Home studio

Hey all, I have a band and we're interested in recording. I was wondering how much it would cost to set up the cheapest decent studio i could. I already have a laptop which I could use to record onto, so I just need mics really. Already got amps and instruments.

Any help would be appreciated.

Cheers
 

drummert2k

New member
as far as mics go, check into the following:

AUDIO TECHNICA-40/47 (LARGE DIAPHRAGM CONDENSER)

AUDIO TECHNICA-40/60 (LARGE DIAPHRAGM TUBE CONDENSER)

BLUE MOUSE (LARGE DIAPHRAGM CONDENSER)

BLUE DRAGONFLY (LARGE DIAPHRAGM CONDENSER)

EV-468 (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

EV-308-B (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

EV-168 (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

EV-RE-11 (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

SHURE-BETA/56 (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

SHURE-BETA/57 (SMALL-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

SHURE-KSM/44 (LARGE DIAPHRAGM CONDENSER)

SHURE-SM/7 (LARGE-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

SHURE-SM/81 (SMALL DIAPHRAGM CONDENSER)

SHURE-BETA/52 (LARGE-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

SENNHEISER 421-II (LARGE-DIAPHRAGM DYNAMIC)

But even with a computer, you have to make sure it'll be able to handle the load. not to mention the recording software you'll have to buy and instal on it.

and you'll also need pre amps, compressors ect. for that look into these:

TRIDENT S-40 MICROPHONE PRE-AMP/COMPRESSOR/PARAMETRIC EQ-CHANNEL STRIP.

NightPro PreQ3-4 Channel Microphone Preamplifier.

FOCUSRITE ISA-428(4-CHANNEL PRE-AMP)

FOCUSRITE ISA-220 PRE-AMP/COMPRESSOR/PARAMETRIC EQ-CHANNEL STRIP etc...

UNIVERSAL AUDIO-LA-610 TUBE PRE-AMP/COMPRESSOR/EQ-CHANNEL STRIP.

16-AARDVARK 24 BIT CLASS A-PRE-AMPS AND

2-STEREO S/PDIF AARDVARK PRE-AMPS

JOE MEEK VC6Q-PRE-AMP/COMPRESSOR/EQ-CHANNEL STRIP.

DIGITECH RP-2000.

JBL M-712 STEREO COMPRESSOR.

DBX-160 COMPRESSORS(X-3)

RNC COMPRESSOR

ALESIS 3630-STEREO COMPRESSOR-GATE

ALESIS STEREO E-Q

AMPEG SVP BASS PRE-AMP

J-STATION-AMP MODELING

SANS AMP-AMP MODELING PREAMP

The Brick
Tube Microphone and Instrument Preamplifier/Direct box

seting up a home studio is easy, but setting up one that you can actually be proud of what comes out of it and that people will want to record at can be pricey.
 

Deanoatc

New member
I picked up a set of Nady drum mikes. 2 condensors, a kick, and 4 snare/tom mikes. I also have a vocal condensor. One of my old bands used those little home studio's that cost a grand, and it was all we needed. If you mess with it the quality is pretty good. Good enough for around town stuff anyway.
 

wolfendenstate

New member
If you just want to record a half decient demo I picked up a couple of ambient or room mics from an electrical shop for about £4 each. you can't do much editing of the drum sound, but with a bit of eq-ing and stuff you can get a clear enough drum sound. Then it's just the case of micing up your amps to record bass and guitar etc.
If you want to hear how the mics sound, http://www.myspace.com/wolfendenstate
but those drum sounds haven't been touched at all, think they need a tad bit of bass added to them to capture the bass drum a bit better.

However, if you look around enough you should be able to find a cheap studio, sometimes its good to check out teachers and tutors, as a few have little home studios that you may be able to rent out on the cheap.

The thing is, the recording isn't the hard bit, it's the mixing and editing that is really time consuming. My old band went into a studio, recorded 6 tracks in two days, then spent about 10 hours with the guy trying to get the mix, we worked as late as we possibly could, but in the end never got quite the right sound.

Basically, either way your going to spend a lot of time and money, but having someone else on board used to recording in some sense is probably the better, and cheaper way to go.

Sorry if that was a lot, but I've had a lot of recording experience and there are a lot of pitfalls to deal with.
 

Gaddabout

New member
You can't record straight to your laptop. You still need a mixing board. Studio time with a qualified engineer is probably cheaper than buying all of the equipment. A lot cheaper in some situations.

