I am completely new to drumming. I need some beginner advice

mutantpotato

New member
Hi.

I am new to drumming. I started a month ago. I have been playing for myself, and been trying to learn things myself.

Is there any advice you veterans can give me? And is there a possibility that you can try to teach me some basic tracks and grooves and rythms you can teach me?

Thanks
 

WingsOfMajesty

New member
My advice would be to get a teacher, learn from them as well as try and teach yourself, and also to find out beginner musicians... that REALLY helped me when I was first starting out.
 

drummert2k

New member
agrees with all the above. get a teacher. even if its only until you learn how to read music and get the basics down. once you can play out of a book you can start buying differant books and teach yourself. although i highly recommend keeping the teachers as long as you possible can
 

travbark98

New member
i agree with getting a teacher. i've been drumming for about four years now, and my teacher has helped me a lot. if you get a good teacher, he'll be able to explain things to you in a way that is easy to understand. he will also be able to help you with such things as sticking and reading complex drum notations. my teacher has shown me things such as syncopation (snare), cookbook (hi-hat, bass, snare), funk, and new breed (pumping the hi-hat, snare, ride, leading with left hand, etc.). these books have all helped me, and i incorporate all of them into my playing. without my teacher, i never would have even thought to look at the funk or new breed.
 

brandon8robinson

New member
Don't be cocky
Matter a' fact, don't even tell anybody you can play until you think you're great.

Don't bang your drums to hell, practice AC/DC beats, works for most :lol:

Be confident

I've seen my friend with no rythm turn half way decent due to lessons.
 

scepticILL

New member
Do not get a teacher. Well, get two lessons max, so the teacher can teach you to read and some of the basics, but seriously teachers don't do much. I had two lessons with a teacher of 25+ years. All he taught me is how to hold the stick (which is all over the internet - just use youtube and search drum grip or something). He taught me how to set up the drums, which I already knew; seat hight, which I already knew. Then he taught me the basic rock/blues/funk beats and watched me try to coordinate them - so I sat there and figured out how to do them - took me 15 minutes - lesson over. "Go home and get solid at these". Pathetic...

How useless is that? All these beats are all over the internet and there are beginner drum lessons all over the internet. So I give it another go, and go for my second lesson. Guess what? He's photocopied three pages from some drum books he has - all of them so damn simple (it's obvious he's trying to make me progress slowly for obvious reason and for his self benefit) - and dropped them infront of me and watched me coordinate them. Every beat he's ever photocopied for me I have in my books (Progressive Rock Drumming and Double Bass Drumming). 15 minutes later I had done 10 variations of the rock/blues/funk beats, and the basic jazz beat. So there you go, 15 minutes that I'm paying for I'm sitting there coordinating stupid beats which I already have at home. Just go buy a couple of drumming books and work your way through them.

Then for the next 5 minutes he critiqued the way I hit the drums - by the second lesson I had already figured out the way I grip the sticks and I was very comfortable with it (wrist/finger)... And here he is telling me not to do it that way, and he explains to me a grip type that is completely retarded (yet standard) - the matched grip. I hate it. You have to hold the sticks between your middle finger and thumb; it feels so unnatural and is so hard to maintain. It's so hard to use your fingers (which make you fast and makes it everything so much easier) - so you have to use your wrists the whole time and they're sideways so it's iritating your wrists - carpal tunnel syndrome anyone? Your index finger lays diagonally over the stick infront of where you gripping it, and everytime you go to try to rim-shot, the stick slaps your 2nd phalange join and it hirts like shit! Oh yeah, now to rim-shots. He's telling me to do a rim shot everytime I hit the snare - wtf, why? If I wanted to do a rim-shot, I would do one; why everytime? Then he gives me a sheet with the paraddidle (by that time I already knew what it was and was okay at it), so I show him one - and keep in mind at this time I had been drumming for 2 months - and he's like "don't ever say you can do a paraddidle unless you can do it like this" and busts out one of the fastest paraddidles I've ever seen... wtf.

Then he leaves for 10 minutes to find something and comes back, I give him the money, grab the sheets and leave.

