Holding my sticks and speed

how can i play faster but still control my sticks?

my left hand doesnt move as fast as my right. I just like shake it. how can i fix this problem? :?
 

drummert2k

New member
practice. start slow and build you're speed. starting slow you can gain the control as you build your speed
 

TrunJun

New member
heres the best advice i can give you...

recently i've made revolutionary bounds and leaps as far as left hand leads and blast beats go, and my left hand is completely independent. The biggest thing you need to do with your left hand is RELAX!! make sure you've got the correct "flashlight" grip on your stick and make sure that your middle finger and index finger knuckles stay as flat as possible. Using your middle and ring finger (and pinkey for those kinds of players) for stick control is made MUCH easier by keeping your hands flat with the proper grip, which is especially noticable like i said in the knuckles of your middle and index finger. make sure youre using your wrist properly too, it should be a snap down, hands flat, and it should allow you to double (and triple) strokes with relatively no effort. Drumming is ALL about your wrists and your hip flexor muscles (for double bass) and COUNTING. Start slow, 120 bpm single stroke eighth notes on your left hand, keeping time with half notes on your right or with your left foot on the hat, then build it up 5-10 bpm from there. Relaxing is a key to this, play it for LONG periods of time till you can steadily keep pace with the eighth notes without thinking about it. You should still be counting, but not exactly "thinking" about what your left hand is doing. You need to develope the muscle memory and really, the only way to develope speed is to start slow and increase the speed. starting off slower will also develope the basic muscle memory of the stroke and when attempting higher speeds, you will know what it is supposed to feel like fom playing it slower...

other helpful things for left hand developement... repeated paradiddles and paradiddlediddles with left hand leads, swiss triplets with left hand leads, 4,5,6,7,8,9 double stroke rolls with left hand leads (same with single), 3,6,9,12 (and all inbetween) triple stroke rolls with left hand leads, left foot leads on double bass and high hat time keeping (i know it sounds wierd, but it definetly helped me develope my left hand by working with my left foot)

Hope this helps, if you have any questions, shoot me an email on my myspace page...

myspace.com/priziest_horse

Many Happy Skin-Beatings :D
 

maddogg72

New member
NOTE: This is my first post here, so I probably wrote alot of non-essential blabber. Sorry. PS. This section is about grip.

I had a similar problem before I got a drum teacher. When I started playing I taught myself everything, including grip. I could play fluently, but my left hand was always behind and weaker.

My problem was that I would hold the sticks with the fulcrum between my thumb knuckle and second index knuckle, and use the tips of my other fingers to make it bounce. The problem was that I kept my wrist straight, and used my fingers, which made my grip to loose.

Anyways, My teacher taught me to use my thumb tip and 1st knuckle on index as the fulcrum, and run the stick parallel to my life line on my palm ( I think that what its called) so that the end will rest in the middle of my the bottom of my palm, where it meets the wrist, and use my other 3 fingers to hold the stick (not with too much pressure) to my palm. With this there should be some space between the stick and palm, and us movements of the wrist to strike the head, while trying to keep the arm straight.

It took me a while to get used to it, but after about 2 weeks it was pretty natural. After time you could loosen the grip a bit for double strokes and such. After I got used to it, I noticed that I had more control over my left hand, and was more able to match the velocity (or strength, pitch, sound.. what ever it is called) of my right. The patterns described in the reply above mine are good to build syncronization, speed, and independence.

At the end of 2006 (display until March 1,2007) DRUM! put out a magazine
called "How To Play Drums" that has a bunch of great information for people of all skill levels. On page 22 there is a chapter about grips, and how to hold sticks. It basically describes what I wrote above, but with slight differences (and there are pictures that demonstrate the what they mean). Also in this issue there are sections about kit setup advise, practice routines, tuning, reading notation, and notation of some songs. It also includes a 2-hour DVD, all for $8.95 US. I recommend picking it up if possible.

Sorry for rattling on, but I hope this information helped you somewhat.
 

Gaddabout

New member
maddog, welcome to dml and good to see another phoenix participant on board. your instructor gave you some good advice. When you're first learning, it's important to establish that comfortable fulcrum and stick pivot from the start. The more you learn, the more you'll be able to learn how to manipulate that pivot and allow the stick to do the work for you.
 
Check out this video of Chad Szeliga, the drummer from Breaking Benjamin. He's a very talented drummer and through Breaking Benjamin's site, The Shallow Bay, he frequently offers drum lessons from the road.

This is the most recent one posted; he talks about rudiments which I'm sure many people know, but offers a lot of insight as far as holding the sticks for single stroke and double stroke rolls that helped me a lot.

Hope it helps!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PFiH0f1ZGOU
 

chachaman02

New member
Try playing quarter notes slowly. alternating hands- r-r-r-r-l-l-l-l. Then pic up speed and start leading with ur left hand. l-l-l-l-r-r-r-r. then try doing 3's and double strokes. r-r-r-l-l-l r-r-l-l. pic up speed. eventually you will build your muscles in your wrists and your arms as well as acuracy.
 

SiegeOfPower616

New member
all these people that say.
start slow and build up.
that may be the cae but i started of playing slayer and now 3 years later im able to consistantly play blasts batteries and 16th note drum fills for as long as i want at 270 bpm.
the best way to improve your speed is by playing fast stuff.

and at first you wont be able to play it you'll probs need to have some bottles of water spar, but it will pay off in the long run srsly.

good luck.
 

Gaddabout

New member
SiegeOfPower616":1cqawvwr said:
the best way to improve your speed is by playing fast stuff.
There is truth to this. At some point you have to practice at tempo. It is indeed the only way to gain dexterity.

However, if you intend on playing something more complicated than sixteenth-note fills -- say flam passages, anything involving diddles -- the only way to learn how to play those CLEANLY is to practice them slowly. That's why people are offering that advice. If you're attempting to learn how to play an entire accompaniment of rudiments, you first learn those at 40 to 60 BPM and work your way up as you play 100 perfect executions each round.

I'm not Pat Petrillo, but I learned by first playing slowly, and I think my hand skills are above average. More importantly, I've had time to develop finger control, which means I can play faster for much longer periods of time.
 

SiegeOfPower616

New member
yes but theres playing fast and theres player Faaaaaaast.
i agree but really you should reach the speed you want exceed it get comfortable with that then you dont have to bother playing 40 or 60.
skip out the middle work jump straight in a speed ure drums off.
i dont use many rudiments and they dont giv a sense of continuity. and tbh sound quite slow.
the best way to play fast is single strokes at high speeds.
its the the most powerful way.
which is much better than using double's (cheating)
 

Gaddabout

New member
SiegeOfPower616":ns9e4oh7 said:
yes but theres playing fast and theres player Faaaaaaast.
i agree but really you should reach the speed you want exceed it get comfortable with that then you dont have to bother playing 40 or 60.
skip out the middle work jump straight in a speed ure drums off.
i dont use many rudiments and they dont giv a sense of continuity. and tbh sound quite slow.
the best way to play fast is single strokes at high speeds.
its the the most powerful way.
which is much better than using double's (cheating)
Not everyone is out to play that kind of music, though. If you wish to play modern rock, jazz, blues, country, there's an important element of clarity of idea, clarity of phrasing, clarity of delivery. If you go straight for fast single strokes, you'll never get hired for those genres.
 

madchops

New member
learn how to hold sticks correctly. Practice on a pillow and use metal sticks. Don't grip too tight. Most drummers hole the sticks wrong.
 
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