hardware, gave it a couple coats of stain, reassmbled everything with parts from other old snares I have and now it looks 100% different. It looks amazing in person, but when I take pictures of it it looks bleh from some reason
 

johnisonfire

New member
www dot ghostnote dot net

Drum building forum. You'll learn tons, just do a lot of reading at first without posting much (except for the occasional "nice snare"). They're a bit rough around the edges, especially with noobs.

You will learn alot, seriously.
 

metldrummer2112

New member
johnisonfire":2pnp1jmu said:
www dot ghostnote dot net

Drum building forum. You'll learn tons, just do a lot of reading at first without posting much (except for the occasional "nice snare"). They're a bit rough around the edges, especially with noobs.

You will learn alot, seriously.
Thanks man. I don't think I'd be considered a noob since I've already done a couple drums. But hey you never know
 

johnisonfire

New member
metldrummer2112":1r6t49a4 said:
johnisonfire":1r6t49a4 said:
www dot ghostnote dot net

Drum building forum. You'll learn tons, just do a lot of reading at first without posting much (except for the occasional "nice snare"). They're a bit rough around the edges, especially with noobs.

You will learn alot, seriously.
Thanks man. I don't think I'd be considered a noob since I've already done a couple drums. But hey you never know
That's cool. You should post some of your work. I've just gotten into building/refinishing this year. Most of the stuff on ghostnote is stave and a lot of exotic woods with clear finishes. There's some good info there.
 

Cheerful-Bear

New member
metldrummer2112":3vbvpufl said:
Cheerful-Bear":3vbvpufl said:
Heyyyyy, I'm 14 and have successfully made 1 snare, 1 octoban, and 1 tom. And I'm in the process of making 2 more snares, so age doesn't matter. I made my first snare when I was only 13. Just decided to start early so I'll be really good when I am older.
Yeah that's what I'm doing.
How do you make the drums? Do you order the parts and assemble them? That's what I'm going to do
I get shells with edges cut. Then I finish, drill, and put the hardware on. I'll eventually learn how to do edges and beds.
 

johnisonfire

New member
Cheerful-Bear":zutxha0e said:
I'll eventually learn how to do edges and beds.
It's so worth it dude. Drumfoundry sells shells without edges/beds so cheap that I spend $110 on a router, two bits, MDF and 2x4's and started doing my own edges. After three Keller shells you end up making back the money. Plus, you can experiment with different edges. The problem with pre-done edges is if you want to change the edges for some reason, or have to re-do them due to damage then it's nearly impossible without investing in the stuff that you should have beforehand. The router set up is definitely a must for someone with any building aspirations. Especially you because I know you still want (or wanted to) start a company some day.

Bearing edges and snare beds are actually my favorite part of drum building besides playing something I built.
 

johnisonfire

New member
Cheerful-Bear":14am905k said:
How did you learn how to do this? Just practice?
Started with a keller shell I bought off ebay. Some guy painted it red. I experimented with how the router and router bit worked. tried different bit heights. What started with a 5.5x14 shell ended up being 4 7/8" x 14 becuase i just kept messing with it and cut new and different edges. Now it's got dual 45's with the bearing edge right in the middle of the shell thickness. Snare side is ultra sharp and and i flattened the sharp apex on the batter side with a few turns around on the sanding table. Then i took sandpaper and smoothed out the 45 degree bevels. sanded up to 600 grit and added a few applications of paste wax. The edge is so perfect and smooth it's crazy.

Dude, cutting bearing edges isn't as bad as you think it is. Snare beds can be a bit tricky but there are ways to make two identical snare beds on a shell. If you mess up cutting bearing edges, you can easily recover and just re-cut the edges (if you're okay with the shell being about 1/8" shorter than it was before. shouldn't make a difference.) When it comes to finishing or staining, or clear coating, one bad mistake can ruin the shell, which is why bearing edges are my fave thing to do. Wrapping drums is cool too because it's like "instant finish" vs. 20 coats of lacquer applied one coat a day.
 

Timekeep69

New member
The trick to bearing edges is to make sure that the shell is 100% true and flat. You can have the best edge cut but if theres a gap between the shell and head it sounds like crap.
 
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