And everyone here is like "get a drum teacher". The dude is asking for advice, not for you to tell him what he already knows about.

There's nothing a teacher can teach you, that youtube, various instructional websites on the net, and a couple of good books cant - at least for the time being.
 

woopy

New member
i'm new too.
and i've just got a teacher.
i don't know if he would give me a great help, but at least he knows better than me .
 

Flatliner

New member
scepticILL":zwey6r6m said:
Do not get a teacher. Well, get two lessons max, so the teacher can teach you to read and some of the basics, but seriously teachers don't do much. I had two lessons with a teacher of 25+ years. All he taught me is how to hold the stick (which is all over the internet - just use youtube and search drum grip or something). He taught me how to set up the drums, which I already knew; seat hight, which I already knew. Then he taught me the basic rock/blues/funk beats and watched me try to coordinate them - so I sat there and figured out how to do them - took me 15 minutes - lesson over. "Go home and get solid at these". Pathetic...

How useless is that? All these beats are all over the internet and there are beginner drum lessons all over the internet. So I give it another go, and go for my second lesson. Guess what? He's photocopied three pages from some drum books he has - all of them so damn simple (it's obvious he's trying to make me progress slowly for obvious reason and for his self benefit) - and dropped them infront of me and watched me coordinate them. Every beat he's ever photocopied for me I have in my books (Progressive Rock Drumming and Double Bass Drumming). 15 minutes later I had done 10 variations of the rock/blues/funk beats, and the basic jazz beat. So there you go, 15 minutes that I'm paying for I'm sitting there coordinating stupid beats which I already have at home. Just go buy a couple of drumming books and work your way through them.

Then for the next 5 minutes he critiqued the way I hit the drums - by the second lesson I had already figured out the way I grip the sticks and I was very comfortable with it (wrist/finger)... And here he is telling me not to do it that way, and he explains to me a grip type that is completely retarded (yet standard) - the matched grip. I hate it. You have to hold the sticks between your middle finger and thumb; it feels so unnatural and is so hard to maintain. It's so hard to use your fingers (which make you fast and makes it everything so much easier) - so you have to use your wrists the whole time and they're sideways so it's iritating your wrists - carpal tunnel syndrome anyone? Your index finger lays diagonally over the stick infront of where you gripping it, and everytime you go to try to rim-shot, the stick slaps your 2nd phalange join and it hirts like shit! Oh yeah, now to rim-shots. He's telling me to do a rim shot everytime I hit the snare - wtf, why? If I wanted to do a rim-shot, I would do one; why everytime? Then he gives me a sheet with the paraddidle (by that time I already knew what it was and was okay at it), so I show him one - and keep in mind at this time I had been drumming for 2 months - and he's like "don't ever say you can do a paraddidle unless you can do it like this" and busts out one of the fastest paraddidles I've ever seen... wtf.

Then he leaves for 10 minutes to find something and comes back, I give him the money, grab the sheets and leave.

And everyone here is like "get a drum teacher". The dude is asking for advice, not for you to tell him what he already knows about.

There's nothing a teacher can teach you, that youtube, various instructional websites on the net, and a couple of good books cant - at least for the time being.
hmmm....wow.
 

robfc

New member
scepticILL":1dsfjlq5 said:
Do not get a teacher. Well, get two lessons max, so the teacher can teach you to read and some of the basics, but seriously teachers don't do much. I had two lessons with a teacher of 25+ years. All he taught me is how to hold the stick (which is all over the internet - just use youtube and search drum grip or something). He taught me how to set up the drums, which I already knew; seat hight, which I already knew. Then he taught me the basic rock/blues/funk beats and watched me try to coordinate them - so I sat there and figured out how to do them - took me 15 minutes - lesson over. "Go home and get solid at these". Pathetic...

