Hrmmmmmm....

Rick_danger

New member
Are most fast fills, such as ones in Metal and other fast paced genres, played with single strokes or double strokes? If so, is it more fluid? If not, why aren't they? Is it based on preference?
 

Solix

New member
Generally, I think they're single strokes. I think it's fine to double-stroke on a snare, but once you got to the toms, the fill might start to sound a little muddy, depending on the drummer.
 

druming=life

New member
yea i'm pretty sure its singled unless you stroke each note and don't just do a double stroke roll then you can do doubles
 

stump

New member
You guys are correct that a single stroke is the best for fast fills. Rolling on toms, especially on a recording or a mic'd up kit, will sound like crap. Peace on ya!
 

BillRayDrums

New member
Singles on the toms, doubles on the snare. That's why paradiddles exist!

Try this- Play the singles on the toms, doubles on the snare drum

rl rr lr ll

rl rrll rl rrll

Now play 'em backwards.

That'll dazzle your friends.
 

druming=life

New member
That's why paradiddles exist!
i don't know if you mean that literally or not, but i always thought paradiddles existed long before the drumset came into existence, and that they were used as to give a bigger variety of playing and sound coming from marching snares and what...... i'm asking if you actually know, because i'd like to know the origin, not trying to be a prick
 

BillRayDrums

New member
druming=life":10ru1eog said:
That's why paradiddles exist!
i don't know if you mean that literally or not, but i always thought paradiddles existed long before the drumset came into existence, and that they were used as to give a bigger variety of playing and sound coming from marching snares and what...... i'm asking if you actually know, because i'd like to know the origin, not trying to be a prick
Paradiddles are a combining of singles and doubles in order to facilitate varying accent patterns.

Of course they pre-date the drumset.
 
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