how to stop cymbals cracking

Shalaq

New member
If a cymbal is already cracked, you can drill a hole in the end of the crack, you can cut out the crack (if this is a crack on the cymbal - then you cut it out in a shape of a semicircle c or a triangle < )
You can also cut the cymbal so that it it smaller in diameter.
If your cymbals are not cracked, there are only a couple of points to notice:
-watch the washers and sleeves. Replace them when theyr'e worn out.
- store them properly( in a bag, or lying on a soft surface- never on their edges)
-Play the cymbal properly( don't hit on the edge in a focefull manner, don't dig into the cymbal, don't hit a crash with a tip to get a crash sound- use the shoulder)
-Hit the cymbals only as hard as to get a full sound. There is no need to overplay a paper-thin cymbal if it needs just a touch to sound at its' fullest level.
Hope this helps.
 

dugdrummer

New member
don't hit 'em so hard :wink:to avoid cracking them in the future. watch the angle that your cymbals are positioned.or the way you hit them. don't hit them with the middle of you stick.i keep my cymbals tilted slightly forward..never cracked a cymbal in my life!!!
 
hit them differently and not straight down on them, use more like a slicing movement . its hard to explain but I havent cracked a cymbal since. write back if you get what I mean.
Ruben
 

PaisteAndPearl

New member
Shalaq":b25gai7h said:
If a cymbal is already cracked, you can drill a hole in the end of the crack, you can cut out the crack (if this is a crack on the cymbal - then you cut it out in a shape of a semicircle c or a triangle < )
That works well if the crack is on the edge. If the crack is inward from the edge then you can drill holes at either end of the crack to prevent it from spreading. This method is called "stop drilling"

As said the best way not to crack a cymbal is to hit it properly. Use a swiping motion (hit the cymbal on an angle) not a forceful downblow. NEVER try to create a crash sound bashing the cymbal with the tip of your stick and don't overplay the cymbal.
 

hwesley111

New member
I've been breaking about 3 cymbals a year. It's a drag. But all the advice above is true, and seems to make a big difference. It's really a matter of changing your technique. My first studio gig, the engineer told me I didn't hit hard enough... ever since then I tried to hit a lot harder. It worked. My back beat's never sounded better, but damn, Zildjian A Custom's don't come cheap...

Time to re-work my approach :D

_heath
 

Daddy Crush

New member
hwesley111":11jzr7lg said:
I've been breaking about 3 cymbals a year. It's a drag. But all the advice above is true, and seems to make a big difference. It's really a matter of changing your technique. My first studio gig, the engineer told me I didn't hit hard enough... ever since then I tried to hit a lot harder. It worked. My back beat's never sounded better, but damn, Zildjian A Custom's don't come cheap...

Time to re-work my approach :D

_heath
I hear ya Heath. I also play Zildjians and other than my K ride and my High China, the rest are all A Customs - I have 15", 16", and 18" crashes, 10" splash, and 14" Mastersound hats and I'm averaging replacing one of those crashes a year due to cracking. And I do crash with a swiping motion and play with dynamics, so it's not like I'm bashing the hell out of them all the time or anything. I also am careful not to ever store them (even in my cymbal bag!) on their edges, only laying flat; I keep the sleeves and pads on my stands fresh and new as well and don't have issues with keyholing. I've just been of the opinion that if I want to have that distinct A Custom sound, then I'm going to have to accept that they will break in time and I will have to eat that cost in order to play the cymbal I like the most for what my band does.

Oh, and as far as stop-drilling goes, I tried that once and it totally changed the sound of the cymbal to a dirty sound, so it's not for me. But it did in fact stop the spread of the crack. I finished the show, signed the cymbal, and gave it to the club where they hung it on their wall. (free advertising for the band, right? ;) lol) I had to drop another chunk of change on a new one, but my sound is important enough to me that it was worth it.

Peaces!
Jon
 

hwesley111

New member
Thanks for the reply.

You ever tried the A Custom Projection crashes!? They are just as sweet sounding, but thicker and more durable! I had a sweet set for our last LP... they lasted a lot longer than the regular A Custom's... 'course, I still broke them eventually. I think I just like to hit hard :shock:

Funny thing about trying to fix broken cymbals: When I was in high school we had access to a metal band saw... me and my buddy brought in three or four broken cymbals and had them cut down past the cracks, and were amazed by the sound they made... they were definately different, almost like effects cymbals. But I ended up loving this little 9 inch cymbal I had, to the point of being super bummed when it disappeared from our practice room ten years later! It was almost like an ice bell, or whatever they call those things.

Not a bad way to play with your broken stuff.
 

punchfacerv

New member
i beaT the snot outta my cymbals on stage, but i play very lightly when recording or writing. i've accepted the fact that they break. my ride and hats don't break though. but i like the fact that the others crack and it gives me a chance to try something else. i'll go with paper thins to heavy brass depending on how i feel .i've drill, ive welded, i've cut, but the bottom line is, once the break happens, the sound goes out the window. i keep mine flat and low as hell too. my kit's so low, that the top of my tom and floor toms are level with the top of my bass drum(22"), when ur on stage, you gotta sacrifice some gear sometimes. sound is one thing, but you have to look good too! :) and thats 22years of drummin talkin to ya!