How useless is that? All these beats are all over the internet and there are beginner drum lessons all over the internet. So I give it another go, and go for my second lesson. Guess what? He's photocopied three pages from some drum books he has - all of them so damn simple (it's obvious he's trying to make me progress slowly for obvious reason and for his self benefit) - and dropped them infront of me and watched me coordinate them. Every beat he's ever photocopied for me I have in my books (Progressive Rock Drumming and Double Bass Drumming). 15 minutes later I had done 10 variations of the rock/blues/funk beats, and the basic jazz beat. So there you go, 15 minutes that I'm paying for I'm sitting there coordinating stupid beats which I already have at home. Just go buy a couple of drumming books and work your way through them.

Then for the next 5 minutes he critiqued the way I hit the drums - by the second lesson I had already figured out the way I grip the sticks and I was very comfortable with it (wrist/finger)... And here he is telling me not to do it that way, and he explains to me a grip type that is completely retarded (yet standard) - the matched grip. I hate it. You have to hold the sticks between your middle finger and thumb; it feels so unnatural and is so hard to maintain. It's so hard to use your fingers (which make you fast and makes it everything so much easier) - so you have to use your wrists the whole time and they're sideways so it's iritating your wrists - carpal tunnel syndrome anyone? Your index finger lays diagonally over the stick infront of where you gripping it, and everytime you go to try to rim-shot, the stick slaps your 2nd phalange join and it hirts like shit! Oh yeah, now to rim-shots. He's telling me to do a rim shot everytime I hit the snare - wtf, why? If I wanted to do a rim-shot, I would do one; why everytime? Then he gives me a sheet with the paraddidle (by that time I already knew what it was and was okay at it), so I show him one - and keep in mind at this time I had been drumming for 2 months - and he's like "don't ever say you can do a paraddidle unless you can do it like this" and busts out one of the fastest paraddidles I've ever seen... wtf.

Then he leaves for 10 minutes to find something and comes back, I give him the money, grab the sheets and leave.

And everyone here is like "get a drum teacher". The dude is asking for advice, not for you to tell him what he already knows about.

There's nothing a teacher can teach you, that youtube, various instructional websites on the net, and a couple of good books cant - at least for the time being.

man, dont be rediculous.

thats just called a bad experience.

if you get the right teacher, he or she will help you so much.

i cant believe that you think having a book, instead of a teacher is more beneficial. especailly if someones a beginner, they cant just get a book and start getting good. in most cases they need someone to point them in the right direction at least.

my advice to any beginner, is to get some lessons to get u started. then whether you continue them is totally up 2u.
 

ShermantheTank

New member
scepticILL":2ycl41li said:
Modern Drummer has a Carmine Appice article is in this months issue, and he says it much better than I can. He says a teacher is someone who is supposed to teach you to go from point A to B in a straight line, instead of zig-zagging your way there.

Yea, you can get good without taking lessons. But all the famous drummers who have gotten that way without taking lessons are the exceptions, not the rules. The vast majority of people who are well-known in the drumming world have taken lessons at one time or another.

There's two really important things to look for when looking for a teacher. They need to be inspiring, and have a personality you can agree with. Look for someone whose playing you enjoy and want to emulate, then take lessons to learn everything you can from them.
 

travbark98

New member
ShermantheTank":2x2ckdv3 said:
scepticILL":2x2ckdv3 said:
Modern Drummer has a Carmine Appice article is in this months issue, and he says it much better than I can. He says a teacher is someone who is supposed to teach you to go from point A to B in a straight line, instead of zig-zagging your way there.

Yea, you can get good without taking lessons. But all the famous drummers who have gotten that way without taking lessons are the exceptions, not the rules. The vast majority of people who are well-known in the drumming world have taken lessons at one time or another.

