how the hell do people brake cymbals?

SGarrett

New member
With the brake pedal. :p

People break cymbals with improper technique, improper positioning, improper cymbal selection, and/or just plain hitting too hard.
 

king_friday

New member
im a really heavy hitter, always have been. ofcourse one of the drawbacks is breaking equipment. ive gone through many cymbals. not from improper use, and i take good care of my cymbals, i just hit them really hard when im playing.
 

SGarrett

New member
There's a limit to how loud a cymbal will get and hitting it harder than that will cause damage. I hammer my cymbals but I haven't broken one in years.
 

GypoDrummer

New member
i've never broken a cymbal, in the 5-6 years of playing I've had,
although, i wouldn't call myself a hard hitter, i do hit a little harder than some other drummers i know... :lol:
 

Homki890

New member
In my ten years of drumming, I've cracked a cymbal, and that's it. Over time, cymbals will wear out, and just start to deteriorate, no matter how well taken care of they are. It's just a fact of life.

Homki890
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
For the most part, people do not like being told that what they are doing is wrong, but in reality, if you're breaking cymbals often, something is wrong. It seems to me that some people think that breaking cymbals is a kind of right of passage. I have cracked one cymbal, an 18" Wuhan china, because I dropped it. Whoops. I'm thinking about dremeling out the crack and maybe popping some rivets in it to see how it sounds.
 

GeorgeDemise

New member
I've always wondered, do you think temperature comes into it at all? Because surely when they're cold they'd be more brittle? I go through quite a few cymbals, I always keep receipts though. I love warrentys.
 

Rockula!

New member
I remember that question being addressed in Modern Drummer some years back and the guy from Zildjian said it would have to be colder than a human could stand to make a cymbal brittle

I break cymbals
I know that I don't need to hit as hard
I know how "improper" my technique is
I also know that drumming is like sculpture to me
You have to destroy some things in order to create something
I know for a fact that my overly aggressive style makes a difference because people still remember my aspect of the performance when they cannot recall other band members

The only thing I can do is buy large diameter cymbals
 

Airborne Ranger

New member
I play hard sometimes too and I still use the same Zildjian cymbals I got when I was 10 years old. My early instructors really stressed the correct way to hit cymbals so I have dented a cymbal (an old Camber 16"), but never actually broken one. Bad technique and overplaying the cymbal are the biggest reason for beakage. Unfortunetly, cymbals have become a very expensive disposable item, like sticks and heads.
 

rufus4dagruv

New member
Rockula!":2059v2ax said:
I know for a fact that my overly aggressive style makes a difference because people still remember my aspect of the performance when they cannot recall other band members
This was the one counterpoint I could think of. If it's part of the show, well, these are the risks we take. The difference between you and the people starting threads wondering why their cymbals are breaking is that you understand why the cymbals break. Good post.
 

SGarrett

New member
I say this a lot. I don't play like Animal and people in the know still tell me "that's the best performance by a drummer I've seen in years", "you're the best drummer in town", etc. You don't have to kill your gear to put on a good and memorable show. It does take all kinds though. Personally, I'd rather buy new gear than have to keep rebuying the same gear over and over.
 

NG1284

New member
Hm.

Could someone post a good guide for cymbal technique? I'm willing to be mine's a bit laxed, I've broken a few.
 

SGarrett

New member
NG1284":1qtsf4o6 said:
Hm.

Could someone post a good guide for cymbal technique? I'm willing to be mine's a bit laxed, I've broken a few.
Don't drive through the cymbals, hit them with a glancing blow like you're trying to shave a piece of cheese off a block. When your stick makes contact, release your grip instead of holding it really tight. Angle your cymbals towards you, just a little. That way you aren't playing right on the edge or the bow (the part right before the bell). And I think the last part is to have your cymbal felts/wing nuts loose enough that cymbals can move as freely as they want. Tight felts/wing nuts choke cymbals of their sound and ability to release energy.

For a more practical example. Dennis Chambers and Dave Weckl play extremely hard and very seldom ever break a cymbal.
 

Rockula!