-rog
 

BillRayDrums

New member
First off the main thing is preventative measures. Are your cymbals high and flat? They stand a greater chance of cracking because you will be hitting the edge with a more inward motion.

I suggest lowering the cymbals or giving them a small tilt so that you play "off" of them instead of "into" them.

The kinds of cymbals you use also influence the probability of breakage. If you have very thin cymbals and are beating the crap out of them, chances are you're breaking them more often. Try a heavier model to get a bit more volume from them.

Hand-hammered cymbals tend to break less. With hand-hammering the hammer patterns are not uniform (like on an k. Zildjian) and therefore have a bit more give and resiliency. Uniformly-hammered cymbals have definite molecular structure in the way that the hammering creates rings and it's usually on a ring that a cymbal will break.

If you are still breaking things, go see a qualified instructor to have a look at your technique and see what's up with it. Usually the problem can be solved or diminished slightly with a good self-examination of how you are striking things.

~B
 

CooknessMunster

New member
There is no stopping them ....only delaying them.....After my cymbals start to crack I use them for all my practices... untill the just make no sound anymore.....I keep a good set for shows. That has made my purchasing of cymbals alot less frequent.
 

jwoo10

New member
YES... They're gonna break..

Phooie all this talk about how to NOT break them.. Balogna

Yes you can preserve them.. but eventually they're gonna break!

I've played NOTHING but Zildjians for the last 37 years... the absoloute BEST cymbals made IMHO.. BUT I like to use thin crashes... THEY BREAK.. no matter where you hit them... Given time they will it's as simple as that..

THAT being said... Fixes are drilling the holes to stop the breakage... cut the cymbal down to a smaller diameter... (which usually SUX and kills the sound.. although you can occasionally find a "Keeper"... Otherwise throw it away... er donate it to some bar.. or hang it on yer wall.. whatever.. just NEVER hold back ...

I say WHY limit yourself BEAT the livin shit out of them.. when they break.. they break...

get a sponsorship.. and get FREE cymbals...
 

Rob the Drummer

New member
It's just a necessary evil of drumming. Cymbals break! I've gone through a bunch. A good crash will last me about 3 years or so. When they start to go, you can't do anything for them. Drilling doesn't really work, I've done it enough to know and it takes away from the sound. You just gotta go out and get a new one. Keep the companies in business!
 

soliddrummer

New member
I play drums for a large church in Sydney, and we bash the living crap out of our cymbals - the guys in the drum shop shake their heads and tell us that nobody they've ever known, including heavy rock bands hits as hard as we do. :shock: I guess there are some things you can do to prevent it, but in the end, it's about serving the song, which is what we drummers are born to do!
 

anavrinIV

New member
my old drum instructor swears that if you break a cymbal youre playing wrong...and hes one of the few i know thats played for 30 years and never broken a cymbal. ive seen this guy play with the same pair of sticks for a year and not have them break, and hes not a light hitter, its just a matter of technique

that being said, ive broken a few pies myself. two crashes have broken from the edge pretty badly, one because i was using the wrong technique and angle, and the other because it was cheap and id bash it because i didnt care...both of those were zildjians and one only lasted a year, the really cheap one lasted on my set for almost 3 years (planet z hihat top, converted to really bad crash/splash). i have a paiste full crash thats cracked internally and has been like that since the day i got it (damn ebay....) but the sound hasnt been affected, only the volume....it still baffled me as to how the crack formed and how it still sounds good after a year of playing it. ive also cracked one of my zbt hihats so i inverted them and that seems to be doing the trick. plus it gives me a reason to get new ones...same with the paiste when i get some money (itll be a 17" aaxplosion if i have a say about it....).

for me, cracking cymbals in inevitable. i know that itll happen but i still hate it because at 17 i dont have a lot of disposable income to throw around on cymbals. the good news is, though, that i know lots people who have never broken sabian cymbals and thats what im primarily using, and mine show no signs of giving up soon even though i love to ride my 18" aaxplosion to death.
 

idolxcid

New member
Never cut a triangle or a v into your cymbal..
That only accilerates the crack..
Alwayse cut a semi circle or cut all the way around the cymbal
to make it small..

If you have multiple cracks then use a nice grinder to cut around
them and dont go all the way around the cymbal if possible.
The smaller the cymbal gets the easier it is to break.
 

Jim Freak

New member
Since I started playing about 7 years ago, I have broke about 6 cymbals, and I've changed my hitting technique many times but everytime I change I break my cymbals in many different ways, sometines just a crack, sometimes, a little piece falls, and now that I put my cymbals in a different angle I haven't broke any cymbal for about 5 months, i think more than just the technique is more on how you put them, of course is necesary to hit them right, just look on how you are setting it up. Hope this helps you.
 

DreamT

New member
I tried the drilling thing on my A cymbals but, for me, the break just goes on through the hole I drilled. I switched to K cymbals though and haven't broke one since. I went through about 4 A cymbals before my wallet just got to hurting too much.
 

Mapexkiller

New member
All i did to take care of the problem was to make my cymbals out of iron. You do go through a lot of sticks though...
 
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