There's two really important things to look for when looking for a teacher. They need to be inspiring, and have a personality you can agree with. Look for someone whose playing you enjoy and want to emulate, then take lessons to learn everything you can from them.
I agree. My teacher and I get along great, and we share the same tastes in music. Learning is so much easier when you have a good relationship with your teacher. If you hate your teacher, you will start to hate what he is trying to teach you, therefore you will avoid playing that certain beat or that certain type of music. This will stop you from becoming an experienced and diverse drummer. Again, I'm incorporating Funk and New Breed into my playing. Without a good teacher, I never would have thought to look at that type of playing and my playing would become repetitive and dull.
 

heckelmenot

New member
Luckily for me, my father was a drummer back in the 60's and 70's. He showed me a few very basic things. From there we took turns jamming to Aerosmith tunes on the CD player. After that I started getting into more technical playing techniques. One of the things that greatly improved my playing was buying instructional videos. I don't know if anyone else has had the same results as I did with videos and DVDs, but for me they were just the trick. I tried taking drum lessons, but I could only sit through two before I got bored with them. My advice is to watch as many videos as possible. Keep in mind, of course, that I am more of a visual learner and I find that watching as opposed to just listening was very insightful and helped me learn alot faster.
 
also look around and see if their are open mics or jams in your area being around some seasoned musicians and actually playing songs

and getting cues and advice with no pressure is very helpfuland fun plus you get experience and practice and teaching all at the same time
 

Homki890

New member
One thing I have yet to see here.

DO NOT GO FASTER THAN YOU CAN.

Sounds obvious, but you would not BELIEVE how many drummers and percussionists try to play things that they can't get down at a slower tempo, and then call it good. Retarded?

Get a teacher. Whatever crap that guy up there said, bunch of bull. Bad experience, don't judge all from exceptions. There will be bad teachers from time to time. I was taking privately for about a year, and then my teacher just left the state. The STATE. He never came back. Any reason? Not sure. I take privately now, and it helps alot.

A teacher can spot bad habits in playing that might not be seen of teaching yourself. A teacher is way better than no teacher. You'll see a lot of people who can play and have never taken lessons, preferring to be "rebels," but when you see their technique, its about as crappy as a New York Sewer.

My Teacher Tip is to take everything at a reasonable tempo. No one is going to be amazed when you try something fast, and muff it. Become solid in all that you do.

Grab a teacher, someone. The local University or college, find the percusion professor, see if they are offereing lessons. Where you live?

But let's see, a basic beginner tip. Well, for one, there is the grip issue. Somewhere down in the bottom of this forum, I have a video on grip and technique. Check that out for some tips. When you play set, strike the center of the head for the drumset sound. Striking closer to the rim produces a brighter, more resonent tone. Two techniques for your foot. Heel-Up and Heel-Down. In HD, the foot is completly on the pedal, and the toe and lower leg is used to strike the bass drum. In HU, the heel of the foot is raised off the pedal, and most if not all of the leg is used to strike the bass drum. Some beginner things.

Have fun with the drumming!

Homki890
 

drummerboy1991

New member
i agree. a teacher is the best way to start because then u kno ur not learning incorrectly. its how i started (besides in 4thgrade) and alot of other drummers i kno..other wise. find something tht shows u grip, posture, and all the types of movements u should make..and BE PATIENT!!
 

Benno

New member
1: Your next purchase for drums should be a metronome, not new cymbals or heads or drums or pedals or anything else, you need a metronome and some (hopefully noise canceling) headphones or earbuds. A band will usually want a solid timekeeper over a guy with blazing fast singlestrokes but no sense of time.

2: Don't play above your ability, you'll only be discouraged.

3: Practice.

4: Be creative.
 

JoelCMJ

New member
Ive just started drums, got myself an electric drumkit. I am doing alright by myself. I just had some friends tell me how to hold the sticks and a little theroy about drums. You can totally make it on your own, but if you want lessons thats entirely up to you.
 

Drumtrilescent

New member
scepticILL":2646y6qu said:
Do not get a teacher. Well, get two lessons max, so the teacher can teach you to read and some of the basics, but seriously teachers don't do much. I had two lessons with a teacher of 25+ years. All he taught me is how to hold the stick (which is all over the internet - just use youtube and search drum grip or something). He taught me how to set up the drums, which I already knew; seat hight, which I already knew. Then he taught me the basic rock/blues/funk beats and watched me try to coordinate them - so I sat there and figured out how to do them - took me 15 minutes - lesson over. "Go home and get solid at these". Pathetic...