New member
SGarrett":31m9tv4g said:
I say this a lot. I don't play like Animal and people in the know still tell me "that's the best performance by a drummer I've seen in years", "you're the best drummer in town", etc. You don't have to kill your gear to put on a good and memorable show. It does take all kinds though. Personally, I'd rather buy new gear than have to keep rebuying the same gear over and over.
You are correct
However, a physical performance fits my personality
I assume that you are recieving accolades for your refined technique which is admirable
People in the know seem o be farthest from my mind when I'm performing because they think the know everything
I'd rather get a reaction from the average Joe than my peers
As far as buying new gear?
My rapidly evolving style dictates that most broken gear makes way for new and different models anyways

Also, there's nothing better than tearing off a raggedy piece of china cymbal and sticking into the stage to drive a point home
 

king_friday

New member
SGarrett":9who0hxe said:
I say this a lot. I don't play like Animal and people in the know still tell me "that's the best performance by a drummer I've seen in years", "you're the best drummer in town", etc. You don't have to kill your gear to put on a good and memorable show. It does take all kinds though. Personally, I'd rather buy new gear than have to keep rebuying the same gear over and over.
ive heard those same exact things before, and i do play like animal. now im not trying to say im better then you, or that the way you play is wrong, im sure you a quite good. however my style is to play very loud and powerful. it just doesnt feel right to me if im not bashin away. it does mean i break cymbals, lots of skins, sticks and even rims. but i have come to terms with that, and found equipment that lasts the longest for me. i believe it was Elvin Jones that said "being loud is the nature of the instrument".
 

SGarrett

New member
king_friday":258mfhet said:
SGarrett":258mfhet said:
I say this a lot. I don't play like Animal and people in the know still tell me "that's the best performance by a drummer I've seen in years", "you're the best drummer in town", etc. You don't have to kill your gear to put on a good and memorable show. It does take all kinds though. Personally, I'd rather buy new gear than have to keep rebuying the same gear over and over.
ive heard those same exact things before, and i do play like animal. now im not trying to say im better then you, or that the way you play is wrong, im sure you a quite good. however my style is to play very loud and powerful. it just doesnt feel right to me if im not bashin away. it does mean i break cymbals, lots of skins, sticks and even rims. but i have come to terms with that, and found equipment that lasts the longest for me. i believe it was Elvin Jones that said "being loud is the nature of the instrument".
When I'm playing loud, almost every note is a Moeller stroke and cymbal crashes are almost always a high Moeller stroke. I am not a tapper. I'm loud even when playing quietly and more than a few bands have had to turn up to match my unmic'ed volume...that includes hard rock and metal bands. I just don't overplay my gear because, like I said, it only gets so loud. I'm not trying to tell you how to play, just that you don't need to break cymbals to put on a good visual show. You'll get past the basher phase at some point and your opinion of how you play right now will change drastically. It happens to everyone at some point. Learn how to play with Moeller strokes and you'll use a lot less energy to play the same volume. As a side benefit, your grip will be more relaxed and you won't break cymbals anywhere near as much. Once you stop having to constantly replace cymbals you'll find that you have more money for other things in life.
 

king_friday

New member
i havnt actually had to buy a cymbal in quite some time, like i said i think i have found the right gear for my style of playing. im not 100% on the term moeller strokes. what exactly does that mean?
 

SGarrett

New member
king_friday":139kezed said:
i havnt actually had to buy a cymbal in quite some time, like i said i think i have found the right gear for my style of playing. im not 100% on the term moeller strokes. what exactly does that mean?
You're lucky the store you go to will replace your cymbals so readily. They're actually going out of their way to do so because the companies get tired of having to replace cymbals for the same people on a regular basis. They actually start to cover less or give you less time to break them in.

Here's a great place to learn about Moeller playing; http://www.vicfirth.com/education/drumset/domfamularo.html. Make sure you watch the Jim Chapin clips along with the clips near the bottom...including the one about the history of the technique.

In a nutshell, it's like cracking a whip. Your arm is the whip and the tip of your stick is the tip of the whip. Done correctly, you barely have to put any muscle into your playing to get high volume levels.
 
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