How To Record Drums

phlopip

New member
I practise alot and try new stuff everytime. However, i tend to forget certain fills and grooves etc and its real annoying! I do write some notation down but it takes a while.

What equipment can i buy that could record each practise session and how can i get it without recking my bank balance!

Thanks :D
 

Will

New member
A PC, an 8-input sound card, Samson mics and cakewalk sonar 4

Thatd do or similar


Thats like the basic set up unless you wanna buy a desk then it doesnt matter how many inputs you have in your soundcard, as you'll only need L+R as you're just using it to record a practice.
 

scrubs

New member
If you're just planning on recording your practices for your own use, you can get by with any computer with a soundcard and a computer mic. There are a number of free/shareware recording programs, like audacity, krystal, reaper, etc. that you can use. The quality won't be good with the computer mic, but it will work. If you plan on recording for a cd/band that you might like to sell, that gets a lot more expensive.
 

Will

New member
Computer mics wont be any good, lack of clarity.

You wanna hear what you sound like, not what your mic sounds like
 

scrubs

New member
Will":3rwxpy7n said:
Computer mics wont be any good, lack of clarity.

You wanna hear what you sound like, not what your mic sounds like
Dude, you recommended samson mics. Not much better, imo.

:wink:

He just says he wants to record himself so he can hear his timing/fills/etc. Just about any mic that will pass sound is good enough for that.
 

phlopip

New member
Hey guys thanks for all the cool tips and advice!

how much would an 8-input sound card, Samson mics and cakewalk sonar 4 all come to ... rough estimate will do.
 

scrubs

New member
phlopip":1jcxxciz said:
Hey guys thanks for all the cool tips and advice!

how much would an 8-input sound card, Samson mics and cakewalk sonar 4 all come to ... rough estimate will do.
Well, you'd also need preamps (or a mixer with separate line outputs) for those mics, unless you get a soundcard/interface with included preamps. You're looking at roughly $1000.
 

Will

New member
Scrubs: You've obviously never engineered in your life, just because something is dirt cheap doesnt make it shit.

Take a look at the M-Audio Deltas, they vary in price

Samson mics are about £184 for the 7 piece set but if you want just a few you can buy them seperately

(if you wanted just 2 overheads thatd be about £70, and then you wouldnt need a 8 input soundcard for that)

and Sonar 4 you can get for free :wink:
 

scrubs

New member
Will":372h07ih said:
Scrubs: You've obviously never engineered in your life, just because something is dirt cheap doesnt make it shit.

Take a look at the M-Audio Deltas, they vary in price

Samson mics are about £184 for the 7 piece set but if you want just a few you can buy them seperately

(if you wanted just 2 overheads thatd be about £70, and then you wouldnt need a 8 input soundcard for that)

and Sonar 4 you can get for free :wink:
I agree completely that inexpensive doesn't necessarily = crap, but my experience with samson products is that they are mostly junk. Clearly, you know little about engineering, either, as anyone seriously involved in recording would not advocate pirated software. :wink:

I also agree with you about the delta cards. They are good bang for the buck. The Delta 1010lt is about $200, but the OP would still need preamps, as the LT only has 2, non-phantom powered mic inputs, which aren't very good.
 

Will

New member
Just because I didnt pay for something doesnt mean I lack knowledge in something.

Samson mics are decent for the money, yes give me AKG anyday but when youre working on a budget Samson are great.

Hell I've done recording sessions where we didnt have any drum mics, we just used odd mics we could find, and it still turned out sounding fantastic.

Aslong as the mic picks up what its supposed to and how it sounds in the room then you can get a decent turnout.

I suggest getting the Waves plugins if you're going to use a program like Sonar, theyre professional and you may aswell get the best sound you can.
 

scrubs

New member
Will":1l7qc5ie said:
Just because I didnt pay for something doesnt mean I lack knowledge in something.
Well, gee, I really want that renown maple kit, but I can't afford it. I guess I'll just steal one.
 

Neko

New member
I use an inexpensive security camera hooked up to a vhs recorder.
I ger picture and audio .
About 30.00
 

Neko

New member
I use an inexpensive security camera hooked up to a vhs recorder.
I ger picture and audio .
About 30.00
 

blackreign

New member
Since your just wanting to record practice sessions, I can suggest a cheap way to do recording...

go to your local music store and ask about USB condeser mics... essentially what condenser mics do is pick up everything, I use them for my cymbols... but you can also hear the entire drum kit too as well... just mess around with placing the mic in certain places in your jam space to find a sound where you can hear everything...

After all, your just using it for reference... not for it to sound "ultra amazing" or anything right?

if you want a good sound however...
I use a Roland edirol USB audio interface to hook to my 12 track mixer, which has all my hardware mic'ed up, and I use two ccondenser mics as mentioned to record the cymbols... I still have room on my mixer to have a spot for 2 guitars mic'ed up, a bass amp mic'ed up and 1 vocal spot too.
But it wasn't cheap... I roughly estimate, anywhere from 5000-10,000 and that doesn't include any of the processing effects or compressors I have as well...
recording ain't cheap... but its damn worth it if you shell out the money, and learn it.

and who ever mentioned samson mics being crap... I started using them when I first started my studio and I find they are actually pretty good...

Cheap, but decent...
Shure makes better mics though... and they can be just as cheap...
 

golfchance

New member
If you can find them, I recommend the old Realistic PZM mics (cat# 33-1090B). If you're just looking to capture what's going on in the room, they're great! With the right adapters, you should be able to connect them directly to the mic inputs on any stereo recorder.
 

Will

New member
scrubs":334wz60b said:
Will":334wz60b said:
Just because I didnt pay for something doesnt mean I lack knowledge in something.
Well, gee, I really want that renown maple kit, but I can't afford it. I guess I'll just steal one.
So you're admitting to not knowing anything about drums then?

That would be the reason you quoted that yeah?
 

FelterSkelter

New member
There are several ways to skin a cat. If you are just looking to record your beats for future reference and exercises.... I would suggest that you get a mini tape recorder from Radio Shack for $50.
If you are looking to record drums for a serious project you will have to invest further. There are many ways in which you can do this. You can buy a 90's era 4-track recorder for real cheap and Shure microphones start at about $100.
IT'S NOT WHAT YOU HAVE IT IS HOW YOU USE IT. The earliest recordings were done on wax! Listen to old jazz records and how the actual recording sounds. Compared to today's times, there was virtually no technology.

I'm certainly not an advocate for buying crappy gear, but I will endorse buying entry-level/basic gear and making it work.
 

dirk

New member
Some good ideas there guys, but I do recomend that you also continue to write your stuff down. Better for learning, better for the retention. If you practice that you will be able to work on things wherever you are. Equipment around you or not...
 

FelterSkelter

New member
I must disagree. Doing it for three hours is better for your retention. I've never understood having to write things down like that. If you're working on something you want to do, you know what it'll sound like.
 
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