How often do you rehearse and practice ?

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
I feel that sometimes I don't rehearse enough
Once a week with a band and here and there by myself during the week (45 min sets)
I guess it's all about acheiving goals and objectives and how quick you want to learn them.
Cascinaidrums
www.myspace.com/bonefacemusic


happy new year
Rock to the bone
 

Spydr2000

New member
Great topic... Your best rehearsal is by yourself, breaking things down cleaning your chops up. 2hrs a day is just enought to keep your playing on the up.

As far as the band.. once a week is all you need unless your writing a album. Like I mentioned about practice your parts on your own, get them down and when you get together everything should fall in place. But that goes for everyone in the band. Nothing sucks more than band practice with some struggling because they don't know the song because they didn't spend enough time getting their part down.
 

Nigel Letter

New member
With me I spend at least 2hrs a day with my practice pad and a click track doing ruidements and I'll adjust the tempo to different speeds throughout the two hours.

I then spend 4hrs playing on my Remo practice kit going through all our songs.

I spend another hour on my drum set with my bass player working on songs. This really helps the rhythm section tighten up.

As a band we rehearse for 2hrs a day if we are not on the road.

Its a full time job but the practice it worth it.
 

Masterthief24

New member
I come home from school and warm up, then start with one stroke rolls then doubles, then the same for my double bass.

Then I pop in whatever I feel like playing along to and rock out. After that I put in something I've never played before and try to learn as much as possible.

I'll practice anywhere from 2 to 4 hours every day by myself, and on weekends with the band.
 

zen_drummer

New member
Back when I used to teach, I used to tell students that they should practice at least one hour per day. It's important to note, however, that I went on to emphasize the "per day" portion, because it's not so much about the actual time in a session, as it is about the fact that they should work on their chops every day even if they cannot stay focused for an entire hour. If they are continuing to be productive, there is also no reason to stop as soon as the hour is up... go as long as you can dedictate the time to do. If after 15 minutes you're just not getting into it, then move on. If it's coming together, keep going. Once again, the key is "every day".

What we're building in a lot of cases is patterns that automatically happen when they put their sticks in their hands, and even a few minutes per day would be more effective than sitting there for 7 hours one day each week.

I also emphasize the importance of walking away from the drum kit, and sitting there with just a practice pad and sticks working on the rudiments. These are the basic building blocks of ALL drumming, and every drum beat, or fill, or solo will have it's basis in these rudiments.

I have seen through the years countless players that have found clever ways to avoid the basics, and these are the drummers that in effect, cripple themselves by making it so they can't hear where a rudiment is being applied in popular music, thus making it much harder to figure out what the original drummer actually played in the first place.

It's fun to work on the full kit, and work on tricky patterns to develop independence, but without the basic rudimental building blocks, all the four limb independence in the world won't make it easier to play even the simplest of drum parts.

So to answer the question, practice every day for as long as you can comfortably apply yourself. The important part is that you're working on your skills each and every day.
 

Gaddabout

New member
You should only practice on the days that you breathe. You should only practice as often as you eat. You should only practice as long as it takes you to waste whatever free time you have.
 
Congratulations on your new kit devilspain, that must be really exciting!

For practicing, I practice a 2-3 hours a day on my own. For about 45 I work on rudiments and speed with my hands and feet doing different exercises, about a half hour playing to my Ipod just working on different songs I like to practice to and challenge myself with, and then the other 45 minutes I play with a metronome and just work on different fills and beats that I want to bring to my band.
 

Gaddabout

New member
shirleythewerewolf":212n66lm said:
For practicing, I practice a 2-3 hours a day on my own. For about 45 I work on rudiments and speed with my hands and feet doing different exercises, about a half hour playing to my Ipod just working on different songs I like to practice to and challenge myself with, and then the other 45 minutes I play with a metronome and just work on different fills and beats that I want to bring to my band.
That's a healthy practice routine. Do you leave room for new material, such as systematic books? Might be something to include in your regiment.

Also, as Chris Whitten (Paul McCartney, World Party, etc.) will tell you, always leave time to become a person, as well. Read books and stuff.
 

loop

New member
I have rehearsals 2 times a week. I practice the other 5 days for 1-3 hours at home. Not enough, though
 

Dee

New member
Not enough, I have to work and study alot now so unfortunatly i can't practice as often as i would like, the only time now i really practice is for about 3 hours with my band every week or so. Naughty i know, but i am gonna make sure i have a tap at least an hour everyday!
 

markt36264

New member
Does clicking your teeth, patting your feet and tapping your fingers 24/7 count as practice?