Something to look into: Local colleges with a recording studio often times offer reduced rates if you allow them to do their thing and you stick to your thing. There's usually one master engineer there who knows what he's doing with a bunch of students who are learning the craft. It's not perfect, but it can be a good quality recording for a cheap price.

There's actually a recording arts school in my town here that does the same thing, but they're really good at what they do. They have their own professional studio. Top notch stuff.
 

golfchance

New member
Yes, in addition to mics, you'll need a mixer and an audio interface to connect the mixer channel outputs to your laptop.

Look at Digidesign or MOTU interfaces for starters.
 

Flatliner

New member
A real professional recording is a lot more complicated than you probably understand. If you want to do things digitally then you can use a program like Reason which will run you around $600 (which is a steal compared to if you want everything you would need in the physical world.)

If you just want a demo recording you can do it with less, but you'll still need some sort of program/device to record into. I suggest you do a lot of research and figure out what you are trying to get out of the recording and then you will know how much it will cost and if it would be cheaper to simply go to a studio.
 

sinborn

New member
Hmm. It depends on what you want to spend more time on, writing the music or recording it. I find that elaborate multi-track recording takes away from the "heat" of the music in the moment. I love awesome-sounding recordings, but if I wanna hear a good song, I don't need the pristine studio quality to hear the musicical idea contained within. My band is in the process of writing new material, and to get it on tape, I set a single SM58 on the ground inbetween my drumset and my guitarist's amp. Quick, painless, and sounded better than I would expect after spending countless hours recording our last album in my basement, using the best mics at my disposal.

If you are new to recording, don't jump in the deep end. Buy a good mic or two (SM57/SM58) and a recorder with built-in mic preamps. When you know what you're doing, you'll be ready for more. I started with a tape deck, a radioshack DJ mixer, and 3 of the worst mics I've ever used. I still have tapes I made with that rig. I now work on an 8-in 6-out DAW made from a lightning-struck (new motherboard) Dell, 4 soundblaster cards with custom drivers (kX drivers), 20 year-old Yamaha mixer (MC1604), and Behringer Truth Monitors. It's all mounted in/on an old Hammond M3 organ case, and looks pretty slick if I do say so myself.
 

DreamT

New member
where do you live dude? I know I guy near where I live that record for you a 5 song demo at professional quality and I mean serious professional quality for about $900. He records in a basement at his parents house but has recorded over 350 albums in the last 5 years. When bands get cash from their label to spend on a cd they go to this guy, get an entire cd done for about $5k and pocket the rest of the money. Let me know what you think. I think you'll actually come out cheaper in the long run going with this guy plus the things he can do to make you sound better are unreal.
 

blackreign

New member
From my experience... a home studio can be a good thing and a bad thing...

first of all, from a bad perspective, a home studio can be very expensive... I have put already 20, 000 into mine, and thats sadly not even professional.
though you can make a pretty decent sounding demo with 1 condeser mic,
1 dynamic mic an audio interface or digital mixer...
it still will lack the professionalism of most demos coming out these days.

In my expereince learning to use all the equipment can sometimes be a pain in the ass, especially if your basicly just learning as you go, while recording a demo, and finding a mastering house for cheap is just as frustrating, so I ended up mastering the demo myself, and well, I see why mastering houses are so expensive now, but Im starting to get the hang of things after a year or so.

Home studios are a good thing to have on your side though, as its very usefull to record songs whenever you feel like it, and its also mostly a one time cost unless you decide to upgrade every once in a while.

If you really want a cheap way to record there are several ways you can start recording.

The cheapest would be the method I explained earlier, buy a 500 dollar 8 track digital mixer (I have a zoom MRS 8 that I retired after buying a audio interface, they both cost about the same) and if you wish to get the drums recorded cheaply, also buy a condenser mic (so it can pick the entire room up, it wont sound that great, but decent enough) and buy a dynamic mic (shure 57 mics are the cheapest that I have used) to record guitars and bass...

Now obviously this means you would have to record in parts opposed to recording a "live" demo, but at leased it gets you somewhere. For mastering I recommend finding a mastering house in your city, for your information 12 tracks of mastering can cost anywhere between 500-1500 for a cheap mastering house. (last time I checked here anyway)

But look around at your music stores if you are interested... and mabye you'll find a new hobby to do as well as drumming! there are lots of sites online too...

http://www.recording.org is a good place to start, register in the forums there and you can ask "professionals" what their opinons are, just watch some of the people on their refuse to really help anyone... but there still are some nice people to help you out...

I hope any of this info helped you a bit
 
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