How useless is that? All these beats are all over the internet and there are beginner drum lessons all over the internet. So I give it another go, and go for my second lesson. Guess what? He's photocopied three pages from some drum books he has - all of them so damn simple (it's obvious he's trying to make me progress slowly for obvious reason and for his self benefit) - and dropped them infront of me and watched me coordinate them. Every beat he's ever photocopied for me I have in my books (Progressive Rock Drumming and Double Bass Drumming). 15 minutes later I had done 10 variations of the rock/blues/funk beats, and the basic jazz beat. So there you go, 15 minutes that I'm paying for I'm sitting there coordinating stupid beats which I already have at home. Just go buy a couple of drumming books and work your way through them.

Then for the next 5 minutes he critiqued the way I hit the drums - by the second lesson I had already figured out the way I grip the sticks and I was very comfortable with it (wrist/finger)... And here he is telling me not to do it that way, and he explains to me a grip type that is completely retarded (yet standard) - the matched grip. I hate it. You have to hold the sticks between your middle finger and thumb; it feels so unnatural and is so hard to maintain. It's so hard to use your fingers (which make you fast and makes it everything so much easier) - so you have to use your wrists the whole time and they're sideways so it's iritating your wrists - carpal tunnel syndrome anyone? Your index finger lays diagonally over the stick infront of where you gripping it, and everytime you go to try to rim-shot, the stick slaps your 2nd phalange join and it hirts like shit! Oh yeah, now to rim-shots. He's telling me to do a rim shot everytime I hit the snare - wtf, why? If I wanted to do a rim-shot, I would do one; why everytime? Then he gives me a sheet with the paraddidle (by that time I already knew what it was and was okay at it), so I show him one - and keep in mind at this time I had been drumming for 2 months - and he's like "don't ever say you can do a paraddidle unless you can do it like this" and busts out one of the fastest paraddidles I've ever seen... wtf.

Then he leaves for 10 minutes to find something and comes back, I give him the money, grab the sheets and leave.

And everyone here is like "get a drum teacher". The dude is asking for advice, not for you to tell him what he already knows about.

There's nothing a teacher can teach you, that youtube, various instructional websites on the net, and a couple of good books cant - at least for the time being.
It sounds like you had a horrible teacher, scepticILL, but you're suggesting that all teachers are this poor, which frankly is not true. I agree that SOME people can learn everything they need to know from books/websites/videos, but most drummers (of any playing level) can benefit from a competent teacher. A good instructor can evaluate your level of playing, your style(s) of interest, your strengths and your weaknesses; a book can do none of these. Books are great for general guidance and practice, but a human can interact with you.

That being said, to address mutantpotato's question:

This is what I tell my students: pick your favorite song from your favorite band, and learn the drum part, including fills, from beginning to end. If your favorite song is beyond your technical ability, move down your favorites list until you find a song that you can at least follow. This will: a)motivate you to practice, and b)ensure that you are emotionally involved in what you're playing.
Then, practice your rudiments(flams, paradiddles, rolls, singles, etc) to the same song, alternating fast and slow. The key here is to keep the emotion and musicality and enjoyment that made you want to play the drums in even the simplest of exercises.
Listen to as much music as possible, and listen to what the drummer is doing. Drummer boards like these are full of posters who like to name-drop, but you don't have to have a list of the most important drummers in the history of music, you just have to listen.
I do recommend getting a teacher who can structure your learning, and answer questions, but shop around a little. You may even have a friend who is willing to show you a few things.
Above all, experiment, reinvent yourself, and love what you're doing.
 
In my opinion I would go on the internet and look for rudiment sheets of of google image. Practice those on like a practice pad or even better a pillow( Its what I did). A teacher would be nice but not everyone has money, so for this case......I would find a friend or someone you know who plays drums to teach you. Most of the time drummers will teach you just beacause, 1 they might just want to show off( But you still learn), And 2 they went threw the same thing your going threw. To cap this all off all im trying to say is, if you want to play drums and have a good time you have to dedicate your-self, you have to really want it to get it. Good-luck man ;)
 
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