Please...someone help me stop!!!
 

c360blaster

New member
I barly ever get to practice anymore. i work third shift andi live in a house where somone is ALWAYS sleeping (hopefully that'll change soon), and before that i was in an apartment...

i was thinking about renting out a storage building and practicing there, anyone got some experence with that?
 

vargasdrumbeast

New member
When I come home from school I usally try to finish my HW as quick as possible :lol:

then jump on my set with a big jug of gatoraide and i just practice everything for about 4 or 5 hours

on weekends my band tries to practice, sometimes issues come up and rehearsals get cancelled but since we all go to the same school we usually just jam afterwords for a little while
 

CASCINAIDRUMS

New member
c360blaster":15a79rf8 said:
I barly ever get to practice anymore. i work third shift andi live in a house where somone is ALWAYS sleeping (hopefully that'll change soon), and before that i was in an apartment...

i was thinking about renting out a storage building and practicing there, anyone got some experence with that?
I've done that with a band it was pretty cool, it even had HBO www.myspace.com/bonefacemusic
Cascinaidrums
 
Gaddabout":16cpek7n said:
shirleythewerewolf":16cpek7n said:
For practicing, I practice a 2-3 hours a day on my own. For about 45 I work on rudiments and speed with my hands and feet doing different exercises, about a half hour playing to my Ipod just working on different songs I like to practice to and challenge myself with, and then the other 45 minutes I play with a metronome and just work on different fills and beats that I want to bring to my band.
That's a healthy practice routine. Do you leave room for new material, such as systematic books? Might be something to include in your regiment.

Also, as Chris Whitten (Paul McCartney, World Party, etc.) will tell you, always leave time to become a person, as well. Read books and stuff.
I definitely do, I work out of Stick Control religiously as well as Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer by Jim Chapin, The Easy Read Rock book by Jack Brand (the groover's section in there is amazing), Advanced Funk Studies by Rick Latham, and Advanced Concepts by Kim Plainfield. I love working out of books also because it helps me to learn so much. I always study styles that I don't play with my band to branch out. Since I've followed that practice regiment my playing has really improved.

I definitely leave time to be a person too lol. I'm a big skateboarder :)
 

Gaddabout

New member
shirleythewerewolf":2lx53xtq said:
Gaddabout":2lx53xtq said:
shirleythewerewolf":2lx53xtq said:
For practicing, I practice a 2-3 hours a day on my own. For about 45 I work on rudiments and speed with my hands and feet doing different exercises, about a half hour playing to my Ipod just working on different songs I like to practice to and challenge myself with, and then the other 45 minutes I play with a metronome and just work on different fills and beats that I want to bring to my band.
That's a healthy practice routine. Do you leave room for new material, such as systematic books? Might be something to include in your regiment.

Also, as Chris Whitten (Paul McCartney, World Party, etc.) will tell you, always leave time to become a person, as well. Read books and stuff.
I definitely do, I work out of Stick Control religiously as well as Advanced Techniques for the Modern Drummer by Jim Chapin, The Easy Read Rock book by Jack Brand (the groover's section in there is amazing), Advanced Funk Studies by Rick Latham, and Advanced Concepts by Kim Plainfield. I love working out of books also because it helps me to learn so much. I always study styles that I don't play with my band to branch out. Since I've followed that practice regiment my playing has really improved.

I definitely leave time to be a person too lol. I'm a big skateboarder :)
Excellent! I've heard nothing but raves about the Kim Plainfield book. I'll have to check that out. Something else you might look, as a diversion from big systematic books, is Frank Briggs' The Good Foot. I endorse everything Briggs does because he's so good, but that book is unique in that it's just about the only book that adequately addresses good foot control. It's especially good for single-bass drummers such as myself ;) but it can be applied to double-bass, too. You will, of course, be studying out of Stick Control the rest of your life. LOL

Coolio on the skateboarding. Glad to see a studious young drummer who also sees the sun on occasion. As you move into more professional situations, you will find having outside interests and a well-developed personality will benefit you as much as being a qualified musician.
 
Top